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from which Bloxam probably studied the stars through his Dolland telescope. Scrupulous in his search for truth, Bloxam had no qualms in demystifying popular legends. He asserted that Godiva's nude canter through Coventry was pure invention, and told a dismayed audience at Lutterworth that their objects of veneration associated with John Wyclif were fakes. It is therefore surprising that, without bothering to corroborate his facts, he perpetuated the myth that the game of rugby originated with William Webb Ellis handling the ball during a Rugby School match

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Bond, Charles John ( 1856–1939 ), surgeon and advocate of voluntary euthanasia , was born at Bittesby , in the Lutterworth area of Leicestershire , on 27 October 1856, the son of George Bond , a farmer and grazier, and his wife, Elizabeth Higginson. He was educated at Repton School. Having spent a year in agriculture he was a pupil at Leicester Royal Infirmary from February to October 1875, when he entered University College, London , as a medical student. He won gold medals in anatomy and physiology and silver medals in surgery, midwifery, and medical

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1813 he was invited to succeed to the pulpit at Salters' Hall Chapel , which, with the agreement of his congregation at Peckham , he accepted in addition to his existing duties. On 20 October 1813 he married Mary ( d. 1828?) , the only daughter and coheir of Thomas Hawkes of Lutterworth; they had one daughter. As well as being a popular evangelical preacher, attracting a fashionable congregation, Collyer was a prolific author. His works included many sermons and hymns, and a series of popular lectures on scriptural subjects, including Lectures on Scripture Facts

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Albert Venn ( 1835–1922 ), jurist , was the third son of Thomas Edward Dicey ( b. 1789) , proprietor of the Northampton Mercury , and his wife, Anne Mary , younger daughter of James Stephen , master in chancery , and was born at the family home, Claybrook Hall , near Lutterworth, Leicestershire , on 4 February 1835. The name Venn was given to him in honour of the leader of the Clapham sect John Venn , whose daughter Jane had married Anne Dicey's brother, Sir James Stephen. Obstetrical error at birth caused a muscular weakness that plagued Dicey

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Dicey, Edward James Stephen ( 1832–1911 ), author and journalist , born on 15 May 1832 at Claybrook Hall, Claybrook , near Lutterworth, Leicestershire , was the second son of Thomas Edward Dicey ( b. 1789) , of an old Leicestershire family, who was senior wrangler at Cambridge in 1811, was a pioneer of the Midland Railway , and owned the Northampton Mercury. Dicey's mother, Anne Mary , sister of Sir James Stephen , was aunt of Sir James Fitzjames Stephen and Sir Leslie Stephen. His younger brother was Albert Venn Dicey. Educated at home and,

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educational theorist among the dissenters. Watts , who was to become the third key influence on Doddridge's development after Clark and Jennings , was impressed by the account and thought him a suitable person to continue the academy. On 10 April 1729 at a meeting of ministers in Lutterworth , Some proposed the establishment of the new academy at Market Harborough under Doddridge. Though he had initially refused Saunders's request, after seeking advice from Calamy among others Doddridge began teaching a small group of students at Whitsuntide 1729. This was

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'History of Orlando the Fair' printed in The Tatler in August 1709. Feilding was ultimately reconciled with Mary Wadsworth , with whom he lived at Scotland Yard until his death from fever on 12 May 1712 aged sixty-one. He left her the bulk of his property, including estates at Lutterworth, Leicestershire , in his will.

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in other heresy trials in 1428. In the most notorious action of his pontificate, in the spring of 1428, Flemming at last implemented the sentence proclaimed at the Council of Constance on 4 May 1415, and had the supposed remains of John Wyclif ( d. 1384) disinterred from Lutterworth churchyard , burnt, and thrown into a nearby river. Less controversial was his foundation of a new college at Oxford. On 13 October 1427 Flemming received royal licence to unite the Oxford parishes of All Saints , St Michael Northgate , and St Mildred , as the basis for

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Devil Doubt, and a Doctor. The words attributed to St George in such productions show that here, too, he often struck a robustly patriotic note, sometimes British, in the company of Sts Patrick , David , and Andrew , and sometimes for England alone. In a play recorded at Lutterworth at Christmas 1863, for instance, he announces himself as the king of England's only son: I am Prince George, a worthy knight; I'll spend my blood for England's right. England's right I will maintain; I'll fight for old England once again. E. K. Chambers, Medieval Stage , 2

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took a BA in 1824 and an MA in 1827. After studying law he decided to take holy orders, and was ordained deacon in 1827 and priest in 1829 by the bishop of Lincoln. From 1827 to 1844 Gurney was curate of Lutterworth, Leicestershire — John Wyclif's last home—and from 1841 was chaplain to the Lutterworth poor-law union. Gurney's years at Lutterworth were crucial to his development as man and priest. On 20 December 1837 he preached a memorial sermon to Wyclif , whom he praised as the man who ' brought the book of God out of its hiding place and read it

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British Thomson-Houston works at Lutterworth, Leicestershire , but progress was stalled by the occurrence of combustion instabilities. Hawthorne's PhD research had found that, in rapid combustion, flames might contain eddies of unburnt gaseous fuel along with free oxygen. Previously it had been thought that fuel would burn completely as long as there was enough oxygen available. This research had a direct bearing on the combustion problems that Whittle was experiencing, and Hawthorne was sent to help Whittle at Lutterworth. His theoretical knowledge of fluid

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Holland, Joan Mary Crossley- [ née Joan Mary Cowper] ( 1912–2005 ), potter and gallery owner , was born on 3 April 1912 at Peatling Magna, Lutterworth, Leicestershire , the daughter of Claude Marriott Lovell Cowper , medical doctor, and his wife, Mary Bourne, née Collard , a nurse who was also a gifted amateur artist. Unusually she was educated at a Plymouth Brethren boys' school before going to Wycombe Abbey and the Central School of Arts and Crafts. She became a gifted potter, designed for Doulton , and was exhibited at Heal's and Liberty. Following

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apart. Hudson was presented to the rectory of Wirksworth in Derbyshire , in 1633, and to Uffington, Lincolnshire , in December 1638. In 1640 Market Bosworth, Leicestershire , and Greetham, Lincolnshire , and, by the king's gift, the mastership of St John's Hospital in Lutterworth were added to his clerical portfolio. As the living at Uffington was worth £140 – £160 per annum, and that of Market Bosworth some £300 – £400 , Hudson enjoyed a substantial income. (He is not to be confused with his Corpus Christi College, Cambridge , contemporary and

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identified it as relating to the writer rather than any other Richard Johnson. Thomas Seccombe , in his 1891 Dictionary of National Biography article, located the unseen baptismal record in London. A Richard Johnson , son of Richard Johnson of ' litelworthe ' (perhaps Lutterworth ), Leicestershire , was bound prentice to Richard Hancockes , merchant taylor, in 1584 and transferred in 1585 to Philip Dye ( Merchant Taylors' Company, apprentice binding books, vol. 1, fols. 23 a , 41 a ); and a Richard Johnson was made free of the Merchant Taylors by Peter

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Durham College in March 1449, in Lincoln College in July 1450 and January 1451, and in Coventry Hall in June and July 1452. Some sources say Kymer married before 1420, but left his wife so as to be able to take holy orders. He came to hold numerous livings, starting with Lutterworth in Leicestershire , and was successively treasurer and dean of Salisbury , where he died on 16 May 1463, and was buried in the cathedral; his effigy survives in the window of the south transept. His will, dated 14 October 1462, was proved on 12 July 1463 and shows him a wealthy

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had married and fathered at least three children. He first appears in 1223, as witness to a grant of property in Blewbury, Berkshire , involving Richard Poore , bishop of Salisbury ( d. 1237), and had been ordained subdeacon by 1231/2, when he was presented to the living of Lutterworth in Leicestershire by Nicholas de Verdun. The Verduns were subtenants of the earls of Winchester , and it may have been through his Verdun connection that Lovel entered the service of Roger de Quincy, earl of Winchester , lord of Galloway , and constable of Scotland

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W. P. Courtney

revised by Bonnie Shannon McMullen

Marriott, John ( 1780–1825 ), poet and Church of England clergyman , born at Cotesbach Hall, Cotesbach , near Lutterworth, Leicestershire , and baptized at Cotesbach church on 11 September 1780, was the third and youngest son of Robert Marriott DCL ( d. 1808) , rector of Cotesbach and Gilmorton , and his wife, Elizabeth ( d. 1819) , daughter and only child of George Stow of Walthamstow, Essex. He entered Rugby School at midsummer 1788, and matriculated from Christ Church, Oxford , on 10 October 1798. He was one of two who achieved first-class honours

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ordinary ' ( TNA: PRO, SP 16/434/57 ). Moore returned, under unknown circumstances, to the rectory of Knaptoft. It was one John Moore , minister of Knaptoft , who preached two sermons ' in the lecture at Lutterworth ', but this cannot have been the John Moore , incumbent of Clavering, Essex , between 1643 and 1662 who was appointed rector of Lutterworth in 1647 and who on 17 September that year complained of having been forcibly prevented from taking its possession. Neither is John Moore of Knaptoft the same man as the author of A Lost Ordinance Restored

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heir, Christopher , who was appointed to sit alongside his father on the Leicestershire bench between 1483 and 1485. Isobel died on 23 May 1476, and Neele married Agnes , daughter and heir of John Seyton of Martinsthorpe, Rutland , and widow of William Fielding of Lutterworth. But Neele was buried beside Isobel in Prestwold church , where his effigy, in judicial robes, survives on an incised tombstone slab.

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Blyth Spital in the same county. He had eight siblings. The family claimed descent from an ancient Scottish family, some members of which moved to England in the reign of James I and later settled at Clipstone Park, Nottinghamshire. Oliver attended his father's school in Lutterworth, Leicestershire , and perhaps another in Nottingham. In 1803 he became usher of the grammar school at Caistor, Lincolnshire. In 1805 he married Mary Ann (1785/6–1856) , daughter of Thomas Beverley. They had three sons and two daughters. From 1809 to 1826 Oliver was headmaster