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journalism and from freelance lecturing on temperance and in support of the new poor law. He worked briefly as the editor of the North Cheshire Reformer in 1837 and later established another short-lived radical paper, the Liverpool Politician (July 1838 ). A lecture by him in Huddersfield in November 1838 in support of the new poor law provoked a major disturbance. By 1839 he was working for the Anti-Corn Law League as an itinerant lecturer and over the next seven years he campaigned fearlessly for the league. In May 1842 he was dragged from the platform

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classes for women, and a working men's college; horticultural, floral, literary, and scientific societies; recreation club with bowling ground; clothing club, life annuity insurance scheme, mutual improvement society, and savings bank. Akroyd entered parliament as whig member for Huddersfield in 1857 after a famous victory over Richard Cobden , whose censure motion had precipitated the fall of Palmerston's government. Although he narrowly lost the seat in 1859, he was subsequently returned without a contest for Halifax in 1865, and re-elected in 1868, holding the

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each year was Alexander’s opulent summer party at his home at Crowhurst , near Battle, Sussex , where he created a magnificent garden. He died at Tunbridge Wells Hospital on 5 July 2015 , of a lung infection. Sources Daily Mail (8 July 2015) Daily Telegraph (13 Aug 2015) Huddersfield Daily Examiner (18 Aug 2015) private information (2019) personal knowledge (2019) b. cert. d. cert. Likenesses J. Londei , photograph, Rex Features two photographs, 1963, Associated Newspapers/Rex Features photograph, talking to housewives during his election campaign, 1963, Associated

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to take holy orders, and was disappointed when he turned his back on an academic course; but he was eager to enter journalism and at sixteen joined the staff of the Eastern Morning News in Hull. Even so, he never lost his love of the classics. From Hull , Andrews moved to Huddersfield and later to Sheffield , where he became a reporter on the Sheffield Telegraph. He contributed to other journals, including the Globe and the Echo , and by the time he was twenty he had saved enough to enable him to spend a year studying and working as a freelance in Paris

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J. A. Ratcliffe

revised by Roger Hutchins

) and to problems of radio-wave propagation caused by interference. It was as a second lieutenant in the Royal Engineers that he married, on 23 May 1915, Jessie Longson-Range (1890/91–1964) , a distant cousin, the daughter of the Baptist minister John Longson , sometime of Huddersfield , later of Canada; they had two daughters. Ionospheric research In 1919 Appleton returned to Cambridge as a fellow of St John's College and in 1920 he became an assistant demonstrator in physics at the Cavendish Laboratory. Rutherford supported his research with Balth

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Whitley Council for the soap industry. He became president of the Society of Chemical Industry for 1922–4, and of the British Association of Chemists for 1924–5. In 1925 Armstrong became managing director of the British Dyestuffs Corporation (BDC) at Manchester and Huddersfield , where he was widely welcomed for introducing scientific eminence on to a board notorious for antipathy to British chemical research. He was soon plunged into convoluted negotiations on the future of the British dyestuffs industry, then under severe pressure from German competition

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created by Ashton's subtle tactical play, while Ashton himself could be confident that the burly yet light-footed Boston would take advantage of even the slightest try-scoring opportunity presented to him. Ashton was a ‘classical’ rugby centre-threequarter in the tradition of Huddersfield's Harold Wagstaff and Bradford's Ernest Ward : a player who saw his role as creating space for his winger to score tries. He was a master of delaying the pass to his winger until the very last fraction of a second, thus drawing in his opposing centre-threequarter and causing

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name Henry seems to have been added at an early stage. He was the second son of the two sons and three daughters of Joseph Dixon Asquith (1825?–1860) , a minor employer in the woollen trade, and his wife, Emily ( d. 1888) , daughter of William Willans JP , a wool-stapler of Huddersfield. Two of his sisters died early, and his brother suffered a sports injury which stunted his growth; his father died when he was eight, from an intestine twisted while playing cricket. His mother was an invalid, with a heart condition and frequent bronchitis. The young Herbert Asquith

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developed by Peter Atkinson's sons during their long and successful practice in York. The accumulated drawings of the Carr – Atkinson partnership were sold by public auction by Christies on 13 December 1988 and subsequently dispersed. They included a scheme for a bank at Huddersfield dated 1827, drawings of Gilling Castle of 1815, and projected alterations to Denton Park of 1826. Following the death of his first wife in 1825, Atkinson married Joanna (1797–1837) , a professional singer and a daughter of Thomas Goodall. Following a financial crisis in

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indication in any other review or in any official document. Had she not become a professional musician there would be nothing to distinguish her from any other member of the wealthy, privileged, upper-middle classes of Victorian England. Sources Era (1 March 1884); (24 May 1884) Huddersfield Chronicle (6 March 1886) Hackney and Kingsland Gazette (18 April 1883) Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter (21 April 1888) Daily Telegraph & Courier (22 April 1882) Musical Times (1 Aug 1884); (1 Aug 1885) The Stage (23 Oct 1902) 1861 census, TNA: PRO , RG 9/13 f

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Ernest Bullock

revised by K. D. Reynolds

musician , was born in Huddersfield on 22 August 1874, the eldest child and only son of James Oates Bairstow , wholesale clothier, and his wife, Elizabeth Adeline, née Watson. His father had a tenor voice and was a member of the Huddersfield Choral Society. Bairstow was educated at the high school, Nottingham , where his grandparents lived, until in 1889 his father retired and the family moved to London where he attended the Grocers' Company's School at Hackney Downs , and later had coaching from a private tutor. In Huddersfield he had been taught the

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painter, signing his works C. H. C. B. He exhibited in 1907 at the Royal Academy and in 1909–16 at the New English Art Club , also serving as the club's honorary secretary from 1921 to 1925. His paintings are now held by Manchester City Galleries , Leeds City Art Gallery , and Huddersfield Art Gallery. In 1911 he began to figure as an art critic, contributing articles to The Outlook and to the Saturday Review; he also accepted an appointment as private assistant to Sir Charles Holroyd , director of the National Gallery , rising to the rank of keeper in 1914

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Baldick, Robert André Édouard ( 1927–1972 ) Baldick, Robert André Édouard ( 1927–1972 ), French scholar and translator , was born on 9 November 1927 at 69 Heaton Road, Paddock, Huddersfield, Yorkshire , the only son of George Sidney Baldick , schoolmaster, and his French wife, Marie Octavie Angéla, née Marielle. He was educated at Royds Hall Grammar School, Huddersfield , and Queen's College, Oxford , where he read French and German, graduating with a first in 1948. In 1952 he was awarded his DPhil for a groundbreaking thesis on the French novelist Joris-Karl

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undertaking sea banking and draining in Holderness. In 1791 Banks became contractor on the Leeds and Liverpool Canal , and in 1793 under the engineer John Rennie (1761–1821) worked on the Lancaster and Ulverston canals , rapidly extending his operations in 1795–7 to the Huddersfield (including the 3½ mile Marsden Tunnel ), Peak Forest , and Ashton under Lyne canals. In 1800 he worked on several Derbyshire canals under William Jessop , as well as on tram roads and turnpikes, and began a carrying trade in coal and limestone, employing thirty barges

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born on 15 February 1911 at 37 Bland Street, Lockwood, Huddersfield , in the West Riding of Yorkshire , the elder son of John Arthur Batley , iron moulder, and his wife, Beatrice, née Fawley , weaver. Although he passed the entrance examination for Huddersfield College , the local grammar school, his family decided to send him to Hillhouse central school , which he left at the age of fourteen to work as a clerk for the firm of Mills and Best , solicitors. After five years he moved to the Huddersfield YMCA as assistant general secretary, and in 1932 he became

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6–0 in the final at Halifax. In 1920 Batten scored the only try of the game when Hull beat Huddersfield 3–2 at Headingley to lift their first rugby league championship. Hull retained the trophy in 1921 after defeating Hull Kingston Rovers in the final. In 1922 he was a try-scorer in Hull's 9–10 challenge cup final defeat by Rochdale Hornets and was again a scorer when the club won its first Yorkshire challenge cup in 1923 by defeating Huddersfield 10–4 in the final. Batten also helped Hull to win the Yorkshire league championship twice. In

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Victoria House, Stanley Road, Halifax, Yorkshire , the fourth child and only daughter of Joseph Edwin Bentley (1855–1926) , master dyer and finisher, and his wife, Eleanor Kettlewell (1859–1949) , daughter of Thomas Kettlewell , representative of a cloth-manufacturing firm in Huddersfield, Yorkshire. She was educated at the Princess Mary High School for Girls, Halifax , and, from 1910, at Cheltenham Ladies' College , where she studied for an external London University degree. In 1914 she was awarded a first-class pass degree, an indication that she should have

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and harpsichord in London's concert life, 1750–1800: a calendar of advertised performances’, A handbook for studies in 18th-century English music , ed. M. Burden and I. Cholij, 8 (1997), 27–72 R. Cowgill, ‘Calendar of Mozart performances in London, 1801–29’, 1996, University of Huddersfield [database] M. Sands, ‘Billington, Elizabeth’, Grove, Dict. mus. (1954) DNB Archives Sound Barbara Harbach (harpsichord), Sonatas Op. 1 and 2 (1995), Hester Park CD 7703 Likenesses F. Bartolozzi, stipple, pubd 1786 (after R. Cosway), BM J. Reynolds, portrait, 1789, Beaverbrook

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election in 1929 (and won), an early sign of the political commitment that for most of his life—working in the BBC where impartiality was expected—he had to suppress. He went on to St Andrews University to read English before entering journalism on local papers in Leeds and Huddersfield and thence, in 1938, the Manchester Guardian. The outbreak of the Second World War saw Bonarjee volunteer: he served with the Royal Sussex regiment and then the Lancashire fusiliers , reaching the rank of captain. Demobilized, Bonarjee returned to journalism in 1946, but

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C. W. Sutton

revised by Frank Foden

examination committee and an active promoter of a workable scheme. His first examination, in thirteen subjects, was held in June 1856 and attracted fifty-six candidates. Its success encouraged the society to extend its efforts and in 1857 examinations were held in London and Huddersfield , attracting 220 candidates who worked 546 papers. Booth was then re-elected chairman of council. He wished to have more centres, and called for the examinations to be placed on an independent, professional footing, with their own office, funds, and paid examiners. However in this