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company (24 June 1779). At the end of 1780 Lord Glerawly , a local nobleman, resigned, demanding the return of the weapons that he had originally supplied to the company. Barber organized a subscription list, and with the help of donations from volunteer companies in Belfast , Lisburn , and Newry the Rathfriland corps was rearmed. This episode is indicative of the social tensions that emerged in Ulster during these years as the ‘independent interest’ sought to challenge the electoral dominance of the larger landowners. In the County Down election of 1783

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credited with preaching to the rebels, using as his text Ezekiel 9: 1, ' draw near, even every man with his destroying weapon in his hand '. He was arrested three days after the defeat of the rebels at Ballynahinch , and charged with rebellion and treason. At the court martial in Lisburn his enemies confidently expected him to be condemned and executed. However his brother Dr George Birch was captain of the Newtownards yeomen and had fought on the king's side at Saintfield. Dr Birch exerted his influence with the military authorities and it was arranged that

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Ernest Blythe ( 1889–1975 ) by unknown photographer , 1922 Getty Images Blythe, Ernest [Earnán de Blaghd] ( 1889–1975 ), politician and theatre director , was born on 13 April 1889 in Magheragall, Lisburn, co. Antrim , the eldest child of James and Agnes Blythe. He came from a Church of Ireland and staunchly Orange background and was a most unlikely convert to Irish nationalism. Educated at the local Molgaberry and Ballycarrickmaddy national schools, he joined the civil service in 1905 and was placed in the department of agriculture and technical

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However, the appointment of the more Laudian-inclined Henry Leslie as bishop of Down and Connor in 1635 saw a more concerted effort made against those among the Church of Ireland clergy who had presbyterian sympathies. At Leslie's primary visitation of his diocese, held at Lisburn in July 1636, he required subscription to the recently passed 1634 canons by the clergy of the diocese. Five, including Brice , refused to subscribe. A private conference was held in the hope of finding an accommodation, but no compromise could be reached. On 12 August 1636 the five

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January 1788, Susanna Hutton (1753–1819); they had twelve children, of whom four died in infancy. On 8 August 1779 Bruce was called to the congregation of Lisburn , and on 4 November he was ordained by the presbytery of Bangor , one of the most strongly New Light presbyteries in the General Synod of Ulster. His involvement in public affairs also began at this time, with his decision to join the Lisburn True Blues , the local volunteer company. On 24 March 1782 he received a call from his father's old congregation of Strand Street, Dublin , as colleague to

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Ulster , the son of John Bryson (1685–1788) , was probably born in Holywood, co. Down. He was licensed by the Armagh presbytery on 1 June 1762 and, after preaching at Banbridge in 1763–4, he was ordained minister of Lisburn by Bangor presbytery on 7 June 1764, giving a modified form of subscription. A new meeting-house was opened in Lisburn on 18 May 1766, Bryson's congregation using the Anglican church while the building was under way. In 1774 he accepted a call to Belfast's (non-subscribing) Second Congregation , on condition that he did not have to

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Bulloch, Terence Malcolm [ Terry ] ( 1916–2014 ), air force officer , was born at Montreagh, 1 Belsize Road, Lisburn, co. Antrim , on 19 February 1916 , the second son, twinned with a sister, of Samuel Arthur Bulloch , linen merchant, and his wife, Elizabeth (Elsie), née Larmor , who was from Huguenot stock. He was educated at Mourne Grange School, Kilkeel , and Campbell College, Belfast , and joined the RAF on a short service commission in 1936. He trained as a pilot before flying Ansons in Coastal Command. In early 1940 Bulloch transferred to

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development of his interiors. Castle is described as a man of the strictest integrity, though by temperament convivial, eccentric, and improvident. Intemperance and late hours were said to have caused the gout from which he suffered. He married Jane Truffet or Truphet ( d. 1744) of Lisburn, co. Antrim , at the Huguenot church in Dublin on 28 June 1733, but there were no children of the marriage. He died suddenly of a fit, when he was ' between fifty and sixty years old ' ( Anthologia Hibernica ), at Carton, co. Kildare , on 19 February 1751, and was buried in the

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Legacy of Husbandry , published between 1651 and 1655. Child advocated the systematic study of scientific agricultural methods and proposed schemes for state implementation of forest management and the cultivation of potatoes, flax, and hemp. Child left London to settle in Lisburn, co. Antrim , in Ireland in May 1651. On his arrival he began a botanical and entomological survey of the locality (sending specimens to his friend, a Mr Morgan , keeper of a ' kind of Botanicke garden ' close to Westminster Abbey , and an entomologist, Mr Marshall ). Child

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translation into Latin, accompanied by extensive commentary and a critical treatment of the author's life. He may also have assisted in the publication of a Hebrew grammar at the Oxford press in 1705. In June 1708 he preached at St Clement Danes in aid of sufferers from the fire at Lisburn; this was the first sermon that he published. Clavering began to advance in the church, becoming chaplain to Thomas Tenison , archbishop of Canterbury , who preferred him to the rectory of Hadley, Suffolk , in 1712. He was treasurer of St David's Cathedral from 1713 to 1725

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interest in science and mathematics, and several languages (Latin, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish). Conway was also a prolific and gossipy letter writer. An extensive correspondence with his secretary and agent in Ireland , George Rawdon , based mainly at Brookhill , near Lisburn, co. Antrim , survives. In 1639 Conway was able to use his long-standing connection with the lord deputy, Thomas Wentworth, Viscount Wentworth , to ensure that his brother-in-law Sir Robert Harley escaped the burden of the sheriffdom of Hertfordshire. Other correspondents included

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ability ' ( CSP dom. , 1667–8 , 258 ). However, he managed the transition reasonably well, successfully ingratiating himself with Arlington. Conway was much occupied with the administration of Ireland , where he spent a considerable portion of his time, having a fine estate at Lisburn, co. Antrim. He was made governor of Charlemont Fort in 1671, and extended his authority over the counties of Armagh , Tyrone , Monaghan , and part of Down from 1672. He was joint commissioner of the Irish customs , 1673–5, and held a commission as lieutenant-general of horse

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was created marquess of Hertford and earl of Yarmouth. The owner of extensive estates in co. Antrim , he also exerted influence in Irish politics. He served a relatively uneventful term as lord lieutenant in 1765–6 and had a decisive influence on elections in the borough of Lisburn , which was briefly shaken by the Volunteer movement in 1783. Hertford died on 14 June 1794 from complications resulting from a riding accident at the home of his daughter, the countess of Lincoln , in Putney. He was buried on 23 June at Arrow, Warwickshire , where his wife had

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passed on to his children. While his father was lord lieutenant of Ireland Beauchamp was made a privy councillor for Ireland (1765) and he acted as chief secretary to his father (1765–6) before his appointment as constable of Dublin Castle (1766–1822). He also represented Lisburn in the Irish House of Commons from 1761 to 1768. Beauchamp entered the British House of Commons in 1766 as member for Lostwithiel and during the Chatham government he followed the political line set by his uncle General Henry Seymour Conway. He was considered to be primarily

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of the most active buyers and feared opponents in the art market. He was appointed KG in 1846, on the recommendation of Sir Robert Peel , but the honour was criticized in the London press because of Hertford's disengagement from public life and from his Irish estates around Lisburn , the source of much of his income, which he visited only once, in 1845. Contemporaries did however have the highest opinion of Hertford's abilities. Lady Blessington observed: ' He has great natural talent and knowledge of the world, but uses both to little purpose, save to laugh

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households of royalty and the nobility. Coulson is first recorded as being in business in 1764 in premises near the bridge over the River Lagan in Lisburn , possibly in the buildings which had been occupied by the Huguenot Louis Crommelin , who had settled in the town in 1698 and developed fine plain-linen weaving. In 1766 Coulson was granted a lease on ground nearer the market house in the town centre by Lisburn's landlord, Francis Seymour-Conway, earl of Hertford. Here he erected buildings and installed looms. Lord Hertford's patronage was significant

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flour-mills, the linen bleaching business, and Dunville's Distillery, Belfast , and who made his fortune within twenty years. His mother, Eleanor Gilmore Browne ( b. 1835) , was the daughter of Robert Browne , a prosperous man who owned property in Belfast and a farm outside Lisburn, co. Antrim. They had eight sons and one daughter; James Craig was the seventh child and sixth son. He grew up in co. Down in Craigavon , a large house in grounds close to Belfast , and Tyrella , a house on Dundrum Bay. He was educated in a preparatory school near Craigavon

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the writer Elizabeth Hamilton. His brothers all entered the medical profession: John ( d. 1813) , who was a surgeon in the service of the East India Company and then physician at Demerara; Adair Crawford (1748–1795); and Alexander (1755/6–1823) , who was a physician in Lisburn. William Crawford studied for the ministry at Glasgow University , where he graduated MA in 1763 and received the degree of DD in 1784. On 6 February 1766 he was ordained minister of Strabane, co. Tyrone , a charge which had been vacant since the death of Victor Ferguson in

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kind permission of the Trustees of the National Museums & Galleries of Northern Ireland Crawford, William Sharman ( 1781–1861 ), politician and landlord in Ireland , was the eldest son of William Sharman ( d. 1803) , of Moira Castle, co. Down , a protestant landowner, MP for Lisburn (1783–90), and colonel of a union regiment of volunteers. His mother was Arminella , daughter of Hill Wilson of Purdysburn, co. Down. His father advanced progressive causes and also upheld the interests of the linen trade in the Irish House of Commons. Very little is known

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discouraging the Irish woollen trade, to do all in his power to encourage the linen manufactures of Ireland. With this view the king wrote to Crommelin , asking him to inquire into the condition of the French colony at Lisburn , and to outline the terms on which he would agree to act as director of the linen manufacture. Crommelin arrived at Lisburn in the autumn of 1698. He set out his ideas respecting the best mode of improving the linen industry in a memorial dated 16 April 1699, and addressed to the commissioners of the Treasury. The Treasury , together with