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Archdall, Mervyn ( 1723–1791 ), antiquary , was born in Dublin on 22 April 1723, the son of William Archdall , who was descended from a co. Fermanagh ascendancy family. He entered Trinity College, Dublin , in 1739 and, according to A. J. Webb , ' passed through the University with credit, and imbibed a taste for antiquities and literary research, and for collecting coins, medals and seals ' ( Webb , 5 ). He graduated BA in 1744 and MA in 1747. He married Sarah Collis ( d. 1782) , a relative of Richard Pococke , then archdeacon of Dublin , on 30 July 1747

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J. K. Laughton

revised by Andrew Lambert

Armstrong, Sir Alexander ( 1818–1899 ), naval medical officer , descended from a family originally of Cumberland , and from Major-General John Armstrong (1673–1742) , was born in Donegal , the son of Alexander Armstrong of Croghan Lodge, co. Fermanagh. He studied medicine at Trinity College, Dublin , and at Edinburgh University (MD 1841, LRCS Edinburgh 1841), and entered the navy as an assistant surgeon on 21 March 1842. After a few months at Haslar Hospital and in the flagship at Portsmouth he was appointed in June to the Polyphemus , a small

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R. J. Rowlette

revised by Susan Snoxall

Atthill, Lombe ( 1827–1910 ), obstetrician and gynaecologist , born on 3 December 1827 at Ardess, Magheraculmoney, co. Fermanagh, Ireland , was the youngest of ten surviving children of William Atthill (1774–1847) and his wife, Henrietta Margaret Eyre , eldest daughter of George Maunsell , dean of Leighlin. Atthill's elder brother, John Henry Grey Atthill , became chief justice of St Lucia. His father, from a Norfolk family, after graduating in 1795 as second wrangler and Smith's prizeman, became a fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge ,

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was not properly divorced from his first wife and consistently refused to pay the £1000 dowry to O'Neill. Bagenal kept a journal of the military campaign of the autumn of 1593. In September he led his soldiers into Monaghan again, attacking the McMahons en route for Fermanagh to repulse Hugh Maguire , whose forces had recently defeated Sir Richard Bingham. Maguire's defences at the Erne fords near Beleek were broken. Bagenal left troops under Captain Dowdall to consolidate his hold over Enniskillen , captured on 2 February 1594 after a nine-day

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intrepid motorcyclist and an excellent sportsman. After attending a small kindergarten school run by Miss Ida and Miss Pauline Elsner in nearby Stillorgan , Beckett went to private schools, first Earlsfort House in Dublin , then Portora Royal School in Enniskillen, co. Fermanagh , where his elder brother, Frank , was already a boarder. He entered Trinity College, Dublin , in 1923 and read French and Italian in the modern European literature course. It is often forgotten that he also studied English literature for two years with the Shakespeare scholar

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G. C. Boase

revised by James Lunt

Bell, Sir George ( 1794–1877 ), army officer , son of George Bell , of Belle Vue , on Lough Erne, co. Fermanagh , and Catherine , daughter of Dominick Nugent MP , was born at Belle Vue on 17 March 1794. The genealogist Henry Nugent Bell was his elder brother. While still at school in Dublin , George was gazetted an ensign in the 34th foot , on 11 March 1811. Sent to Portugal , he carried the colours of his regiment for the first time in the action of Arroyo dos Molinos; he was present at the second and final siege of Badajoz , and in the majority

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Gordon Goodwin

revised by Myfanwy Lloyd

Bell, Henry Nugent ( 1792–1822 ), genealogist , was the eldest son of George Bell , of Belle Vue, co. Fermanagh , and Catherine , daughter of Dominick Nugent MP. He followed the profession of a legal antiquary, and, in order to obtain a recognized status, entered himself at the Inner Temple on 17 November 1818. In the same year he acquired considerable distinction and celebrity by his successful advocacy of the claim of Hans Francis Hastings to the long-dormant earldom of Huntingdon; the estates, however, with the exception, it was said, of a mill in

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be required to help extirpate the recalcitrant Irish and make the plantation profitable and successful both for the settlers and the crown. In 1611 he received 2000 acres at Clancally in co. Fermanagh , and in 1612, with thirty-nine others, appealed to the lord deputy, Sir Arthur Chichester , to grant them jointly a part of Sligo , 60,000 acres in co. Fermanagh , and some neighbouring territory, on their undertaking to expend £40,000 on the land, and to settle upon it 1000 ' able men furnished for all kinds of handiwork '. In his signature to this appeal

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seventh marquess of Lothian at Mounteviot ( c.1830; abandoned for lack of money after the office wing was built). There were subsequent commissions for country seats at Latimer, Hertfordshire (1832–7), for Lord Cavendish; Merton Hall, Norfolk (1832–5); Crom Castle, co. Fermanagh (1832–8), for Lord Erne at a cost of £26,600; Isleworth House, Middlesex (1833–4), for W. H. Cooper; and Orford Court, Shoreham, Kent (1833–9; dem. c.1955), for H. St J. Mildmay. Major work—new or rebuilding, remodelling, or enlargement—followed at Pull Court, Wor

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seen Bodley's reports and may have wanted his advice on forts in the plantations. Part of his professional duties was the surveying of land and in 1609 he helped William Parsons , surveyor-general, survey the six escheated counties of Ulster — Tyrone , Armagh , Coleraine , Fermanagh , Cavan , and Donegal —but he took full honours for himself and his assistants in the production of a coloured set of maps within sixty-seven days. In 1611 he petitioned for ' some competent allowance during the few days that he has to live ' but in the same breath offered to survey

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born at 5 Penwortham Hill, Penwortham, Preston, Lancashire , on 2 August 1907, the son of Frederick Charles Bond (1873–1963) , a clothing maker who became a well-known local historian and artist, and his wife, Margaret Ellen, née Morphy ( c.1876–1957) , from Ballinamallard, Fermanagh, Ireland. He had one sibling, a younger brother, Frederick Bond (1910–1997). The family lived in the Broadgate area of Preston , close to the centre of the town and Lawrie (as he was known) was educated at Preston grammar school and afterwards served an apprenticeship. In

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of Colebrooke in co. Fermanagh , and his wife, Alice Sophia Bellingham ( d. 1920) , second daughter of Sir Alan Edward Bellingham, third baronet , of Castle Bellingham in co. Louth. On both sides of the family his roots lay deep in the Irish protestant ascendancy. The first Brooke of Colebrooke , Sir Henry Brooke of Donegal , was the son of an Elizabethan captain of Cheshire origin, and had been rewarded for his part in suppressing the native rising of 1641 by the grant of Colebrooke and 30,000 acres of co. Fermanagh. From that time until

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H. M. Stephens

revised by John Sweetman

Brooke, Sir Arthur ( 1772–1843 ), army officer , was the third son of Francis Brooke ( d. 1800) of Colebrooke, co. Fermanagh , and his wife, Hannah ( d. 1819) , daughter of Henry Prittie of Dunally, co. Tipperary , and sister of the first Lord Dunally. His elder brother was Sir Henry Brooke (1770–1834) , MP for County Fermanagh , who was created a baronet in 1822. Arthur Brooke entered the army as an ensign in the 44th foot on 31 October 1792 and was promoted lieutenant on 26 November 1793. In 1794–5 he served with the 44th in Flanders and

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), prime minister of Northern Ireland , was born on 9 June 1888 at Colebrooke Park, co. Fermanagh, Ireland , the eldest of five children (three sons and two daughters) of Sir Arthur Douglas Brooke, fourth baronet (1865–1907) , of Colebrooke , and his wife, Gertrude Isabella ( d. 1918) , only daughter of Stanlake Batson , of Horseheath, Cambridgeshire. He succeeded his father as fifth baronet on 27 November 1907. His social class, family background, and co. Fermanagh upbringing exerted a powerful formative influence on him. His family first moved to Ireland

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Brooke, Robert ( 1744–1811 ), army officer in the East India Company and colonial governor , was the second son of Robert Brooke (1710–1784) , an artist, of Rantavan, co. Cavan , and his wife and cousin, Honor ( d. 1800) , daughter of Henry Brooke , rector of Kinawley, co. Fermanagh. In 1764 he was commissioned ensign in Ironside's battalion of sepoys (10th) in the East India Company's Bengal army. He was promoted lieutenant on 25 August 1765 and entered on a hard, campaigning life. He took part in the operations against Mir Kasima and Shuja ud-Daula

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salary with journalism, and in 1893 published his first book, The Awkward Squads. Most of Bullock's novels are set in the co. Fermanagh – co. Cavan borderland, drawing on family tradition and memories of his youth. Neither Dublin nor Belfast , nor even the county town of Enniskillen , feature in his work. His territory, overshadowed by ' My Lord the mountain ' ( Slíab Rushen, south co. Fermanagh ) extends from Lisnaskea, co. Fermanagh (' Lismahee ') to the market towns of ' Bunn ' ( Belturbet, co. Cavan ) and ' Glann ' ( Cavan Town ), with occasional visits

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1911–1993 ) by Godfrey Argent , 1973 Godfrey Argent Studios / Royal Society Burkitt, Denis Parsons ( 1911–1993 ), surgeon and geographical epidemiologist , was born at Alexander Terrace, Enniskillen, co. Fermanagh, Ireland , on 28 February 1911, the elder of the two sons of James Parsons Burkitt (1870–1959) , an engineer and county surveyor for Fermanagh , and his wife, Gwendolyn Hill (1878–1960) , daughter of Henry William Hill , from the city of Cork. He started his education at Portora Royal School, Enniskillen , but at the age of eleven an accident led

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mathematics. In 1900 Burkitt was appointed county surveyor in Fermanagh , a post he held until he retired in 1940. Those four decades coincided with the introduction of motorized transport in Fermanagh , leading to a need for greatly improved roads, and Burkitt was credited with introducing tarmacadam surfacing to the county. The use of steam-rollers, providing much smoother roads, was another of his innovations. The other significant event during these decades was the partition of Ireland , Fermanagh being one of the six counties that remained within the United

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H. M. Stephens

revised by Rosemary Richey

Caldwell, Hume ( 1735–1762 ), army officer in the Austrian service , was born in Castle Caldwell, co. Fermanagh, Ireland , the third son of the eight children of Sir John Caldwell, second baronet ( d. 1744) , landowner, and Ann , eldest daughter of the Revd John Trench , dean of Raphoe , and his wife, Anne Warburton. The possibility that he may have been an illegitimate child of a Catholic tenant, who later received money, has been questioned by recent historians. Caldwell entered the Austrian army at the age of fifteen, thus following the example of his

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not Carolan's ), most likely assisted by his close friend, fellow clergyman, and remarkable Irish scholar Anthony Raymond , vicar of Trim. Swift may well have known Carolan —as claimed by folklore—but this cannot be proven. Carolan married Mary Maguire ( d. 1733) of co. Fermanagh. They had a loving marriage, living at Mohill, co. Leitrim , where a public sculpture in bronze by Oisín Kelly was erected in memory of the harper. They had six daughters and a son. The latter became a harper (of little distinction), and later went to London bringing his father's