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He resided initially with Sir Everard Fawkener in Wandsworth , and subsequently with a dyer named Peter Pellon at Half-Farthing. Other addresses include Cavalier's in Billiter Square , the White Wig in Maiden Lane , near Covent Garden , and Lord Hervey's house at Ickworth. He took English lessons from John Kuweidt and Edward Higginson , teachers at a nearby Quaker school, and within five months was fluent. Four decades later British visitors to Ferney , such as James Boswell , could still be conversed with in English. He knew Swift , whose

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James Mew

revised by M. C. Curthoys

of British Architects , founded in 1834, he was made an honorary member of the institute and became corresponding member of the Pontifical Archaeological Academy at Rome. In December 1869 Gladstone , on behalf of the crown, presented him to the rectory of Horningsheath-with-Ickworth , near Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk. Burgess died at Brighton on 12 April 1881.

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of Thurlow in Suffolk. In 1712 the corporation of Bury St Edmunds elected him minister of St Mary's, Bury St Edmunds , which he held until 1725. From 1715 he was also rector of Euston in Suffolk , until 1720. The earl of Bristol , whose chaplain he was, presented him to Ickworth with Wordwell in 1717, which he held until 1733. From 1723 to 1743 he was also preacher of St James's, Bury St Edmunds. In 1728 he became a chaplain to George II. Butts's preferment came through the interest of John, Lord Hervey , son of the first earl of Bristol , a prominent

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Diarmaid MacCulloch

Chitting, Henry ( 1580–1638 ), herald , was the eldest son of Thomas Chitting of Ickworth, Suffolk , and his wife, Ann Gipps (1547/8–1607). His career probably benefited from family ties to Lord Keeper Sir Nicholas Bacon. He bought the place of Chester herald from Thomas Knight , the patent passing on 18 July 1618. He visited Berkshire and Gloucestershire in 1623 for William Camden , Clarenceux king of arms, and Lincolnshire and Derbyshire in 1634 for Sir Richard St George , Clarenceux. A volume of Chitting's manuscripts survives in Lord Walpole's

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daughter of Richard Foster , banker, of Lostwithiel, Cornwall. Important commissions during this time include Knightshayes, Devon (1874–82), where Crace worked in a mixed Gothic–Islamic style after the dismissal of the architect William Burges , and the Pompeian Room at Ickworth in Suffolk (1879) in conjunction with the architect Francis Penrose , a personal friend. J. D. Crace later noted that the principal figurative paintings had been executed by Henry Scholtz , a decorative painter his father had engaged in Paris to work on the lower library

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Farington , Diary , 4.1380 ). In 1801 Day and his wife had a son and two daughters aged between one and nine. Very little is known of Day's work as an artist, though contemporary accounts show he maintained a practice in Rome. A miniature of John, Lord Hervey , dated 1795, is at Ickworth, Suffolk; he copied a portrait of Lady Hamilton in 1792 and painted William Lambton in 1797 (both untraced). His miniatures of Venus and Antinous (ex Sothebys , 11 July 1991) are dated 1793, the year in which Day's miniatures were described as ' much inferior in merit to several

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Relics believed to be those of St Edmund were at Beadericesworth , in a church served by clerics, before the mid-tenth century. The Theodred of Abbo's narrative must be Theodred , bishop of London (909×26–951×3), who bequeathed his estates at Nowton , Horningsheath , Ickworth , and Whepstead , all near Beadericesworth , ' to St Edmund's church, as the property of God's community ' ( Whitelock , Anglo-Saxon Wills , no. 1 ). Numerous royal and other benefactions to St Edmund's church at Beadericesworth soon followed. It is most unlikely that any

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long been at odds with the now ascendant Winston Churchill , who had opposed the 1935 Government of India Act. In March 1941 Erskine resigned his seat and retired to his house, Ickworth , near Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk , where he was active in local affairs, especially during the Second World War. But his health steadily deteriorated and, after a major operation, he died at Ickworth on 3 May 1953, at the age of fifty-eight. His wife survived him. Erskine always regarded himself as a Conservative in the liberal tradition, perhaps closest among his generation

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had been made for the king in Nicholas's lifetime, and more were made for the royal family thereafter. They were created by John's son Nicholas and differed from earlier ones in being multilingual. John and his daughter Virginia meantime created a much simpler one, now at Ickworth. On 2 April 1640 John and Nicholas presented the latter's volumes to the king at Whitehall. In March 1642 one last volume, a concordance of the Pentateuch , was in preparation when John received the king, the prince of Wales , and the palsgrave at Little Gidding in the

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Bristol , who ordered a large free-standing marble group for the vestibule of his Suffolk manor house, Ickworth House. The resulting statue is one of the most important and influential to be produced in the late eighteenth century, initiating passion and violence into the sculptural portrayal of antique poetry and using Hellenistic imagery as source material in a way that few since the Renaissance had dared to contemplate. The Fury of Athamas (1790–93; Ickworth House, Suffolk ) depicts another subject from Ovid's Metamorphoses , a text on which Flaxman often

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and they had three sons and a daughter between 1692 and 1700; she died in 1703. Exercising his rights over fishing at Ashprington there in 1695, it was alleged that Gipps and two servants broke into a poacher's house doing damage and taking goods worth £100. In June 1702 his Ickworth whig neighbour John Hervey came to complain that Gipps had cut down trees of his for the Whelnetham maypole, but the moment was ill-judged, for that morning Gipps had heard that he and other tories were put out of the commission for the peace of the county. A court case between

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and Irish grand tourists, including resident émigrés such as Prince Charles Edward Stuart and his family (1785–8, National Portrait Gallery, London , and Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh ), and long-term residents such as the fourth earl of Bristol ( c.1786, Ickworth, Suffolk ). While in Rome , Hamilton developed a close friendship with fellow artists such as John Flaxman and especially Antonio Canova , solidifying his relationship with the latter by including him in a superb large-scale pastel (1788–9, V&A ) where he stands with another

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Harvey, Sir Nicholas ( c. 1491–1532 ), diplomat , was the third son of William Harvey ( d. 1538) of Ickworth, Suffolk , and Joan , daughter of John Cokett of Ampton, Suffolk. Descended from a leading Bedfordshire family, Nicholas Harvey's grandfather had settled in Suffolk , near Bury St Edmunds. By 1512, probably soon after he came of age, Harvey had married Elizabeth , daughter of Sir Thomas Fitzwilliam of Aldwark, Yorkshire , and the widow of Sir Thomas Mauleverer; they had at least one son, Thomas. About 1519, following the death of

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and was a champion tennis player. Having been ordained both deacon and priest in October 1832, Hervey was instituted in November to the small family living of Ickworth-cum-Chedburgh, Suffolk; as Chedburgh was in 1844 separated from Ickworth and joined to Horningsheath or Horringer , he also became curate of Horringer , until in 1856 he was instituted to the rectory which he held with Ickworth. On 30 July 1839 he married Patience , daughter of John Singleton of Hazeley, Hampshire , and Mell, co. Louth. They had twelve children. He took a leading

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Hervey , third earl of Bristol ( 1724–1779 ) by Sir Joshua Reynolds , 1762–3 Manor House Museum, Bury St Edmunds Hervey, Augustus John, third earl of Bristol ( 1724–1779 ), naval officer and politician , was born on 19 May 1724, the second son of John Hervey, Baron Hervey of Ickworth (1696–1743) , courtier and politician, and his wife, Mary Hervey, née Lepell (1699/1700–1768) , and grandson of John Hervey, first earl of Bristol. He entered Westminster School in January 1733, and he probably remained there until May 1735 when he entered the navy as a captain's

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London Hervey, Frederick Augustus, fourth earl of Bristol ( 1730–1803 ), Church of Ireland bishop of Derry , was born at Ickworth House, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk , on 1 August 1730, the third son of John Hervey, Baron Hervey of Ickworth (1696–1743) , courtier and writer, and his wife, Mary Hervey, Lady Hervey (1699/1700–1768) , courtier and wit, the daughter of Brigadier-General Nicholas Lepell and Mary Brooke. The manor of Ickworth had been in Hervey's family since the fifteenth century, but the earldom of Bristol came to him in 1779, from his grandfather

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hours for possession of heroin. Given two years' probation to seek treatment, he retreated to Ickworth. Even there he proved incompatible with the National Trust , whose visitors were disturbed by his dogs and racing cars. By April 1998 he had relinquished his lease and sold all his remaining acreage and household contents. At this stage his health as well as his fortune was in ruins. Living out his final months in a small manor house, Little Horringer Hall , near Ickworth , Bristol died there in his sleep on 10 January 1999. Rumours of AIDS had circulated, but

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Hervey of Ickworth (1696–1743) , politician, and Mary Lepell (1699/1700–1768) , political hostess [ see Hervey, Mary ]. He became ensign in the 38th , or duke of Marlborough's , regiment of foot on 2 June 1739 and ensign in the 1st regiment of foot guards on 11 May 1740. He was travelling in Italy when he was recalled on his promotion to captain in the 48th , or Cholmondeley's , regiment of foot, and he returned home in May 1741 but resigned this commission in August 1742. On 5 August 1743 Hervey succeeded his father as third Baron Hervey of Ickworth , and

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Hervey, John ( 1616–1680 ), politician and courtier , was born on 18 August 1616 and baptized at Ickworth church on the 27th. He was the eldest son and heir of Sir William Hervey ( d. 1660) of Ickworth, Suffolk , MP for Bury St Edmunds in 1628–9, and Susan , daughter of Sir Robert Jermyn, kt , of Rushbrook, Suffolk. Hervey was attached to the household of Robert Sidney, second earl of Leicester , as ambassador to France in 1636, with whom he contracted a warm friendship. He was educated and travelled abroad, including a period at Leiden in 1637

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John Hervey , second Baron Hervey of Ickworth ( 1696–1743 ) by Jean Baptiste van Loo , c. 1740–41 © National Portrait Gallery , London Hervey, John, second Baron Hervey of Ickworth ( 1696–1743 ), courtier and writer , the eldest child of John Hervey, first earl of Bristol (1665–1751) , and his second wife, Elizabeth Felton (1676–1741) , was born on 15 October 1696 at Jermyn Street, London , and baptized on 25 October. Known as Jack in his youth, he had two half-siblings, including a brother, Carr Hervey [ see under Hervey, John, first earl of Bristol