1-17 of 17 Results

  • Place Mentioned: Dawley x
Clear all

Article

family. The Rohan affair was a sharp, unforgettable lesson in the arbitrary powers of class privilege. Voltaire was in London from 11 May 1726 until the autumn of 1728. With letters of introduction from Horatio Walpole , he stayed in Bolingbroke's houses in Pall Mall and Dawley , near Uxbridge , meeting Alexander Pope and John Gay , who welcomed him to his house in Whitehall and introduced him to Colley Cibber and the London theatre world. At Drury Lane he saw Hamlet , Julius Caesar , Richard III , and Othello , and was provided with scripts

Article

Little is known about her early years. Her notebooks provide fleeting references to her activities: she was in Paris in October 1668 , but for the most part her whereabouts are elusive. On 11 May 1673 she married Sir John Bennet ( 1616–1695 ) of Pall Mall, Westminster , and Dawley, Harlington, Middlesex. Her husband served in parliament between 1663 and 1678 but owed much of his political success to the influence of his powerful brother, Henry Bennet , first earl of Arlington. Sir John accrued significant wealth thanks to his appointment to several

Article

collection. Photograph: Photographic Survey, Courtauld Institute of Art , London Bennet, Henry, first earl of Arlington ( bap. 1618, d. 1685 ), politician , was baptized at Little Saxham, Suffolk , on 6 September 1618, the second son of Sir John Bennet (1589–1658) , landowner, of Dawley, Harlington, Middlesex , and Dorothy , daughter of Sir John Crofts of Little Saxham. He was educated at Westminster School until 1635 and then went up to Christ Church, Oxford; he graduated BA in 1639, proceeded MA in May 1642, and gained the reputation of a scholar and poet

Article

high court of delegates , which heard appeals from the ecclesiastical and admiralty courts. In 1605 he was appointed to the court of high commission , and was reappointed in successive commissions in 1608, 1611, 1613, and 1620. His purchase of the manors of Harlington and Dawley , in Middlesex , in 1607 showed his rapidly growing wealth and social status. The following year he was made a master in chancery , one of the senior officials in the court of chancery , and in May 1609 he took part in a debate before the king, in which he defended rights of the

Article

and mythological subjects and the promotion of the virtues of country life, leading to that ' Farm-like Way of Gardening ' advocated by Switzer in his Ichnographia rustica ( appendix to vol. 3, 1742 ). This in turn may have prompted the fermes ornées found on estates such as Dawley in Middlesex , where Bridgeman may have assisted Henry St John, first Viscount Bolingbroke , from about 1723. Bridgeman was able to combine work on such private landscapes with his official post as royal gardener; the extent of his duties at the various royal gardens was laid

Article

y mining the walls. In addition he organized ordnance supplies in Staffordshire and Worcestershire and was general of ordnance to Prince Maurice and then Lord Astley , being taken at the fall of Worcester. In 1648 he mustered 200 men in Boscobel Woods in order to seize Dawley Castle, Shropshire , but they were captured by Andrew Yarranton; he was imprisoned but escaped, and was retaken in London , again escaping the day before he was due to be shot. For the next two years he lived at Bristol under a false name, Dr Hunt. Unable to compound for his

Article

difficult to repair. However, Bolingbroke did commend him for his attitude to the ‘bribery act’, which was bound to have consequences for his constituency. In this letter of June 1736 Bolingbroke also expressed surprise at Knight's decision to decline purchasing his house at Dawley , near Uxbridge, Middlesex , from him, to sell his town house in Grosvenor Street , to retire into Warwickshire , to put his son to school in Chelsea , and to send his daughter to reside with Viscount St John. Unknown to Bolingbroke , these decisions were prompted by Knight's

Article

London's virtuosity in the design of parterres, the creation of waterworks, and the planting of avenues, specialities which culminated in the huge works at Bretby House and Chatsworth in the 1680s and 1690s. If Longleat was the first of London's parterre designs, the scheme at Dawley (1695) perfected the style. However, nothing in England could match the stupendous parterre dug out of the hill at New Park, Richmond (1692), where London concurrently designed a forest garden, prophetic of the early liberated style at Wray Wood, Castle Howard. At Cholmondeley

Article

her birthplace throughout her life. Edith attended the local Church of England elementary school at Dawley , a mile away from Horsehay , and then the Coalbrooke County High School for Girls as a scholarship pupil. Particularly interested in English, Latin, and history, she successfully gained her Oxford school certificate and left school in 1930 determined to become a writer. From 1933 to 1940 she lived at home and worked at a chemist's shop in Dawley , where she accumulated a knowledge of drugs and poisons which would feature later in her detective fiction

Article

Samuel Peploe ( bap. 1667, d. 1752 ) by John Faber junior (after Hamlet Winstanley , 1733 ) Ashmolean Museum , Oxford Peploe, Samuel ( bap. 1667, d. 1752 ), bishop of Chester and religious controversialist , the son of Podmore Peploe , was baptized at Dawley Parva in Shropshire on 29 July 1667. Following attendance at Penkridge School in Staffordshire he matriculated as a batteler of Jesus College, Oxford , on 12 May 1687, graduating BA on 12 March 1691 and proceeding MA in 1693. After he had taken holy orders, his preferment was rapid: in 1695

Article

Sir Joseph Simpson ( 1909–1968 ) by unknown photographer , 1959 The Metropolitan Police Historical Collection Simpson, Sir Joseph ( 1909–1968 ), police officer , was born at Doseley, Dawley, Shropshire , on 26 June 1909, the second of four children and the elder of two sons of Joseph Simpson (1875–1952) , mechanical engineer, and his wife, (Ann Mary) Dorothea (Dora), née Maw (1874–1950). He was educated at Oundle School and at Manchester College of Technology , where he studied textile engineering with the intention of entering the cotton industry. He

Article

were delighted and so were a group of tories led by Wyndham and Bathurst. Other tories, especially the crypto-Jacobites and the friends of the late earl of Oxford , were not ready to welcome him with open arms and the whigs in power never trusted him. Bolingbroke settled at Dawley , near Uxbridge, Middlesex , where he initially gave the impression of retiring from the political scene, but he very soon sought to rally the tory opposition in parliament and to ally it with the discontented whigs led by William Pulteney , who had recently resigned from Walpole's

Article

with Pope in London , and during the next two weeks Arbuthnot accompanied him on visits to Lord Chesterfield , the earl of Pulteney , and Bolingbroke —who in April 1725 had returned from exile in France and was soon affecting to praise the life of Horatian retirement at his Dawley farm, near Uxbridge —and again with Pope at Twickenham. On 7 April Swift had an audience with the princess of Wales at Leicester House , and probably met Henrietta Howard , mistress of the prince of Wales and, after 1724, Pope's neighbour at Marble Hill, Twickenham

Article

January 1810, left his wife, Elizabeth Wilshin ( d. 1843) , a wealthy widow; she survived him by thirty-three years. Of Edmund and Elizabeth's children, little is known of the daughter, Elizabeth; the youngest son, George [i] (1792–1853) , managed the firm's stud farm at Dawley , near Uxbridge , after getting into financial difficulties as a farmer in Norfolk. He married Eliza Reeve of Wighton, Norfolk; they had three children, including Edmund [iv] (1816–1898). The second son, Edmund [iii] (1789–1851) , a lifelong bachelor, was a partner in the

Article

Allowed back into the castle, on the pretext of persuading it to surrender, he failed to re-emerge, and within a fortnight defeated Sir John Price at Welshpool. During the winter Vaughan was made general of Shropshire. He had put his troops into garrisons all over the county—at Dawley House , Lilleshall Abbey , Caws Castle , Leigh Hall , and High Ercall —with his parson brother commanding Shrawardine itself. Unscrupulously living off the country and confiscating the property of local parliamentarians, the best-documented example being his robbery from the

Article

Matthew Webb [ Captain Webb ] ( 1848–1883 ) by Elliott & Fry , c. 1875 © National Portrait Gallery , London Webb, Matthew [ known as Captain Webb] ( 1848–1883 ), swimmer , was born on 18 January 1848 at Dawley, Shropshire , one of a family of twelve children of Matthew Webb (1813–1876) , a country doctor, and his wife, Sarah. By the age of eight he had learned to swim in the River Severn below Ironbridge , and shortly afterwards he saved the life of his younger brother, who almost drowned when attempting to swim across the river. At the age of twelve

Article

Ernest Clarke

revised by P. W. King

( Yarranton , 1.193 ). He joined the parliamentary army, becoming a captain by 1645, serving in the garrison at Madeley, Shropshire , and perhaps later at Hartlebury Castle. In 1648 he discovered a cavalier plot by Colonel Dud Dudley and others to capture Madeley Court and Dawley Castle, Shropshire , resulting in the capture of the conspirators and their imprisonment at Hartlebury Castle, Worcestershire , for which he was awarded £500 by parliament. From 1651 to 1653 he was a commissioner for sequestrations in Worcestershire. Earlier, in 1651, with fellow