1-20 of 39 Results

  • Place Mentioned: Accrington x
Clear all

Article

and completed by March 1860. They were described as worthy to ' bear comparison with the most extensive aqueducts in the world, not excluding those of ancient Rome ' ( Gale ). Bateman carried out extensive water supply works in the UK. These include the systems for Aberdâr , Accrington , Ashton , Belfast , Birkenhead , Blackburn , Bolton , Cheltenham , Chester , Chorley , Colne and Marsden , Colne valley , Darwen , Dewsbury , Dublin , Forfar , Gloucester , Halifax , Kendal , Macclesfield , Newcastle upon Tyne , Oldham , Perth , Stockport

Article

Cooper Street, Manchester , on 24 February 1827. She was the eldest of fifteen children. Her grandfather, Ernest Hannibal Becker , was a German, naturalized in England , who settled in business in Manchester. Her father joined the family-owned chemical works at Altham , near Accrington, Lancashire , moved with Mary and the children to Reddish, Stockport , where he began a calico-printing firm, and returned to Altham in 1850. Except for a short stay at a boarding-school in Everton, Liverpool , and a visit to relatives in Germany in 1844–5, Lydia lived

Article

at Accrington on 15 May 1879 , Mary Fecitt ( 1848–1899 ), a power-loom cotton weaver and heald knitter, daughter of James Fecitt , a grocer, and his wife, Margaret Margerison. Following her death, he married for a third time, at Uttoxeter on 13 December 1900 , Annie Eliza Burgess ( 1860–1924 ), daughter of Isaac Burgess , a farmer, and his wife, Edith Riley. Birtwistle retired as an inspector on reaching his seventieth birthday in 1903, and died at his home, 17 St James's Street, Accrington , on 22 March 1912; he was buried in Accrington cemetery

Article

Fred Brown ( 1925–2004 ) by Godfrey Argent Studio , 1981 Godfrey Argent Studios Brown, Fred ( 1925–2004 ), virologist , was born on 31 January 1925 at 80 Blackburn Road, Clayton-le-Moors , near Accrington, Lancashire , the younger son of Fred Brown (father and son were named Fred not Frederick ), a French polisher and a veteran of the Somme , and his wife, Jane Ellen, née Fielding. His brother Roland , who became a chartered accountant and company chairman, was two years older. The family moved to Burnley in the 1930s and Brown won a scholarship

Article

businessman from North Tawton, Devon , and his wife, Marian (daughter of Oliver Vaughan Pugh ), from Llanfyllin, Montgomeryshire , to which she returned with her children in 1889 on the death of her husband. Bulleid was educated at Spa College, Bridge of Allan, Scotland , and at Accrington Technical School. In 1901 he began a four-year premium apprenticeship for the Great Northern Railway at their Doncaster works, under Henry Alfred Ivatt , locomotive carriage and wagon superintendent, with academic studies at Sheffield and Leeds universities. In 1908 Bulleid

Article

employees, James Whittaker and John Walmsley , Bullough perfected a machine that sized two warps and wound them on two beams at the same time. Bullough managed and ran a number of small mills in Lancashire before joining John Howard in a textile machinery business at Accrington in 1856. Howard had begun three years earlier with four employees but with Bullough's backing expansion accelerated. The firm of Howard and Bullough specialized in machines for preparing and spinning cotton, and by 1866, the year of Howard's death, employed 300 workpeople

Article

established close links with a clientele of wealthy investors, including a fellow Primitive Methodist, the jam manufacturer W. P. Hartley (1846–1922) in Aintree , and Hartley's son-in-law, the Congregationalist J. S. Higham (1857–1932) , a cotton spinner and manufacturer in Accrington , who served with him as co-directors. From 1911 onwards Bunting perfected the financial management of his group; he no longer published balance sheets and used a very high ratio of loan to ordinary (or equity) capital in order to maximize the dividend paid on the ordinary shares

Article

significant event in history since the beginning of Christianity. He was a delegate to the League of Nations assembly in 1924 and 1930, and promoted the international language Esperanto, serving as president of the British Esperantists. Buxton was defeated when he contested Accrington for the Labour Party in 1918, but won the seat in 1922, only to lose it in the following year. He returned to the Commons as the MP for Elland in 1929, but was unsuccessful in the general elections of 1931 and 1935. He was not a natural election campaigner, being described

Article

apparently unknown family; they had eight sons and a daughter. Despite the fact that he was a member of an influential Manx family he appears to have spent at least part of his early career in Lancashire , where in 1633 he purchased lands, including coalpits, at Sparth , near Accrington , for the sum of £900. In 1643 his father assigned to him the recently purchased estate of Ronaldsway in the parish of Malew on the island, only a short distance from the principal Derby stronghold of Castle Rushen. He was probably the William Christian who was one of

Article

1907–1969 ) by Walter Stoneman , 1940 © National Portrait Gallery , London Davenport, Harold ( 1907–1969 ), mathematician , was born on 30 October 1907 in Huncoat , near Accrington, Lancashire , the elder child and only son of Percy Davenport , a clerk, and, later, the company secretary, at Perseverance Mill , and his wife, Nancy , daughter of John Barnes , the owner of the mill. From Accrington grammar school Davenport won scholarships to Manchester University where, in 1927 at the age of nineteen, he graduated with first-class honours in mathematics. In

Article

Drake, Sir James ( 1907–1989 ), civil engineer , was born on 27 July 1907 at 69 Prospect Terrace, Whalley Road, Altham, Burnley , the son of James Drake , a commercial clerk, and his wife, Ellen Hague. He was educated at Accrington grammar school (1918–1924) and at the Victoria University of Manchester (1924–7), where he graduated BSc in civil engineering, with first-class honours. He passed the professional exams of the Institution of Civil Engineers in April 1931, and was accepted as an associate in 1933 and as a full member in 1943. He married Kathleen

Article

Duckworth, (David) Keith ( 1933–2005 ), automotive engineer , was born at 112 Accrington Road, Blackburn, Lancashire , on 10 August 1933, the son of Frank Duckworth , a textile engineer who also sold cotton cloth on the Manchester cotton exchange , and his wife, Emma, née Hardman , a cooker demonstrator in electricity board showrooms. Following his education at Giggleswick , a boarding school in Yorkshire , Duckworth joined the Royal Air Force as a national serviceman. He undertook pilot training, moving from Tiger Moths to Chipmunks and then to twin-engine

Article

C. W. Sutton

revised by Geoffrey Taylor

Henry Dunckley ( 1823–1896 ) by Alfred Edward Emslie , 1889 © Manchester City Art Galleries Dunckley, Henry ( 1823–1896 ), journalist , was born in Warwick on 24 December 1823, the son of James Dunckley. Intending to become a minister, he went to the Baptist college at Accrington, Lancashire , and then, in 1846, with financial assistance from the Dr Ward Trust , to the University of Glasgow , where he graduated BA in 1847 and MA in 1848. In 1848 he became minister of the Baptist church at Great George Street, Salford , and on 7 October of the same year

Article

1918–22, when he lost his Neath seat to the Labour candidate, William Jenkins. Edwards returned to parliament in 1923, representing the Accrington division of Lancashire , where the Conservatives stood aside as part of a local anti-socialist agreement. He retained the seat as a Constitutionalist in 1924, but returned to the Liberal fold. His parliamentary career came to an end in May 1929, when he was defeated at Accrington by Thomas Snowden , the Labour candidate. From 1905 Edwards lived in England , at first in south London until 1920, when he moved to

Article

the nursery was associated with hardy geraniums, another of Margery Fish's great loves and a species she brought to the public's attention as one of the best, trouble-free perennials. Her husband, Walter George Fish ( 1874–1947 ), journalist , was born at 69 Whalley Road, Accrington, Lancashire , on 3 June 1874, the son of George Fish , a newspaper reporter, and his wife, Margaret Anne, née Pierce. He was educated at Westminster City School. Following in his father's footsteps, he entered journalism, given as his occupation at the time of his marriage

Article

Higginbottom, Frederick James ( 1859–1943 ), journalist , was born on 21 October 1859 at Accrington, Lancashire , the son of Matthew Fielding Higginbottom , a mathematics tutor, and his wife, Margaret, née Sykes. After a private education in Liverpool , Higginbottom began his career in journalism with the Southport Daily News , at the age of fifteen. He had learned enough by 1879 to take up the editorship of the Southport Visiter , described in his memoirs as a ' social paper ' but offering scope to develop his skills as a political reporter. By 1881

Article

worked assiduously in this forum until his defeat in 1922. Beyond his Burnley base, he was a significant figure in the SDF , sitting on its executive from 1897, propagandizing, and fighting elections. In the 1906 election he secured a creditable vote against the sitting Liberal at Accrington; in both 1910 campaigns he contested Rochdale , a town with some record of socialist strength. A more specially propagandist intervention came in the North West Manchester by-election of April 1908. All these candidacies were on a specifically Social Democrat platform independent

Article

(1800), and Progressive Lessons Sketched from Nature (1804). He died from ' decay of nature ' at 2 Upper Coleshill Street, Pimlico , on 8 July 1839. Examples of his work are in the British Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London , and the art galleries at Aberdeen , Accrington , Leeds , Leicester , and Newport. Laporte's daughter Mary Anne ( b. c.1795) painted portraits and fancy subjects. She exhibited at the Royal Academy and the British Institution from 1813 to 1821, and was a member of the New Society of Painters in Water Colours from

Article

Hargreaves, second baronet ( 1868–1937 ), lawyer , was born at Send Holme, Send , near Guildford, Surrey , on 24 August 1868, the eldest son of Sir Joseph Francis Leese, first baronet (1845–1914) , cotton spinner and later recorder of Manchester (1893–1914) and MP for Accrington (1892–1910), and his wife, Mary Constance Hargreaves ( d. 1928). He was educated at Winchester College and at Trinity College, Cambridge (1887–90), where he developed a keen interest in cricket and acting, which he retained for the rest of his life. His own desire was for

Article

Gordon Goodwin

revised by Ian Sellers

raised money for his studies at Airedale Independent college by undertaking lecture tours of south Wales. He graduated BA of London University in 1852 and served the Congregational churches at Barton upon Humber (1853–8); Rothwell, Northamptonshire (1858–63); Oak Street, Accrington (1863–6); Grimshaw Street, Preston (1866–8); and Offord Street, Islington (1868–9). Lewis was an effective preacher, and his educational and temperance work was complemented by his literary and scientific lectures for young men. He wrote, among other short works, The Wines