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(1628–1702), the Apostle of the Peak. Ashe was educated at Mr Foxlow's school in Chesterfield and at Samuel Ogden's school at Wirksworth before being admitted on 7 May 1688 to Richard Frankland's academy , then located at Attercliffe , near Sheffield. He completed his ministerial training at the home in Ford, Derbyshire , of his uncle, William Bagshaw. His first ministerial appointment was in 1692 as chaplain to Lady Sarah Houghton of Houghton Towers, Lancashire. In the following year he returned to the Peak District to become minister to the n

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Bakewell, Thomas ( 1761–1835 ), mad-doctor and poet , was born on 1 June 1761 at Kingstone , near Uttoxeter , in Staffordshire. He was raised by his maternal grandfather, John Chadwick , who kept a private mad-house at Grindon in the Peak District. Chadwick moved to Ashbourne in Derbyshire , where Bakewell received a limited education at the school of a Mr Richards. He was profoundly influenced by his experiences in his grandfather's mad-house. He received no formal medical training. After Chadwick's death, the management of the mad-house passed

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(1791), a view of Taunton Castle for Joshua Toulmin's History of the Town of Taunton (1791), and an aquatint of Oakhampton Castle, Devon , which was published by W. Hibbart. Bampfylde made several painting tours including Hampshire (1765, 1770), the Peak District (1766, 1780), and the Lake District (1780). He exhibited at the Society of Artists in 1763 and 1766, the Free Society in 1783, and the Royal Academy , as an honorary exhibitor in 1771, 1772, 1774, and 1783. Many of Bampfylde's oil paintings are of idealized classical landscapes influenced

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Through Mary's brother, who lived near Wootton Hall, Northampton , the duchess met and generously befriended Jean Jacques Rousseau who took refuge there for a few months in 1766–7. She sent him plants and books, and in September 1766 he joined her on an expedition to the Peak District in search of wild plants. After the death of the duke in 1762 and of her own husband in 1768, Mrs Delany passed every summer at Bulstrode , where in 1772 she devised her method of cutting flowers in paper, allegedly deceiving the duchess with her initial collage into taking

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Colin B. Atkinson and Jo B. Atkinson

refers to him as ' Mr. Bentley , gent. ' No other entry in the parish records includes such an honorific. His son Samwell died in 1587 and was also buried in St Andrew's , leaving only Hannah , who married Sir George Fulwood of Holborn and Middleton in the Derbyshire Peak District as his second wife. In 1582 Bentley had been elected warden at St Andrew's , and in 1584 he compiled his 'Book' , a collection of extracts from parish records and wardens' accounts. He records financial details of church upkeep, accounts of celebrations of Queen Elizabeth's

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household he met his own future wife, Jemima ( c.1602–1679) , daughter of Sir Thomas Beckingham of Tolleshunt Major, Essex; she was Lady Tryon's young cousin and companion. On Tryon's presentation, Bourne was instituted to the living of Ashover , in the Derbyshire Peak District , on 11 July 1621. Further publications followed, The True Way of a Christian, to the New Jerusalem appearing in 1622 and The Anatomie of Conscience , an assize sermon preached at Derby , in 1623. In the summer of 1623, by licence dated 7 July, Bourne married Jemima; the

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established early: 'As a child I wrote because it was as natural to me to write as to breathe, and before I could write I invented stories' ( V. Brittain , On Becoming a Writer , 1947, 172 ). The Brittains moved again in 1905 to Buxton, Derbyshire , 10 miles away, in the Peak District. In that fashionable spa resort town, the Brittains lived in a large house, High Leigh , for two years; then an even larger house, Melrose , near the park. While she enjoyed physical activities like tennis, and walking in the country surrounding Buxton , Vera felt suffocated

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noteworthy journals of three tours he made between 1794 and 1796 to Derbyshire , the Lake District and Scotland , to Wales , and to Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire , visiting towns, country houses, and manufacturers. Highlights included his stay with Thomas Pennant , with whom he corresponded in 1794 and 1797, at Downing, Flintshire , and a meeting with Robert Raikes , the promoter of Sunday schools, at Gloucester , as well as visits to Bedford Abbey and the Peak caverns. The final entry, made in September 1796 on his return to Debden Hall , which he

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Phytologist from 1930 to 1961. At Sheffield an increasing proportion of Clapham's time was given to serving on committees of the university, of learned societies, and of national bodies, such as the Nature Conservancy , Field Studies Council , and the planning board of the Peak District National Park. He was a trustee of the British Museum (Natural History) from 1965 to 1975. In 1959 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society. He also served the University of Sheffield as a pro-vice-chancellor (1954–8) and was acting vice-chancellor in 1965. In 1948 he

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figure, giving momentum to an imaginative reform of the curriculum and throwing himself energetically into departmental and outreach activities. He also cemented the reputation for generous hospitality he and Liz had acquired wherever they went. As well as hill walking in the Peak District , his hobbies included listening to baroque music. He was a skilled player of the harpsichord and clavichord and a talented amateur cartoonist. Collinson was surprised to receive the invitation to succeed Geoffrey Elton as regius professor at Cambridge in 1988. A well-known

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concern for his future. By 1809 they were still supplementing his meagre income and worried about his continued devotion to landscape painting. Even the three tours he made to expand his repertoire of picturesque scenery—the Peak District in 1801, a month-long voyage down the Thames and along the Kentish coast in 1803, and the Lake District in 1806—had been subsidized by family or friends. After ten years in London , however bleak his prospects may have looked and however small his impact in the public arena, he was none the less making progress: he had exhibited

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earl of Lancaster ( d. 1345) , in Derbyshire and Staffordshire , and of having committed two murders, and they had already formed associations with other criminals. Between 1330 and 1332 James Coterel led a ring of gangs involved in murder, kidnapping, and extortion in the Peak District and northern Nottinghamshire. Despite his own attachment for murder at the Derbyshire eyre of 1330, and the outlawry of his associates in March 1331, Coterel was never arrested. This was due to the support he received in the area, especially from two religious communities

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regularly leaving his wonderful Stradivarius unattended on the stairs of the music department building in Sheffield. He died of a heart attack at the Northern General Hospital in Sheffield on 29 May 2015. His funeral on 15 June, at a packed Edale parish church in the Peak District , was filled with joyful and poignant music performed by leading musicians from across the UK (and including a number of family members). He was survived by his wife, Nina , son, Martin ( b. 1976 ), and daughter, Hazel ( b. 1979 ), all three distinguished professional

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serving as a commissioner for sixteen years (latterly as deputy chairman) and as a member of the Northumberland National Park Committee for ten years. They had a daughter, Susan , and two sons— Michael , a town and country planner, who served as national park officer of the Peak District (1985–92) and as director-general of the Countryside Commission (the successor body to the National Parks Commission ) from 1992 to 1996, and Robin , an architect who served as a countryside commissioner from 1982 to 1991 and as a member of the Northumberland National Park

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Norse viking, Sihtric , invaded north-west Mercia in 920 and destroyed Davenport (in what is now Cheshire ) that Edward began his final move against the north. Before midsummer of 920 he had ordered a second fortress built at Nottingham , and he went from there into the Peak District , where he had a fort built at Bakewell. It is uncertain whether this was followed by any combat between the English and the Norse: the chronicle simply reports that after the building of the fortress at Bakewell , the king of the Scots , and Ragnall , and all of those who

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celebrations in 1907. An incessant world traveller, in summer often he climbed in Switzerland , in the Engadin and Oberland with Josef Kuster of Engelberg. Small and light, he ran daily near his home at Weetwood in Ecclesall and at weekends enjoyed long walks in the Peak District and Lakes. In later life he climbed Helvellyn every year, the Matterhorn when aged seventy, and the Jungfrau on his seventy-fifth birthday with Sir Leonard Pearce , his daughter, a friend, and guides. About the time of his wife's death in 1938 he established a fund of

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1922–2000 ). Family outings with his nature-loving father provided Roy , in childhood, with ‘blissful, almost visionary experiences’ ( Fisher , An Easily Bewildered Child , 27 ), and were the foundation for his decision decades later to live in a quiet village in the Derbyshire Peak District. Fisher ’s calm demeanour and unremarkable appearance disguised the fact that his mind simply didn’t work the way other people’s minds work—witness his synaesthesia, ‘the idea that sewn like a lining inside the customary world there was another with tones and imperatives of its

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Ernest France (1880–1939) , bank manager, and his wife, Catherine Moncrieff, née Ames (1879–1963) , teacher of dancing. He was a boarder at Bishop's Stortford College (1924–8). In 1929 he followed his father into the District Bank , where he worked for eleven years in the Manchester area, sometimes looking after small branches in the Peak District. On 27 April 1940 he married Frances Margaret Linton Palmer (1913–1998) , whom he had met on a walking tour in Austria. She was the daughter of Dr J. C. L. Palmer. It was during the Second World War that France

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Scot. Acad. , 1881; National War Museum, Edinburgh Castle ) was inspired by Gibb's reading of Alexander Kinglake's book The Invasion of the Crimea , and the account of the 93rd highlanders at Balaklava on 25 October 1854. The artist had taken a walking holiday in the Peak District of Derbyshire , and while out walking by the River Wye near Haddon Hall glanced up to a slight rise and imagined he saw a line of highlanders ' all plaided and plumed in their tartan array ' ( Gilbert , 28 ). He hastened back to his lodgings where he sketched the image. This

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started to record his impressions of working-class life in south Lancashire , drawing on what he himself knew of subsistence in the slums and the emotional escape from them in books and music, as well as physical release in cheap-day excursions to the Pennine hills and the Peak District. These were the materials he used in his first and best-known work, Love on the Dole , published in 1933. The strength of Love on the Dole as a novel lies not in its descriptions or its narrative but in the honesty with which it tells its story of urban poverty and in the richness