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Bedford willow, Salix russelliana ( 4.186–7 ), identified by Abbot as a distinct species. Abbot is also mentioned in contemporary entomological literature, for he possessed a large collection of insects. In 1798 he made the first captures in England of Papilio paniscus , the chequered skipper, and in Bedfordshire of Papilio charlotta , a fritillary, sending specimens to the lepidopterist Adrian Hardy Haworth FLS , who acknowledged them, and others, in Prodromus lepidopterum Britannicorum (1802). Abbot made contributions to Magna Britannia ( 1806, vol

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Courant , and his wife, Elizabeth ( d. 1771/2) , daughter of John Buckley. Orion Adams's ' instability and eccentricities ' ( GM ) meant that it was Elizabeth Adams and not he who succeeded to the paper in 1742 and Adams embarked on a life which was ' a lamentable scene of chequered events '. In the 1740s Adams was active as a master printer in Northgate Street, Chester , where a chapbook entitled The Suffolk Garland is recorded from his press in 1747. On 18 November 1750 he married Ann Holliwell at Frodsham. By 1752 Adams was in Manchester , where

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Percy Low , who was also a Conservative agent. The new Lady Addison manifestly did not share Addison's radicalism. However, as a poised and supportive wife she sustained his morale and enduring ambition. They lived in the village of Radnage , in Buckinghamshire , quite near Chequers. Addison remained prominent in public debate during the war, speaking out on land issues and on post-war reconstruction. Of particular importance was the close relationship he struck up with his Buckinghamshire neighbour, the Labour leader, Clement Attlee. The latter enormously

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earlier works still privately owned. Turner was an artist of whom he spoke with great warmth and understanding. He became founder chairman of the Friends of the Courtauld Institute in 1970, chairman of the Society of London Art Dealers in 1970–74, an adviser to the trustees of Chequers , and was involved in many charities. Knighted in 1973, he died at his home, Flat 3, 6 Onslow Square, London , on 22 November 1986, and his body was cremated at Putney. The firm still flourishes and remains an essentially family concern: it has played a major role in the English

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Fairfield (1843–1906) and his wife, Isabella Campbell Mackenzie (1853–1921). Her name at birth was Cecily Isabel (she altered Cecily to Cicily to agree with the spelling used by an earlier Fairfield ). Rebecca West's adventuresome, individualist Anglo-Irish father had a chequered career. Born in co. Kerry , he was an officer in the Prince Consort's Own Rifle Brigade , and an anti-socialist journalist turned financial commentator and speculator. His travels took him to the United States (where he reputedly bore stretchers in the civil war, managed a sawmill

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Likenesses oils, 1560–99, NPG [see illus.] oils, other versions, 1560–99, NPG , Royal Collection R. Elstrack, print, 1618, BM medal, BM portrait, Hever Castle, Kent portrait, repro. in R. Strong, Tudor and Jacobean portraits , 2 vols. (1969), pl. 10; priv. coll. ring, Trustees of Chequers

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Matthew Newcomen of Dedham. Widows of old friends such as John Ball , William Taylor , and the ' Love plotter ', Thomas Cawton , were not forgotten. Ashe's property, mainly in Derbyshire and Lincolnshire , must have been worth some £5000 , suggesting that his rather chequered career had been materially rewarding. The looming difficulties for City presbyterians were clearly in Ashe's mind, and his will arranged for rings to be given to ' forty ministers my friends in London and elsewhere ' with the inscription, ' I am not ashamed of the Gospell of

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T. F. Henderson

revised by Rebecca Mills

commission , but, getting into debt, and faced with allegations of embezzlement, he resigned his office and retired to Switzerland. Ashe then spent several years in foreign travel, living, according to his own account, in a free and unconstrained fashion, and enjoying a somewhat chequered fortune. In America his adventures included editing the National Intelligencer for a time, arguing with Thomas Jefferson , and sending the first mammoth bones back to Britain. He was also arrested for attempting to steal treasures from churches in Latin America. Back in

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Atkins, John ( bap. 1685, d. 1757 ) Atkins, John ( bap. 1685, d. 1757 ), naval surgeon , the son of John and Grace Atkins , was baptized on 26 November 1685 at Plaistow, Essex. He served a professional apprenticeship before commencing a chequered naval career in March 1701 as surgeon's mate of the Charles Galley. He progressed to first mate of the Somerset , where he successfully treated head injuries and splinter and gunshot wounds sustained during Sir George Rooke's action off Malaga in 1704, and his captain found him diligent, respectful, sober

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Durham Cathedral , on which he worked countrywide, All Saints', Newton Heath (1814–16), was the only one wholly rebuilt to his designs. Between 1804 and 1834 some twelve country houses were built or remodelled to his designs in the Gothic or castle style. His gothicization of Chequers, Buckinghamshire (1823), was considered exquisite by Sir Alexander Croke ( Major , 48 ). Of four houses in Scotland , as well as his Gothic reconstruction (1803–12) of Scone Palace for the third earl of Mansfield , Abbotsford (1816–23) for Sir Walter Scott was notable,

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marquess of Dorset (1477–1530) , and his second wife, Margaret. Audley's second marriage may have brought as much grief as good. Though it made him cousin by marriage to the king, his father-in-law had been in and out of favour with both Henry VII and Henry VIII during a chequered career, and on 28 June 1541 Dorset's brother Leonard Grey, Viscount Graney ( c.1490–1541) , was executed for treason. Audley himself insisted, in a letter in which he sued for grants of former monastic land in order to ensure an estate for his heirs, that he had married at

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a hardship fund for Downing Street staff and dependants to be administered by the wife of the prime minister of the day. Lucy Baldwin enjoyed entertaining, preferred London to the country, and did not share her husband’s love of walking (although they both felt affection for Chequers , which had recently been donated as a country residence for prime ministers). One of their daughters observed that ‘two people could not have been more unlike’, but ‘should they ever differ, it was always done quietly and politely’ ( Margaret Huntington-Whiteley, in Hyde, 43 ).

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in December 1923 was a net loss of eighty-eight seats; the Conservatives had lost their majority, although they remained the largest single party in the House of Commons. Baldwin's first reaction was that he should resign as prime minister immediately, but after reflecting at Chequers over the weekend of 8–9 December he decided to stay in office and meet parliament. Resignation would open the way to revived coalitionism and efforts to deny Labour the chance of office, while there were tactical advantages in making the Liberals side openly with Labour. After

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tomb for a time rivalled that of St James of Compostela as a pilgrim shrine in western Christendom, in his lifetime and again after the Reformation he was a controversial figure. Most observers have considered that he was not a born saint. It would also seem that his brilliant, if chequered, career had a mostly harmful effect on all those connected with it. And in whatever way the causes for which he fought are regarded, the zeal with which he advanced them would appear excessive. But he must also be credited with important achievements. On the matter of the ‘evil’ royal

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(14 Aug 2001) ‘GPO tower’, Architects' Journal (22 June 1966), 1357–50 ‘Radio campanile’, Architecture Review , 138/822 (Aug 1965), 123–6 ‘Museum telephone exchange and radio tower’, The Builder , 207 (7 Aug 1964), 265–8 The Post Office Tower, London (1967) ‘Eric Bedford had a chequered career’, Icon (May 2003), 42–3 ‘Mediocre Marsham Street’, Building Design , 624 (14 Jan 1983) www.lightstraw.co.uk/ate/main/postofficetower/ , 25 March 2011 ‘Offices for the British embassy in Washington’, Official Architecture and Planning , 23 (Dec 1960), 545–6 J. Osley, Built

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Noble, Memoirs of the protectoral house of Cromwell , 2 vols. (1787) R. W. Ramsey, Studies in Cromwell's family circle (1930), chap. 3 R. Sherwood, Oliver Cromwell : king in all but name, 1653–58 (1997), esp. chap. 9 Report on the manuscripts of Mrs Frankland-Russell-Astley of Chequers Court, Bucks. , HMC , 52 (1900) Report on manuscripts in various collections , 8 vols., HMC , 55 (1901–14), vol. 2 CSP dom. , 1656–60 Thurloe, State papers BL , Add. MS 69377 will, TNA: PRO , PROB 11/533, sig. 130 will of Thomas, Earl Fauconberg, TNA: PRO , PROB 11/460, quire

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Coxwold parish church on 30 January 1701. He was succeeded by his nephew Thomas Belasyse , the second earl. Victor Stater Sources CSP Venice , 1657–9; 1669–71 CSP dom. , 1656–7; 1659–61; 1663–4; 1666–7; 1686–7 Report on the manuscripts of Mrs Frankland-Russell-Astley of Chequers Court, Bucks. , HMC , 52 (1900) Report on manuscripts in various collections , 8 vols., HMC , 55 (1901–14), vol. 2 GEC, Peerage P. Aubrey, Mr Secretary Thurloe : Cromwell's secretary of state, 1652–1660 (1990) The writings and speeches of Oliver Cromwell , ed. W. C. Abbott and

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Beresford joined the advance without any specific command. He fought well at Salamanca , where he was wounded. At this juncture the topic of Wellington's statements about Beresford's abilities came into view and even today pose something of a dilemma. Despite Beresford's chequered performance in the Albuera campaign of 1811, Wellington , toward the end of 1812, spoke of him as ' the ablest man I have yet seen with the army, the one having the largest views … [and] the only person capable of conducting a large concern ' ( Supplementary Despatches , 7.484

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to the County of Gloucester. Richard Bigland , keen to get his father's magnum opus into print, employed James Dallaway to edit the work, and between 1786 and 1794 the first and second volumes, covering 180 parishes, were issued in instalments. Thereafter, the project had a chequered history, and the remaining sections appeared in fits and starts between 1819 and 1889. Material relating to two Bristol parishes remained unpublished until the whole work was reprinted in the 1990s. Gloucestershire is probably unique in possessing such a comprehensive record of

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period between his matriculation on 10 March 1657 and his graduation as BA the following year. Billingsley dedicated his first published work to the Bristol physician whom he believed had saved his life. Billingsley's first two collections of poetry were the product of these chequered years. Brachy-martyrologia, or, A breviary of all the greatest persecutions which have befallen the saints and people of God from the creation to our present times , published in May 1657 with dedications dated 11 March and 6 April 1656, told selections from Foxe's book of martyrs