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Device, Alizon ( d. 1612 ) See Pendle witches Lancashire witches

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Device, Elizabeth ( b. before 1572, d. 1612 ) See Pendle witches Lancashire witches

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Device, James ( d. 1612 ) See Pendle witches Lancashire witches

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Device, Jennet ( b. 1602/3 ) See Pendle witches Lancashire witches

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Nutter, Alice ( d. 1612 ) See Pendle witches Lancashire witches

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Pendle witches Lancashire witches ( act. 1612 ) Pendle witches Lancashire witches ( act. 1612 ), represented one of the larger groups of witches prosecuted in early modern England and one of the most famous. The mass of confessions and testimonies elicited before and during the trials at Lancaster in 1612 recalled events of up to eighteen years before and involved tensions between mothers and children, siblings, neighbours, and landlords and tenants. At least nineteen alleged witches were charged at Lancaster assizes on 17 August 1612. Of these at least

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Potts, Thomas ( fl. 1610–1614 ) See Pendle witches Lancashire witches

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Preston, Jennet ( d. 1612 ) See Pendle witches Lancashire witches

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Redfearn, Anne ( d. 1612 ) See Pendle witches Lancashire witches

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in or after 1677 ) Robinson, Edmund ( b. 1622x4, d. in or after 1677 ), witch accuser , was the son of Edmund Robinson (also known as Edmund Rough, alias Robinson) , a mason or waller of Wheatley Lane in the chapelry of Newchurch in Pendle, Lancashire. His mother's name is not known; she was alive in 1634 and, he acknowledged, had brought him up to spin wool and fetch home her cattle. In 1634 Robinson made allegations which led to the second major Lancashire or Pendle witch trial twenty-two years after the first and more famous trial of 1612. Edmund's

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Sowthernes, Elizabeth [ alias Demdike; known as Old Demdike] ( c. 1532–1612 ) See Pendle witches Lancashire witches

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Whittle, Anne ( c. 1532–1612 ) See Pendle witches Lancashire witches

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a product of Leslie Stephen's agnosticism and his desire to expose what he regarded as the silliness of religious fanaticism. New articles on witches are critically framed; there are several group articles— Essex witches , Pendle witches , and Salem witches —which explore the popular religious culture and social anxieties out of which witchcraft accusations arose. The article on Isobel Gowdie (1662) , alleged witch, who operated within a network of covens and whose confessions revealed not just demonology but fascination with fairies, emphasizes the atypicality