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Allestree, Richard ( 1621/2–1681 ) Richard Allestree ( 1621/22–1681 ) by David Loggan , pubd 1684 © National Portrait Gallery , London Allestree, Richard ( 1621/2–1681 ), Church of England clergyman , was born at Uppington , near the Wrekin, Shropshire. His father, Richard Allestree , was steward to Sir Richard (afterwards Lord) Newport. According to the hagiographic biography of Allestree by his friend Bishop John Fell , the Allestree family was of ancient stock and had formerly been prosperous: Anthony Wood associates them with the Allestree

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) Andrews, Henry Stewart Fleetwood [Harry] ( 1910–1989 ), actor , was born on 10 November 1910 at St Mary's, Pembury Road, Tonbridge, Kent , the son of Scottish doctor Henry Arthur Andrews and his wife, Amy Diana Frances Horner. He was educated at Tonbridge School and at Wrekin College, Shropshire. His father was a keen amateur actor, but Andrews considered careers as a professional cricketer and a policeman before he joined Liverpool Playhouse; he made his début there as John in The Long Christmas Dinner (1933), and in London , at the St James's

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as John Brougham , James Henry Hackett , Samuel Phelps , Tyrone Power , and Madame Vestris. For almost half a century, Bayle Bernard was, as his father had been, a fixture of literary, theatrical, and bohemian life in London , frequenting, in the late 1830s and 1840s, the Wrekin tavern near Drury Lane , ' time out of mind the favourite resort of authors, actors, poets, painters, and penny-a-liners ' ( Life and Reminiscences , 1.62 ). He was a member of the Dramatic Authors' Society and theatre critic for the Weekly Dispatch. In 1830 Bernard made a

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Labour MP in the Labour landslide of 1945 was a crowning moment and his association with Aneurin Bevan his greatest achievement. In the general election of 1950 Bruce lost his redrawn Portsmouth West constituency by 945 votes. When he tried again for a parliamentary seat in the Wrekin in the general elections of 1959 and 1964, he failed each time. By then he had already set up his own accountancy firm, which he personally ran until 1974 when it merged with Halpern and Woolf , with Bruce remaining a senior partner. Halpern and Woolf were later taken over by

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C. James Stubblefield

revised by R. B. Rickards

1923 he took a first-class BSc in geology, with zoology as the subsidiary subject, and also the ARCS. Awarded a Beit scientific research fellowship, Bulman proceeded to a London PhD degree jointly with C. James Stubblefield with a thesis entitled 'The Shineton Shales of the Wrekin district, Shropshire' (1926). He spent the first year of an 1851 senior studentship (1925–6) at Imperial College where his fellow research students included Walter Frederick Whittard with whom he wrote a paper on Permian branchiosaurid amphibia. For the remaining two years of

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Chronicle does not mention any further viking attacks on Mercia until 867–8, but it cannot be assumed that the kingdom was unthreatened during the interval. A chance reference in a charter of Burgred reveals an otherwise unknown incursion of the heathens into the territory of the ' Wrekin -dwellers ' in what is now Shropshire in 855. All but one of Burgred's surviving charters belong to the period between 855 and 866; he followed the example of his predecessor Berhtwulf in occasionally granting privileges and exemption to various Mercian churches in return for

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studied particularly the rocks of the Wrekin area near Wellington. By 1873 he had discovered fossils near Shineton; they were apparently Upper Cambrian, but the government survey had mapped the rocks in which they occurred as Caradoc Sandstone (Silurian). (The Shineton Shales were later regarded as Ordovician, but this system was not proposed until 1879.) If the Shales were Upper Cambrian, the underlying Wrekin Quartzite was plausibly Lower Cambrian, and since this unit lapped round the volcanic ashes of the Wrekin , the hill was arguably Precambrian (Archaean)

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Anthony Nutting , minister of state, who had negotiated the final stages of the Anglo-Egyptian agreement of 1954, later resigned. By this stage rumours of collusion were already circulating in the House of Commons , and when the session resumed the Conservative back-bench MP for the Wrekin , William Yates , asked directly about whether Britain had been engaged in an ' international conspiracy ' ( Hansard 5C , vol. 558, p. 1716 ). Evasiveness over collusion was one of the persistent charges levelled at Eden in the years ahead, especially as his last statement in

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further period of insecurity he was dispatched to a Jewish boarding-school, Beaconsfield School in Frant, Sussex. He spent two undistinguished and disconsolate years there, followed by a brief period at Clayesmore , near Taunton , and then Wrekin College (where his younger brother, Clive , excelled). He left Wrekin in the summer of 1950 to begin work in the prospering family business. At the age of eighteen Epstein was conscripted for national service. Having been rejected by the RAF , he began a two-year stint in the Royal Army Service Corps at Aldershot

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Shropshire. Eyton died at the family seat, Eyton Hall, Wellington, Shropshire , on 25 October 1880. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Thomas Slaney Eyton (1843–1899). A daughter, Charlotte Eyton , was author of several works on scientific subjects, including The Rocks of the Wrekin (1862) and By Fell and Flood (1872). Clemency Thorne Fisher Sources DNB Shropshire County Council, Eyton MSS The Ibis , 9th ser., 2 (1908), 79 The Ibis , 4th ser., 5 (1881), 178 letters from and to other naturalists, NHM letters from and to other naturalists, American Philosophical

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of excavation from two very experienced archaeologists: Gerhard Bersu , former director of the German Archaeological Institute (expelled by the Nazis in 1935 ), at the Iron Age settlement at Little Woodbury in 1938; and Kathleen Kenyon , at the Iron Age hillfort at the Wrekin in 1939. He also excavated locally, at an Iron Age site at Carshalton, Surrey , and, in his home county, a Romano-British village at Needham, Norfolk. Following the outbreak of the Second World War, he joined the National Fire Service in London ( 1940–4 ) but continued to

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leaders. In 1934 Garratt and Thompson published The Rise and Fulfilment of British Rule in India , which came to be regarded as the first British attempt to understand the Indian nationalist movement on its own terms. In the general election of 1935 he unsuccessfully stood for Wrekin, Shropshire. Meanwhile, preparing a biography of Lord Brougham , published in 1935 and followed in 1936 by another historical study, The Two Mr Gladstones , he contemplated an academic career, but developments in international relations drew him back into journalism and politics

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such as felt and celluloid. Buttressed by profits made during these years, expansion continued after the war. In 1919 the Harborne Village Institute was acquired as a printing works for box covers, and the following year the production of teddy bears was moved to a new factory, the Wrekin Toy Works in Wellington, Shropshire. With its output of wooden toys, jigsaws, board games, teddy bears, fabric dolls, cowboy outfits, and clockwork trains, the Chad Valley Company bestrode the market. It remained a private company, though Johnson chose as his fellow directors

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Quaker—not a thin, withered, crotchety disciple of George Fox , but a full-fed Quaker, fair and ruddy, with eyes of blue that gave back the bright azure of the sky and lightened up a fine and manly face ' ( Randall , 293 ). Reynolds enjoyed rural scenery, and organized picnics on the Wrekin and Benthall Edge for his senior workers and their families. During the 1780s he laid out on Lincoln Hill on the eastern side of Coalbrookdale a network of ‘sabbath walks’ for the recreational use of his workers. Having a Quakerly concern for good works, he provided generously

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established Institute of Archaeology. At Oxford he had taken part in Mortimer Wheeler's excavations of the Maiden Castle hill fort in Dorset and then of hill forts in Brittany , and from London took part in Kathleen Kenyon's excavation of the hill fort at the summit of the Wrekin, Shropshire. These activities were cut short by the outbreak of war and his enlistment as a gunner in the Royal Artillery. After service in coastal defence he was transferred to the ciphers branch of signals, and in spring 1941 he was posted first to Abyssinia and then to Kenya

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time. There Nancy learned the fluent German, which was to stand her in good stead in both her war and archaeological work. Her initiation in archaeology also came through Betty , who introduced her to Kathleen Kenyon at Oxford , with whom she took part in an excavation at the Wrekin , an Iron Age hillfort in Shropshire , in 1939. When the Second World War broke out in September 1939 , she was about to join Mortimer Wheeler on an excavation in Normandy , but instead found herself helping Kenyon to pack up artefacts in the Institute of Archaeology in

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surrender of Kut than by his indifference to the fate of his men in captivity, and by his own vainglorious account of his campaign in Mesopotamia , published in 1920. He retired from the army and was elected to parliament in November 1920 as an independent Conservative, for The Wrekin, Shropshire. He spoke occasionally in the Commons on matters concerning the Middle East or ex-servicemen, but he was not a successful politician and did not seek re-election in October 1922. He sought to act as a mediator between Great Britain and Turkey in the final settlement

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Trevelyan facilitated developments in many disciplines. In retirement he came to be regarded as a prophet in the studies that are perhaps best summarized in the title of one of his courses, ‘The primal oneness in diversity’. He founded, and from 1971 to 1992 was director of, the Wrekin Trust , whose gatherings carried further the themes of his Attingham courses. He encouraged responsible attitudes to the planet, sought common elements within the great religions of the world, and found spiritual values in literature. Though smitten by arthritis, he travelled extensively

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having concluded that its programme was most in keeping with Christian ethics, Picton-Turbervill joined the Labour Party. Well known in reform-minded circles, she unsuccessfully contested North Islington in November 1922 and Stroud in October 1924, before being returned for The Wrekin in Shropshire in the general election of June 1929. One of only fourteen women MPs (nine of them Labour members) in the 1929–31 parliament , Picton-Turbervill's influence as a back-bencher was limited, but she successfully sponsored a private member's bill outlawing the pronunciation

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Maid's Tragedy , in which Huddart appeared as Evadne with Macready as Melantius. She also played Portia to Samuel Phelps's Shylock and Helen McGregor to his Rob Roy. On 6 July 1837, at St George's, Bloomsbury , she married Robert William Warner , formerly the landlord of The Wrekin tavern, Broad Court, Bow Street , a haunt of actors and journalists, who had become bankrupt four months earlier. Warner described his subsequent role as making engagements for his wife and escorting her to and from rehearsals and performances. In the autumn of 1837 Mrs Warner