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c.1822–1878) , a country gentleman, and his wife, Catherine Anne (1829×31–1922) , daughter of the Revd Thomas Coats Cane of Nottinghamshire. Married in 1859, Allenby's parents, after the death of Hynman Allenby's father in 1861, established the family home at Felixstowe House, Felixstowe, Suffolk (subsequently demolished); they also bought an estate in Norfolk of some 2000 acres. Brought up the son of a country squire in the countryside, away from the cities, Allenby loved nature and developed a keen knowledge of flora and fauna, a passion that would

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wife, Charlotte Augusta, née Boyle ( c.1882–1970). Her father served as a naval intelligence officer during the First World War and died in Belgium shortly after it ended while still on active service. Her mother subsequently became a property dealer. She was educated at Felixstowe College, Suffolk , St James's Secretarial College, London , and from 1933 to 1936 at the Central School of Speech Training and Dramatic Art under the charismatic Elsie Fogerty. While still at the Central School Anderson successfully auditioned at the BBC to read poetry

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patronizing Earls Colne Priory, Essex , and the abbeys of Wymondham, Norfolk , and Rochester, Kent. He made grants to monasteries at Bungay, Suffolk , Carrow, Norfolk , Hickling, Norfolk , Leiston, Suffolk , and Sibton, Suffolk , as well as to the two cells of Rochester at Felixstowe, Suffolk , and at Harwich, Essex. All these grants mark him as a conventionally pious man of his age. Roger (II)'s period as earl of Norfolk was clearly a success, notwithstanding his being on the wrong side in the civil war against King John. His father, Hugh (I) , had

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J. De Graaff-Hunter

revised by Yolande Hodson

on ' rather out of touch with the scientific world '. He proceeded with a second geodetic levelling of the United Kingdom , creating ' fundamental ' bench marks which have been of lasting value. He also established three mean-sea level tidal stations—at Dunbar , Newlyn , and Felixstowe , of which the second remains in operation. Close also turned his attention to the cartography of the Ordnance Survey with the intention of revolutionizing the appearance of the one-inch map. His first attempt, the Killarney District map (1913), was crowned with success.

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Quarterly Journal of Microscopic Science. A paper on the origin of mammals, based on investigations of fossils from Lyme Regis in Dorset , put forward a theory on the bone structure of animals with the power of springing movement. Other contributions discussed cetacean fossils from Felixstowe in Suffolk , and evidence for the origin of birds from fossils found at Stonesfield. In 1860, at the Oxford meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science , he delivered a paper on pterodactyl flight, based on researches into fossils from the Cambridgeshire

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Thomas Eldred's marriage to Susan ( d. 1638) , daughter of Henry Aldham ( c.1530–1608) , mariner, of St Mary Quay parish , later keeper of The Angel inn on the Quay. From Aldham in 1608 the Eldreds inherited lands in Falkenham , Trimley , and Kirton , all near Felixstowe. Thomas's sister Sara married Richard Burlingham , a fellow Ipswich mariner. From 1595 onwards Eldred was elected to various offices, but presumably because he needed his freedom to travel he paid fines to avoid them. In 1600 he was recommended by John Eldred of Great

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at the approach to the Royal Lodge, Windsor Great Park , for George VI. Unluckily these were damaged by a bomb soon after completion and the design was altered in the course of reconstruction by another hand. With Hilda Mason (1880–1955) he designed the church of St Andrew, Felixstowe (1931); this intriguing early work combined a Perpendicular plan with a concrete frame and brick panels. With the outbreak of war the practice was wound up and in 1940 Erith bought a farm with 150 acres of arable land at Little Bromley, Essex. He farmed successfully until

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Sigeberht , who had adopted Christianity while in exile in Francia , may have been decisive in bringing Felix to East Anglia. Felix was given a see at ‘Dommoc’ , which is usually identified with Dunwich , now largely disappeared beneath the sea, but may equally have been Felixstowe , or somewhere else. Felix helped Sigeberht to establish a school ' where boys could be taught letters ' ( Bede , Hist. eccl. , 3.18 ), providing the king with teachers. The notion that this was at Soham is late and unreliable. Sigeberht himself abdicated the kingship and

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died eight months later at Ipswich Hospital on 27 August 1995. His funeral was held at Tuddenham church, Suffolk , and there was a memorial service in London at St Bride's, Fleet Street. A statue of Grandma, Vera, and Butch the dog was unveiled in Ipswich in 1993, while at Felixstowe the support and rescue boat Grandma was launched in May 1999.

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with a second-class degree in 1949, he spent his national service in the RAF , indulging his boyhood love of aviation. He was posted to RAF Felixstowe , and was quickly appointed the station's education officer. After two years' service he returned to London and joined the advertising firm of Saward Baker as an account director. Gillies's general knowledge was already exceptional. According to a colleague at Felixstowe ' he had a wide and deep knowledge of history, politics, world affairs, cricket, literature, music, art, religions, philosophy—and he could

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and Lerwick, and even a float-plane version of the Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire. In March 1944 Hamilton was on board a disastrous seaplane test flight which crashed, killing his supervisor; he survived with only minor injuries. When the MAEE returned to its pre-war base at Felixstowe, Suffolk , at the end of the war in 1945, he continued to work on seaplanes. On 5 September 1947, at King's Park Church, Glasgow , he married Christina Mary Warnock McKean ( b. 1924) , schoolteacher, and daughter of Robert McKean , commercial traveller. They had three sons, but

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Sir John Hayward ( 1564 ? –1627 ) by Willem de Passe , pubd 1630 © National Portrait Gallery , London Hayward, Sir John ( 1564 ? –1627 ), historian and civil lawyer , was born in Felixstowe, Suffolk , or in nearby Walton , where a John Haywarde , possibly his father, held modest property. Felixstowe parish subsidized Hayward's education at Pembroke College, Cambridge , where he graduated BA in 1581 and MA in 1584. In 1591 he became a doctor of laws, the statutory qualification for the practice of civil law in which he was actively engaged throughout his

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1861, aged nine, and Francis Edward , who succeeded as second baron, and five daughters. Howard died, after a long illness, on 1 December 1883 at his London house, 19 Rutland Gate, Knightsbridge , and was buried at Hadfield, Derbyshire. His second wife died of influenza at Felixstowe on 7 December 1909.

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while his wife, Barbara , became groom of the stole to Queen Catherine. In 1661 he became colonel of the Suffolk regiment of militia horse, and it was in this capacity that he mobilized and took personal command of the forces which repelled an assault by 2000 Dutch troops near Felixstowe on 3 July 1667. In 1666 he agreed to sell his vast palace at Audley End to Charles II for £50,000 , while retaining the bulk of the estate, and in March 1667 was himself appointed keeper of the king's new house. However, although Suffolk was in 1673 appointed joint commissioner

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had to preside at an unusual, difficult, and important college meeting to consider whether Trinity should support a parliamentary bill providing for the (then) small port of Felixstowe to expand significantly up-river towards Ipswich onto adjacent Trinity -owned farmland. After a long debate a motion supporting the bill was passed—a crucial early step in the transformation of Felixstowe Dock into the largest container port in Britain. Later Huxley presided over important college meetings dealing with the creation of Blue Boar Court on the site of the

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passed at Johnson's death to his successor, but not partner, in business, Benjamin Moulton; the former are now in the J. S. Earle collection at the Society of Antiquaries and the latter at Suffolk Record Office in Ipswich. The most elaborate surveys (for example, of Felixstowe , Walton , and the Trimleys , 1784, and of Great Saxham , 1801) include books with finished drawings of all the estate properties. Johnson painted a series of remarkable trees in Norfolk and Suffolk , some hollow, and a few inhabited. For portraits, and a conversation piece

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J. K. Laughton

revised by Andrew Lambert

Jones, George Matthew ( c. 1785–1831 ), naval officer and traveller , was the son of John Jones , general superintendent of Landguard Fort, Felixstowe , and his wife, Mary, née Roberts; General Sir John Thomas Jones, first baronet , and Lieutenant-General Sir Harry David Jones were his brothers. On 28 April 1802 he was promoted lieutenant in the navy. He was appointed to the Amphion , in which, in the following spring, Nelson went out to the Mediterranean , and which, on 5 October 1804, assisted in the capture of the Spanish treasure ships off Cape

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R. H. Vetch

revised by Roger T. Stearn

Jones, Sir Harry David ( 1791–1866 ), army officer , the youngest son of John Jones (1751–1806) , of Welsh descent, 29th foot , superintendent of Landguard Fort, Felixstowe, Suffolk , and of Cranmer Hall, Fakenham, Norfolk , and his wife, Mary ( d. 1816) , daughter of John Roberts , 29th foot , was born at Landguard Fort on 14 March 1791. Sir John Thomas Jones (1783–1843) was his eldest brother. Another elder brother was George Matthew Jones (c. 1785–1831). He joined the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich , on 10 April 1805, and on leaving became candidate

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R. H. Vetch

revised by Roger T. Stearn

Jones, Sir John Thomas, first baronet ( 1783–1843 ), army officer , eldest of five sons of John Jones (1751–1806) , of Welsh descent, 29th foot , general superintendent at Landguard Fort, Felixstowe, Suffolk , and of Cranmer Hall, Fakenham, Norfolk , and his wife, Mary ( d. 1816) , daughter of John Roberts of the 29th foot , was born at Landguard Fort on 25 March 1783. George Matthew Jones (c. 1785–1831) and Sir Harry David Jones (1791–1866) were his brothers. He was educated at Ipswich grammar school , joined the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich

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commanding and lieutenant-governor of Guernsey. He was appointed CB in 1908, KCB in 1916, and KCMG in 1918. After retirement in 1920 Kiggell worked on the official history of the war, but had to give it up on health grounds in 1923. He died at his home, Camas, Croutel Road , in Felixstowe , on 23 February 1954, after a retirement of more than thirty years. Much of the criticism of Kiggell is based on the fact that, like several other senior officers, he had held no command in the field. There is no doubt that he was a solid, effective administrator, not one to grab