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the influence of William Dodsworth , became a committed Tractarian. From 1840 to 1842 he was examining chaplain to Dr Blomfield , bishop of London , but the latter found Allies's Tractarian sympathies uncongenial and in June 1842 relegated him to the living of Launton , near Bicester. His pugnacious disposition, which along with his small stature and dapper appearance won him among his friends the nickname of the Bantam Cock , did not endear him to his episcopal superiors. On 1 October 1840 he married Eliza Hall Newman , the sister of Thomas Harding Newman

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Portsmouth ', where he arrived on 17 April. There his fellow prisoners included Vavasor Powell. In January 1666 it was reported that he refused to sue for pardon, but on 9 November 1667 a warrant was issued for his discharge. In 1669 a man of his name was reported to be preaching at Bicester in Oxfordshire , at Westbury in Buckinghamshire , at Wanlip in Leicestershire , and at Burton Dassett and Priors Marston in Warwickshire. In May 1671 he was sentenced at Middlesex sessions to detention in Newgate during the king's pleasure for refusing to take the

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to Australia , leaving Bargate and her elder brother Simon for four years in the care of their father. When her mother returned it was with a new husband, Clarke Taylor , a Royal Air Force doctor, who installed his new family in air force bases at Hornchurch, Essex , and Bicester, Oxfordshire , and dispatched his stepdaughter to a succession of boarding-schools and holiday homes. In later years she described her upbringing as that of a ' middle-class charity child ' ( private information ). On leaving school Bargate trained as a nurse at the Westminster

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Gilbert Marshal ( d. 1241) , Richard Marshal's brother and heir. He died as the result of a hunting accident in July or August 1241. He had at some time previously bestowed property on Blackmore Priory in Essex and the Basset family foundation of an Augustinian priory at Bicester in Oxfordshire where he had chosen to be buried. His wife, Isabella , outlived him; she married Reginald de Mohun of Dunster ( d. 1258) and died c.1260. Basset's infant son died within a few weeks of his father, on 22 August 1241, so that the family estate passed to

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the merchants, which she would satisfy. In 1246 she was at law, defending her tenure of the double hundred of Bullingdon , which had traditionally been attached to the manor of Headington. Philippa remained unmarried and died shortly before 29 November 1265. She was buried at Bicester Priory , which had been founded by Gilbert Basset and endowed by members of the family. She had given the canons 7 s. rent at Horton for a light to burn before the altar of St John the Baptist in their conventual church, which benefaction was made for her soul and those of

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Rutland Boughton ( 1878–1960 ) by Herbert Lambert , 1921 © Jenny Letton, administered by Composer Prints Ltd.; collection National Portrait Gallery , London Boughton, Rutland ( 1878–1960 ), composer , was born in Bicester Road, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire , on 23 January 1878, the elder son in a family of two boys and one girl of William Rutland Boughton (1841–1905) , a grocer at 37 Buckingham Street , and his wife, Grace Martha (1845–1924) , the daughter of Francis Bishop , an innkeeper. Although he was educated at the Aylesbury grammar school , he was

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1902, and extra equerry to Edward VII in 1903 and to George V in 1910. After his retirement from public service Bradford acted as chairman of a committee to inquire into the wages of postal servants, but his chief interest was hunting. He hunted several days a week with the Bicester , Warwickshire , Heythrop , and Whaddon chase hounds. He died suddenly at his house in London , 50 South Audley Street, Westminster , on 13 May 1911 and was buried four days later in the churchyard at Chawton, Hampshire , beside his first wife, who had died in 1896. In 1898

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year, and on each occasion men and commander performed admirably. At Burford on 1 January 1643 they drove a band of local parliamentarians out of the town; a halberd blow laid open Byron's left cheek and left a prominent scar. On 6 May they routed another party of enemies at Bicester. Sir John was given command of the right wing of the cavalry force which destroyed Waller's army at Roundway Down on 13 July, and led it to the attack with distinction. At Newbury on 20 September he had charge of the equivalent wing of the royal army itself, and gained control

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neurosurgical units, to operate close to the action, and was also responsible for introducing specially designed crash helmets for army motorcyclists, thereby dramatically reducing their injuries. He set up rehabilitation centres for head-injured patients at Middleton Park , near Bicester , and Tusmore Park , and from at least 1943 worked with Howard Florey in assessing the value of penicillin in treating and preventing wound infection. Cairns was president of the section of neurology of the Royal Society of Medicine , and later presided over the Society of

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domestics ' ( ibid., 2.224 ). Against his own judgement, Calamy was encouraged by Oldfield to begin preaching before he was twenty-one. After reluctantly supplying for Oldfield , he was pressed to preaching at other places in the neighbourhood of Oxford , most frequently at Bicester for the elderly Henry Cornish , and on one occasion at Caversfield ' in the public church in the afternoon ' ( ibid., 2.301 ). He declined an invitation to become minister at Andover. Calamy returned to London in 1692 and preached frequently about the City , waiting until

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using as models the antique Borghese and Medici vases. After working briefly for Francis Bird , Delvaux joined forces about 1723 with Scheemakers , working from premises at Millbank, Westminster. Together they provided the wall monument to Sir Thomas Grantham ( c.1723?) in Bicester church, Oxfordshire , and large standing monuments to Lewis Watson, first earl of Rockingham at Rockingham church, Northamptonshire , 1724–5 and Sir Samuel Ongley at Old Warden church, Bedfordshire , 1727–8. After 1725 Delvaux carved a group, Vertumnus and Pomona ( V&A

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G. S. Boulger

revised by Anne Pimlott Baker

Drope, Francis ( 1629 ? –1671 ), arboriculturist , was born at Cumnor vicarage, Berkshire , a younger son of the Revd Thomas Drope BD , vicar of Cumnor and rector of Ardley , near Bicester, Oxfordshire. He became a demy (or foundation scholar) of Magdalen College, Oxford , in 1645, and graduated as BA in 1647. In 1648 he was expelled by the parliamentary visitors, probably for having borne arms for the king, and he then became an assistant master in a private school kept by William Fuller at Twickenham. After the Restoration he received his MA (23 August

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Gordon Goodwin

revised by Alan Bell

Dunkin, John ( 1782–1846 ), topographer , the son of John Dunkin ( d. 1823) of Bicester, Oxfordshire , and his wife, Elizabeth , widow of John Telford and daughter of Thomas and Johanna Timms , was born at Bicester on 16 May 1782. While attending the local free school under James Jones , he suffered a severe accident and for many years it was feared he would remain disabled for life. While recovering he tried his hand at verse but contrived also to pick up some knowledge of history and archaeology. At the age of twenty he was apprenticed to a carpenter

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to have been some rivalry with that of Swithun. Pershore Abbey subsequently claimed that it had purchased some of Eadburh's relics from an abbess of Nunnaminster in the late tenth or the eleventh century. But it is possible that the St Eadburh culted at Pershore and at Bicester Priory , which also claimed to possess relics of her, may in fact have been an earlier Mercian saint, or saints, of the same name, who by the twelfth century had become confused with the better-known Eadburh of Nunnaminster.

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1856, the sixth child and third son of John Wilson Farnell and his wife, Harriot Pritchard. His father was then established as a draper in Salisbury , but in 1858, involved in the ruin of a brother, had to move his family to London where he eventually became manager for a Bicester brewery. Farnell was educated at the City of London School under E. A. Abbott before entering Exeter College, Oxford , as an open classical scholar in 1874. At Exeter he owed much to the teaching of Ingram Bywater and H. F. Pelham and, after obtaining a first class in

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Her family doubtless originated at Felmersham, Bedfordshire , and its members retained the name of their home village when they migrated to nearby Oxfordshire. One William Felmersham was named as co-holder of the manor of Bloxham, Oxford , in 1421, and a John Felmersham of Bicester , close to Godstow Abbey , is recorded as having been owed £40 in 1456. It is not known when Felmersham became a nun in the Benedictine house at Godstow , but she is likely to have been there for several years, and may have been an office-holder before she became abbess, some

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Exeter College, Oxford , on 9 February 1733, graduating BA on 14 October 1736. He was elected to a Petrie fellowship in 1737, and proceeded MA on 22 June 1739 before being appointed subdean of his college the following year. He was appointed curate of St Swithin's, Merton , near Bicester , a benefice within the gift of Exeter College , on three occasions: 29 September 1738, 5 October 1743, and 27 December 1746. He held this office concurrently with his fellowship at Exeter. He never married. Fortescue commenced his modest literary career with An Epistle with

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-century divines. Retirement at Myrtle House, 12 Mill Street, Eynsham , near Oxford , in 1975 did not greatly change her way of working except that she had more time to give to her pleasure in gardens and foreign travel. She died, unmarried, on 4 June 1986 in a nursing home at Bicester, Oxfordshire , after many months of a distressing illness.

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survivor was believed to have made £100,000 in the last nineteen years of his life. Under his will, made on 15 August 1664 and proved on 12 January 1667, his eldest son and heir, Sir William Glynne, bt ( c.1638–1690) , was left the castle and manor of Hawarden and property at Bicester and elsewhere in Oxfordshire. The house and estate at Henley Park and property in Lincoln's Inn Fields was to come to his son John after his wife's death. Other properties in north Wales were bequeathed to his son Thomas. Clearly this was the will of a man who had prospered

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retained under Queen Anne. In 1690 he bought the manor of Kempton, Sunbury, Middlesex , where he built Batavia House in 1697. He obtained a grant of arms in 1711, and died, probably in Sunbury , in January 1718. In his will Grantham asked to be buried at Bicester , specifically in the middle aisle of Bicester parish church ' where I received my Christianity and where my mother and father lyeth buried … and near that place to set up a marble monument of no less value than 200 Guineas with my name and age on it ' ( will, TNA: PRO, PROB 11/574, fol. 62 v ). He was