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away from the rest of the royal family and they were brought up quietly at home. In August 1910 Alexandra's meddlesome spinster aunt Princess Victoria arranged for her first cousin, the myopic Prince Christopher of Greece , to be invited to Mar Lodge , the Fifes' estate near Braemar. Princess Victoria assured the duke of Fife that Christopher would not propose, but neglected to inform the hopeful suitor. During the visit the young couple became secretly betrothed, though the duke of Fife soon forbade the union. Prince Christopher concluded that they

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catastrophe is the subject of the humorous Scottish ballad 'The Haughs o' Cromdale'. Buchan's responsibility for it permanently alienated the clans, and the highland army never reassembled. In August 1690 Buchan advanced eastwards through Aberdeenshire with some cavalry and 600 Braemar highlanders , and bluffed the local commander, the master of Forbes , into fleeing to Aberdeen. The Aberdeenshire and Kincardineshire lowland episcopalian gentry briefly rose and joined Buchan , swelling his force to perhaps 1800. But it lacked a solid core of highland foot

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specialized in the history of Regency furniture. She was vigorous and gregarious, and brought to their household a lively social circle, in which Compton-Burnett was mostly content to play second fiddle and pour tea. Neither woman married, and in 1934 they moved to a flat in 5 Braemar Mansions, Cornwall Gardens, Kensington, London , which remained Compton-Burnett's home until her death. Whether they enjoyed a lesbian partnership is disputed. ' We are neutrals ', was how Compton-Burnett described herself and Margaret to one friend, and the biographer Hilary

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Thompson Cooper

revised by Clotilde Prunier

Cameron, Alexander ( 1747–1828 ) Cameron, Alexander ( 1747–1828 ), vicar apostolic of the lowland district , was born at Auchindryne, Braemar, Aberdeenshire , on 28 July 1747, the son of James Cameron and Marjory Mackintosh. He first studied at the Lowland seminary at Scalan , in Glenlivet , then entered the Scots College, Rome , on 22 December 1764. On his return to Scotland in 1772 he was appointed to the mission of Strathaven. On 23 January 1781 he became rector of the Scots College, Valladolid. He remained in Spain until 1802, though he was

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Ross's Collection (1869), edited by William Ross , Angus MacKay's successor as piper to Queen Victoria , which contained the earliest published versions of many of the classic tunes. Although he lived in relative seclusion as piper to the duke of Fife at Mar Lodge , near Braemar , and competed seldom (prize pipe, Inverness , 1861; gold medal, Inverness , 1865), Colin Cameron dominated the world of late Victorian piping. He made important contributions to David Glen's Ancient Piobaireachd (1880–1907) and C. S. Thomason's Ceol Mor (1900), and was

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Cameron, William [ nicknamed Hawkie] ( c. 1787–1851 ) Cameron, William [ nicknamed Hawkie] ( c. 1787–1851 ), pedlar and beggar , was probably born at St Ninians, Stirlingshire , the son of Dugald Cameron of Braemar , a mashman, and his wife, Janet Paterson. As members of the Burgher Secession church the family barely feature in parochial registers, so details of Cameron's early life are mostly drawn from his autobiography. He was crippled at the age of six, and his parents destined him for a sedentary career as a tailor. He liked neither the work

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n Oxford burdensome. He began to seek alternatives to his Oriel tutorship, even though Matthew Arnold had joined him as a fellow in spring 1845. During his years as a tutor he was a conscientious teacher, and in the summer vacations he took reading parties of his pupils to Braemar and Loch Ness in Scotland. In the years following 1845 Clough's attention turned to political matters. He wrote a number of letters in 1846 on political economy, which were published in a journal called The Balance. In the same year he made his first continental tour, visiting

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he was appointed to the command of the Royal North British Dragoons (the Scots Greys) , which he retained until February 1717. However, disenchantment with the accession of George I led Portmore to dabble in Jacobite politics. Before the earl of Mar raised his standard at Braemar in September 1715 Bolingbroke attempted unsuccessfully to bring Portmore over to the Jacobite side. Further efforts were made by Mar during the rising to turn Portmore's regiment, the Scots Greys , but without success; the regiment, under the acting command of Lieutenant-Colonel

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spring of that year he joined the viscount of Kenmure (his brother-in-law) and the earl of Nithsdale at a race meeting at Lochmaben where they formed a Jacobite association. Though Carnwath appeared on a list of Jacobite leaders who attended the earl of Mar's famous hunt at Braemar (27 August 1715) preparatory to the raising of the Pretender's (James Stuart's) standard, most modern historians doubt his presence there. After wavering, Carnwath joined the rising. Though some attributed his decision to the influence of his mother and his sister, it is likely

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B. D. Jackson

revised by D. E. Allen

C. Watson's New Botanist's Guide (1832), and further work led to a slim Flora Aberdonensis (1838) and eventually to the rich store of information on which William Macgillivray was able to draw in 1855 for his pathmaking ecological essay, The Natural History of Deeside and Braemar. A fern found in a local cave was named Cystopteris dickieana in his honour; it was later found in several other parts of Scotland and widely in the Arctic , but its claims to be a separate species were disproved by allozyme study over a century and a half later. Dickie studied

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professional athlete Dinnie's records included throwing the heavy hammer 81 feet 6 inches , throwing the heavy stone 35 feet 5 inches , throwing the light stone 45 feet 7 inches , and clearing 5 feet 1 inch in the high jump. By 1868 he had also advanced the records at the Braemar Royal Highland Gathering to: 92 feet 4 inches for the 16 lb hammer, 84 feet 9 inches for the 22 lb hammer, and 5 feet 4 inches for the high jump. Promoters were prepared to pay him between £25 and £100 to appear at Scottish highland games events. In 1870 Dinnie was

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R. E. Graves

revised by Joanna Soden

colour. Most of his paintings were exhibited in Glasgow , but he was also a regular exhibitor at the Royal Scottish Academy between 1864 and 1878, and also at the Royal Academy in London between 1865 and 1877. Among the most popular were The Haunt of the Red Deer on the Dee, Braemar (exh. RA , 1869) and The Head of Loch Lomond (exh. RA , 1873). His last exhibited works were The Trossachs , in the Royal Scottish Academy show of 1878, and A Salmon Stream in the Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts exhibition in the same year. In 1876, owing to his failing

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to Brigadier John Hay of Cromlix (later ennobled as the Jacobite earl of Inverness ), Lord Mar's brother-in-law. Edgar proudly reminded correspondents he was ' amongst the first ' ( Tayler and Tayler , 1715 , 39 ) to join Mar when the Jacobite standard was raised at Braemar. Widely reputed for his integrity and amiable nature, Edgar escaped Scotland after the rising's collapse by supposedly evading capture in borrowed farmer's clothes, which he later took pains to return to their rightful owner. Edgar was counted among other Jacobite refugees at

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provide some excellent highland estates for hunting— Mar's ' chief delight ' ( Scot , 59 ), in which he seems to have spent most summers. John Taylor, the Water Poet of London , was a guest at one of his hunts in Braemar in 1618 and left a detailed account of it ( Hume Brown , 120–23 ). In 1628, two years after recovering Kildrummy , Mar built Braemar Castle , partly as a base for hunting and partly perhaps as a defence against possible highland raids. Mar died in Stirling on 14 December 1634: ' walking in his own hall, a dog cast him off his feet and lamed

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short ride took him to the estate of the earl of Kinnoull , his former father-in-law, where the small party of eighteen horse was joined by the family's son John Hay. The Erskines' estate at Braemar saw the first council of war, thinly disguised as a hunting party, or tindal , on 27 August. On 6 September the standard of ' James the 8th and 3rd ' was raised at Braemar among 600 followers. The lack of a proper commission from the Stuart court did not prevent Mar from excelling at the things he did best: sending out orders, canvassing, and gathering supplies

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banned in France in 1764 he accompanied the community to Dinant in the Southern Netherlands and he was minister in the college in 1766–9; after the suppression of the order in 1773, he returned to Scotland and settled with his nephew in Braemar , where he died on 22 August 1782. He was buried in Castleton kirkyard, Braemar. Information on Farquharson from oral tradition is anecdotal and imprecise and sometimes conflicts with the evidence. He is said to have built a chapel and house at Fasnakyle in Strathglass and at some point to have been captured by

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received his higher instruction in piping from Alexander Cameron the younger (1848–1923) , then piper to the marquess of Huntly at Aboyne Castle , and they remained close until Cameron's death in 1923. Gillies went on to win all the top piobaireachd awards, including the Braemar gold medal in 1875, the Inverness prize pipe in 1882, the Oban gold medal in 1884, and the gold medal for previous winners at Inverness in 1885. He was the first winner of the clasp for former gold medallists at Inverness in 1896. Contemporaries attested to his outstanding

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of Aberdeen by James Gordon Parson of Rothemay , Spalding Club (1842) C. G. Cash, ‘Manuscript maps by Pont, the Gordons, and Adair, in the Advocates' Library, Edinburgh’, Scottish Geographical Magazine , 23 (1907), 574–92 R. Spence, ‘The map-making Gordons’, Scottish Annual & Braemar Gathering Book (1958), 157–65 W. Cowan, The maps of Edinburgh, 1544–1929 , 2nd edn (1932) J. Blaeu, Theatrum orbis terrarum, sive, Atlas novus , pt 5 (1654)

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Publick and Political Business ', he was ' utterly a Stranger to all Military Affairs ', and his ' singular Good Temper ' and plain, quiet demeanour were unsuited to the task in hand ( Patten , 1.51 ). In mid-August Kenmure and Carnwath were listed among those who attended Mar's Braemar hunting, but they were almost certainly not present. Kenmure's young wife gave him strong support, embroidering the fine standard he raised, but contrary to misogynistic traditional stories, did not force him into rebellion. Following Mar's initiation of the highland rebellion

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Gregory, Roderic Alfred ( 1913–1990 ) Gregory, Roderic Alfred ( 1913–1990 ), physiologist , was born on 29 December 1913 at 63 Braemar Road, Plaistow, London , the only child of Alfred Gregory (1884–1938) , motor mechanic, and his wife, Alice Jane, née Greaves (1889–1978). He was educated at George Green's School, London , and from there he went to University College, London (UCL) , to read physiology (1931–4). He graduated with first-class honours and was then Bayliss and Starling memorial scholar (1935) and Sharpey scholar (1936–9) at UCL; he was awarded