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W. G. D. Fletcher

revised by H. C. G. Matthew

Maclagan , Selwyn's successor at Lichfield , until 1890, when he resigned his canonry, thenceforth living with his only son, the Revd Charles Thomas Abraham (later bishop of Derby ), first at Christ Church, Lichfield , until 1897, and afterwards at Bakewell, Derbyshire. He died on 4 February 1903 at Bakewell vicarage , and was buried at Over Haddon churchyard. A memorial was placed in Eton College chapel.

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business, young Richard established himself with the purchase of his father's mill at Rocester, Staffordshire , in January 1783 and, six months later, that at Bakewell, Derbyshire. At his father's death in 1792 various sales, purchases, and partnership agreements over other cotton-spinning mills had left him with ownership of mills at Cromford and Masson in Derbyshire and part shares in those at Bakewell and Rocester. Arkwright displayed considerable talent for business in managing the wealth inherited from his father, and in his concern for the health of

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opened at Cromford in 1776, and in 1777 Arkwright , Need , and Strutt , in partnership with Thomas Walshman , a Lancashire attorney, and Thomas Cross , commenced construction of the ill-fated mill at Birkacre , near Chorley. Between 1777 and 1780 mills were commenced at Bakewell , Wirksworth , Alport (unsuccessfully), Litton , Rocester in Staffordshire , and Manchester , where Arkwright failed in an attempt to obtain rotary power from a Newcomen engine. The factory communities at Belper and Milford were begun in 1776–7. When the partnership

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the eldest son of William Bagshawe ( d. 1669) , yeoman of Litton , and his first wife, Jane , daughter of Raphe Oldfield of Litton. Educated at a number of local schools, his religious development was greatly influenced by two local clergyman, John Rowlandson , vicar of Bakewell , and Immanuel Bourne , vicar of Ashover. By the age of fifteen Bagshawe believed that he had a call to the ministry. Although his father, who eventually became a wealthy landowner in the Peak and took the title of gentleman, had communicated his own puritan beliefs to his

Article

Arthur H. Grant

revised by H. C. G. Matthew

Frederic Barker ( 1808–1882 ) by John Hubert Newman , 1870s ? by permission of the National Library of Australia PIC/5476 Barker, Frederic ( 1808–1882 ), Anglican bishop of Sydney , born at Baslow by Bakewell, Derbyshire , on 17 March 1808, was the grandson of William Barker , dean of Raphoe from 1757 to 1776, and the fifth son of the Revd John Barker (1762–1824) , vicar of Baslow. He was educated at Grantham School and at Jesus College, Cambridge , where he took his BA degree in 1831 and proceeded MA in 1839. At Cambridge he was much influenced by

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Arthur H. Grant

revised by Lynn Milne

Barker, John ( 1771–1849 ), diplomatist and horticulturist , was born at Smyrna on 9 March 1771. His father, William Barker , of The Hall, Bakewell, Derbyshire , was on his way from Florida to India , when ill health caused him to settle at Smyrna. John Barker was educated in England , and at the age of eighteen joined the banking house of Peter Thellusson , in Philpot Lane, London , where he became confidential clerk and cashier. About 1797 he went to the Porte as private secretary to John Spencer Smith , British ambassador there. On 9 April 1799

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Baukwell [Bankwell] , Roger ( d. in or after 1350 ), justice , derived his name from Bakewell in Derbyshire , where he appears to have held property. His parentage is unknown. He is first recorded in Michaelmas term 1314, acting as an attorney in the court of common pleas. During the 1320s he became a pleader in that court, and was created a serjeant at Michaelmas 1329, serving in that capacity at the Northamptonshire eyre of 1329–30. No sooner had he begun to receive commissions of oyer and terminer, and to take assizes, than on 27 February 1331 he was

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problems of control and conformity, and did so within a framework of fatherly discipline. While his efforts were scarcely a resounding success, they were certainly vigorous. His task was made the more difficult because several of the most populous communities—for example, Lichfield , Bakewell , Eccleshall , Shrewsbury , and Wolverhampton —were outside his jurisdiction and consequently remained strongholds of Roman Catholicism. Bentham concerned himself in particular with the affairs of Staffordshire and Shropshire. Clergymen who neglected their cures or who clung

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baptized on 30 September at All Saints' Church, Derby. According to C. L. Eastlake , he was apprenticed to an engraver, but an acquaintance stated that ' He was brought up to no profession except that of an Artist ' ( Hunter , BL, Add. MS 36527, fol. 36 v ). As a youth he lived at Bakewell, Derbyshire , with his father and his second wife and subsequently at Stamford with his father, whom he assisted by drawing architectural illustrations for his History of Rutland (1811). ' In point of accuracy ', his youthful sketches of church monuments, carefully outlined and

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living at Benwick Hall , near Hertford , and collected historical notes which formed the nucleus of Robert Clutterbuck's history of the county, eventually published between 1815 and 1827. He then moved successively to Mansfield Woodhouse in Nottinghamshire; Burr House , near Bakewell, Derbyshire; Manton in Rutland; and Stamford in Lincolnshire. The pattern of ambitious plans partially realized, first seen in Derbyshire , was repeated in Rutland , for which only the second part of the first volume of Blore's projected History and Antiquities of the

Article

Robert L. Patten and Patrick Leary

Bradbury, William ( 1800–1869 ), printer , was born in Bakewell, Derbyshire. As a young man he lived for a time in Lincoln , where he may have worked as an apprentice compositor under Captain Felix Joyce , whom he later employed in his own establishment. Bradbury moved to London in 1824 and began a printing business at 76 Fleet Street in partnership with his brother-in-law William Dent. In 1826 Bradbury married a woman named Sarah; two of his sons, Henry Riley Bradbury (1831–1860) and William Hardwick Bradbury (1832–1892) , followed him into the

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Bretnor, Thomas ( 1570/71–1618 ), astrologer and medical practitioner , was born in Bakewell, Derbyshire , and went to London about 1604, settling in the parish of St Sepulchre. Though he appears not to have attended university, he was fluent in Latin, French, and Spanish, and became a well-known figure in Jacobean London. Bretnor published a series of almanacs for the years 1607 to 1619, in which he advertised as a teacher of arithmetic, geometry, and astronomy, and practitioner of physick. He vigorously defended the truth of astrology against critics such

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Helens Street , and was buried at All Saints' Church on 26 August; his wife had predeceased him. Richard [iii] Brown continued to improve the working of marble. He too served as parish clerk at All Saints until his resignation in 1795. He married Mary Cooper of Buxton at Bakewell on 12 December 1798; she died in September 1802 and on 27 May 1806 he married Sarah Eley of St Alkmund's, Derby , with whom he had a daughter. Grand Duke Nicholas Pavlovich of Russia visited the works in 1816, followed in 1818 by his brother Michael. In 1820 work started

Article

Henry Broadbent

revised by M. C. Curthoys

Cornish, Francis Warre Warre- ( 1839–1916 ), schoolmaster and author , the second son of the Revd Hubert Kestell Cornish (1803–1873) , vicar of Bakewell and formerly fellow of Exeter College, Oxford , and his wife, Louisa , daughter of the Revd Francis Warre (1775–1854), DCL , was born at Cheddon Fitzpaine, Somerset , on 8 May 1839. His cousin Charles John Cornish was the father of Charles John Cornish and of Vaughan Cornish. He adopted the surname Warre-Cornish in 1892. He went to Eton College as a colleger, was Newcastle scholar in 1857, and passed

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Denman, Thomas ( 1733–1815 ), man-midwife , was born at Bakewell, Derbyshire , on 27 June 1733, the second son and third child of John Denman , apothecary, and his wife, Elizabeth. After early education at the free school in Bakewell , Denman became assistant to his elder brother, who had succeeded to their father's business. In 1753 Denman went to London and began to study medicine at St George's Hospital , but within six months his savings had run out. He then decided to apply for the post of surgeon's mate in the navy. During the next nine years Denman

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Gareth H. Jones and Vivienne Jones

the Reform Bill , the majority of tory peers having accepted Wellington's advice to give up the struggle. It was not until early September 1832 that the parliamentary session ended and Denman was able to escape to the grange (or small manor house) at Stoney Middleton , near Bakewell, Derbyshire , which he had lovingly improved over the years. Some thought it unprepossessing; Wensleydale said that Denman ' must be very fond of ancestral property to like such a house ' ( Arnould , 1.384 n. ). Denman was very tired. The Reform Bill debates had been prolonged

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G. C. Boase

revised by H. C. G. Matthew

children, all in difficult births, and sexual abstinence led to frequent separation between the parents. From 1811 the marriage was in difficulties. Moreover, in April 1816 Tennyson began a long-standing liaison with Mary (Polly) Thornhill , daughter of the squire of Stanton near Bakewell. The eight children were given nicknames by their father ( ‘the Stone’ , ‘the Sot’ , and so on, except for Eustace , Tennyson's favourite, who was expelled from Sandhurst in 1833). Tennyson made a promising start to his career as a barrister and entered parliament in 1818

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his final move against the north. Before midsummer of 920 he had ordered a second fortress built at Nottingham , and he went from there into the Peak District , where he had a fort built at Bakewell. It is uncertain whether this was followed by any combat between the English and the Norse: the chronicle simply reports that after the building of the fortress at Bakewell , the king of the Scots , and Ragnall , and all of those who lived in Northumbria , English and Danish and Norse, and also the Welsh of Strathclyde , chose Edward as their ' father and lord

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and four daughters. Apart from the stop valve income, he exploited his reputation to act as a consultant to some of the large electricity-supply companies being formed at that time, and by 1913 this improved financial strength had provided the resources for him to buy Baslow Hall, Bakewell , in Derbyshire. It was also during this time that he became involved in industrial politics, helping to establish the British Electrical and Allied Manufacturers' Association , a powerful electrical cartel of which he was president in 1912. He was also the first person to take

Article

Gordon Goodwin

revised by Jan Broadway

time he was appointed autumn reader in 1628. He subsequently became the Gray's Inn treasurer in November 1637. Outside the legal terms he lived at Middleton. His strict impartiality as a magistrate is commemorated by the Apostle of the Peak, William Bagshaw. In 1640, at the Bakewell sessions, the curate of Taddington was charged with puritanism. Fulwood , who was chairman, ' though known to be a zealot in the cause of the then king and conformity, released him, and gave his accusers a sharp reprimand ' ( W. Bagshaw , De spiritualibus pecci , 1702, 17 ).