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d'Aubigné ( d. 1167/8) , lord of Belvoir , and his wife, Matilda (or Maud) de Senlis , daughter of Robert de Clare and a close kinswoman of the Clare earls of Hertford , the Senlis earls of Northampton and Huntingdon , and the baronial family of Fitzwalter. The d'Aubignés , native to St Aubin-d'Aubigné , near Rennes , in Brittany , had first settled in England during the reign of Henry I , when William d'Aubigné Brito (the Breton) (d. in or after 1148) had married Cecilia , heir to the honour and castle of Belvoir. D'Aubigné was a minor at the

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north of Rennes in Brittany , whose senior branch had acquired the English honour of Belvoir during the reign of Henry I. This family should not be confused with that of the Aubigny earls of Arundel. Philip's father is probably to be identified as Elias d'Aubigny or d'Aubigné , married to a woman named Hawise. By the 1160s Elias held estates on both sides of the channel, having been enfeoffed by William d'Aubigné ( d. 1167/8) , lord of Belvoir , with land at Belvoir , Ingleby , Saxilby , and Broadholme near Lincoln , and probably by the counts

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gardener, following two generations of nurserymen, and his wife, Lydia, née Jackson. After her husband's early death Bean's mother worked as a nursery and seed dealer. Bean was educated at Archbishop Holgate's Grammar School, York. Aged sixteen he joined the garden staff at Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire , seat of the duke of Rutland. In April 1883 Bean started as a student gardener at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew , ' the most beautiful garden in the world ' ( Bean , Royal Botanic Gardens , vii ). It was ' the world's premier botanical institution ' ( Drayton

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of York Art Gallery ). Bower's best-known paintings are of Charles I at his Trial (1649). He probably worked up his portraits from drawings taken at Westminster Hall during the trial in January 1649. The three main signed and dated versions are in the Royal Collection, at Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire , and at Antony House, Cornwall (on loan from Sir Richard Carew Pole, bt ), with a fourth in a private collection, but numerous variants, copies, and engravings exist because the pattern later became popular with royalists. In the three main versions Bower

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the English mission, being appointed an assistant to the archpriest from about July 1613. When the chapter was formed in 1623 he was on it; he was appointed vicar-general in the midlands, and had the title archdeacon of Huntingdon. From at least 1622 he was firmly ensconced in Belvoir Castle as chaplain to the countess of Rutland. When he wished to research his books he went to the Bodleian , registering there in 1626 as a ' minister of God's word ', which suggests a certain panache at a time when it was still a capital offence to be discovered as a Catholic priest

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tour by visiting Antwerp , Speyer , Heidelberg , and Frankfurt , before returning home early in 1563 after an absence of nearly two years. The following year his father arranged ' a good match ' for Cecil with Dorothy Neville (1548–1609) , daughter of Lord Latimer of Belvoir Castle. She was young and pretty, and was described by a relative, Sir Henry Percy , as ' very wise, sober of behaviour and womanly '. The marriage seems to have been happy. They had thirteen children, five sons and eight daughters. Two became famous: Edward Cecil , who was made Viscount

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military expeditions, the king was by no means insulated from his people. He travelled frequently in the south-eastern counties, hunted in East Anglia , and even conducted an old-fashioned Elizabethan-style progress in summer 1634—descending upon Hinchingbrooke , Althorp , Belvoir , and Castle Ashby. His return journey to Scotland in 1633 took him twice through the midlands and the north. His entries into London included celebrations at St Paul's after the births of his sons. Charles's recreations were not only physical. He continued to enjoy the court masques

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, second daughter of Henry John Brinsley Manners, eighth duke of Rutland. His father, an officer in the Gloucestershire yeomanry , was killed in action in April 1916, and Charteris spent his childhood between Stanway in Gloucestershire , Gosford in East Lothian , Belvoir Castle , and South Uist in the Hebrides , acquiring from the last of these an abiding love of Scotland and of country pursuits. He was educated at Eton College , where he did not especially distinguish himself, but where he was remembered affectionately by masters and contemporaries

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female personifications to adorn Trinity College Library in Cambridge. To appear amenable to his clients, Cibber was prepared to live on site while work continued, and to use local stone to save money. He was commissioned to make seven garden statues of Ketton stone for Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire , and ornamental sculpture for Thoresby Hall in Nottinghamshire (the latter amounting to £536 , all lost in the fire of 1745). His most accomplished work was the altarpiece in the chapel at Chatsworth , a mixture of polychrome and white marbles, which he designed

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dangerous haemorrhage in May 1953. At the very end of that year he embarked with his wife on the French liner Colombie on a cruise to Jamaica. On new year's eve he had another haemorrhage, and he died on board at 3.30 p.m. on 1 January 1954. He was buried five days later at Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire , the home of his wife's family. His son, John Julius , the writer and broadcaster, succeeded him.

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Diana would have none of it, announcing in The Times that she wished to retain her former name and title, so Lady Diana Cooper she remained. In 1953 Duff Cooper was taken violently ill; he recovered, but died on 1 January 1954 on a cruise to Jamaica. He was buried at Belvoir Castle , but Diana did not attend the funeral: she never attended the funerals of those she loved. Her life had been centred round Duff for thirty-five years, and she was distraught without him. Diana lived for a further thirty-two years. She disliked getting old, but found solace

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( Letters , 123 ). Marriage and Vale of Belvoir parishes, 1783–1792 Now that Crabbe had secured preferment, he and Sarah Elmy (1751–1813) were married at Beccles on 15 December 1783 and in January they visited his Dorset livings for several months. The duke of Rutland went to Ireland in February 1784 as lord lieutenant but Crabbe and his wife remained at Belvoir Castle until May 1785 when Crabbe became curate of the parish of Stathern , about 2½ miles south-west of Belvoir Castle. While at Belvoir , they had a child who only lived a few hours

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medical writer James Makittrick Adair , a principal ingredient was the laxative tincture of senna. Daffy became rector of Pluckley, Kent , in 1657, and in December 1660 he was appointed rector of Redmile, Leicestershire , a poorer living than Harby despite being close to Belvoir Castle. Even so, he was well enough off—doubtless thanks to the elixir—to educate his son Thomas at Melton Mowbray School and to enter him in 1666 as a pensioner (receiving no college scholarship) at St John's College, Cambridge. The son, sometimes confused with his father ( for

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Staffordshire committee, and he was an assessment commissioner for Leicestershire (April and December 1649, November 1650, December 1652) and a trustee for sequestered tithes (June 1649). In June 1649 the council of state assigned Danvers and others to oversee the destruction of Belvoir Castle. The council commissioned him a major in the Leicestershire militia (March 1650) and a colonel in the Staffordshire militia (May 1650). From 1650 to 1652 he was governor of Stafford , during which period the council of state praised him for preparing troops to defend against

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Digby was associated with the band he was never formally a pensioner ( Tighe , 358 ). Towards the end of the century he made the acquaintance of Father Gerard , who effected the conversion of both husband and wife. Nevertheless Digby was knighted by the new king, James I , at Belvoir Castle on 24 April 1603, during his journey south to London. Four days afterwards he appears as a gentleman pensioner extraordinary at the queen's funeral. Little more than two years later, however, Digby's friendship for Robert Catesby , and the latter's need of money to underpin

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regional groupings were far from rigid, however, and several of the twenty-five had holdings spanning these areas. William d'Aubigné , for example, who had close ties to Fitzwalter from at least 1203, was lord of Belvoir but also held extensive estates in Lincolnshire and Yorkshire. John de Lacy was not only lord of Pontefract , but held Castle Donington in Leicestershire. John fitz Robert ( d. 1241) , lord of Warkworth , Rothbury , and the barony of Whalton , all in Northumberland , was also an important figure in East Anglia , as well as holding

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candidate. In June 1728 he returned briefly, as an assistant master, to Eton where he was tutor to the marquess of Granby. His reward for this service came in 1735 with his presentation to the living of Bottesford , the church being the closest to the Manners's seat at Belvoir Castle. He was ordained priest on 1 June 1735. In 1738 the duke of Rutland obtained a canonry of Winchester for Ewer , though Ewer's attempt to gain the income from the preceding vacancy in the canonry failed. In 1741 Ewer accompanied Lord Granby on the grand tour, which included

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Campbell Dodgson

revised by Sarah Herring

England and was employed by Sir Peter Lely to paint the draperies in some of his portraits. On his marriage he settled in Northamptonshire , where he worked as a portrait painter for the duke of Rutland , producing made-up portraits of the first eight earls of Rutland for Belvoir Castle. Similar imaginary portraits of the fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Montagues by van der Eyden hang in Boughton House, Northamptonshire , perhaps commissioned by Ralph, first duke of Montagu. These are recorded in the 1718 inventory of Boughton House as ' six hole

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known whether this person was Mary Eyre herself or a surveyor employed by her. While Speed and Saxton , for example, show stylized churches, castles, and manors Mary Eyre's map shows them as they were, distinguishing for instance between churches with towers and churches with steeples. The map thus gives important information about land use (including the extent of Sherwood Forest ) and buildings, such as Belvoir Castle , of which it offers the only known seventeenth-century representation. On 6 June 1633, at Rampton , Mary Eyre married William Blythe. Nothing

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on the western boundary of the northern neck. In 1745 the privy council upheld the survey's conclusions, enabling Fairfax to more than double his holding to 5 million acres. Two years later he moved permanently to Virginia , and for some time lived at his cousin's house at Belvoir. Here he made the acquaintance of the Washington family. Fairfax moved to the Shenandoah valley , where he built two properties, Leeds Manor and Greenway Court , near Winchester. George Washington , then a young man of sixteen, was asked to survey and map his property. At