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of the Irish. Abernethy was enthusiastic about this enterprise: Duchal indicates that from this date it took over much of his diary. Though never on the synod's list of Irish speakers he must have developed sufficient fluency. He began to visit the Irish community alongside Lough Neagh with some regularity, preaching in public and conversing in private. The number of long-term converts was probably small but when there were attempts to move him to another congregation, in 1717–18, an Irish-speaking deputation lobbied the meetings of the synod. Benjamin Hoadly's

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coloured map during his first days. What, he asked, were the areas in orange? They were the protestant loyalists, he was told. And the green patches? Those were the Catholic republicans. And what was the area marked in blue? After some hesitation, ' That, Secretary of State, is Lough Neagh ' ( The Guardian , 8 Oct 1996 ). Jokes aside, Atkins's life was made hell by Mrs Thatcher's demands for instant results to be imposed on Ulster's warring politicians, then including Ian Paisley and a transplanted Enoch Powell. Behind the scenes the army urged that he make

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then beginning to inhabit it ' ( Lodge MS, G. IV. 5, fol. 82 ). Wesley also recorded something of Barton's eccentricity on his visit in 1756, pointing out that he lived in a house near Lough Neagh with no doors and few windows. Barton's other source of fame was his concentration for nearly twenty years from the early 1730s on the topography and natural history of Lough Neagh and its hinterland. In 1738 he was already in touch with the noted historian and topographer Walter Harris , who later founded the Physico-Historical Society and recorded Barton's name

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E. I. Carlyle

revised by Alan Muir Wood

assisted him; he left the firm to study medicine. Binnie acted as principal engineering adviser to the Metropolitan Water Board during arbitration relating to the purchase of the water companies in 1903–4. In 1906 he reported to the government of Ireland on the Bann and Lough Neagh drainage scheme. From 1905 to 1907 he served as chairman of the vice-regal commission on the arterial drainage of Ireland. He visited Malta in 1909 to report on water supply. In 1909, on the death of George Frederick Deacon , the practices of Binnie and Deacon were combined

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being the Book of Armagh , now displayed with the Book of Kells in the library of Trinity College, Dublin. In addition to being a transcriber and translator of Gaelic manuscripts, including an elegy on Owen Roe O'Neill , he carried out experiments on fossilized wood from Lough Neagh , close to his estate, with a view to finding out whether it was a vegetable or a mineral. As a politician he trod a careful middle way and appears to have done so very successfully. His real concern was with his role as a country gentleman and a landlord in co. Armagh. During

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Captain John Perry to take soundings and make a chart of Dublin harbour , but their resulting proposals were rejected by the ballast board. However, their map of the harbour was published in 1728. In 1729 he prepared an estimate for making a navigable passage from Newry to Lough Neagh to supply the city of Dublin with coals from co. Tyrone. Burgh's interest in coalmining dates from at least as early as 1721, when he and his partner the Hon. Richard Stewart received the first £2000 of a total of £8000 from the Irish government for their operation of

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weather. When the war ended he enrolled for a course in meteorological research under David Brunt at Imperial College, London. His principal mentor was P. A. (‘Peter’) Sheppard , with whom he collaborated in a sequence of experiments on the turbulence of wind over the sea, at Lough Neagh , on the Isles of Scilly , and in the Caribbean. His work earned him the degree of MSc. On 21 September 1946 he married (Eva) Mary Dickinson ( b. 1923) , a pharmacist, whom he had met at college in Blackburn. They stayed together until his death in 1997, and had a son, Henry

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PRO, SP 63/207iii/53 ). Ruthlessly efficient in the manner in which he subsequently carried out this policy of ' extermination ' ( Falls , 67 ), it was this trait which earned him his elevated status in the pantheon of English hate-figures in Irish history. After one raid across Lough Neagh , Chichester personally testified that he spared neither woman, child, nor beast. On reflection, he acknowledged that in this period of his career in Ireland he had been among the ' wasters and destroyers ', though he later preferred to join the ranks of the ' builders and planters

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the annals from 626 until his death in 637, and in the regnal list of the province of Ulster he is given a reign of ten years. He is also included in the regnal list of Dál nAraidi , whose principal kingdom was Mag Line , the valley of the Antrim Water on the east side of Lough Neagh. By the end of the seventh century Dál nAraidi had expanded along the east side of the River Bann as far as Coleraine , but this may only just have started in Congal's day. The genealogies of Dál nAraidi either place Congal in different places or omit his name altogether:

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Ireland from Galway Bay to Dublin Bay. Conn was said to have been born at Tara , a site with pagan associations, the symbolic seat of those who claimed the kingship of Ireland in the middle ages. At his birth three great rivers sprang up, and three lakes ( Lough Neagh , Lough Rea , and Lough Leane ), and three famous trees. This may be connected with the concept that the king was the bringer of fertility. However, it has been suggested—notably by T. F. O'Rahilly —that Conn was originally a god. One meaning of his name is ' sense, wisdom ', and there is

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village of Blackheath , near Guildford , in Surrey , to write full time. Crofts was recalled to Ulster in 1930 when the government of Northern Ireland appointed him to inquire into the ' objections lodged against the draft scheme for the drainage of the River Bann and Lough Neagh '. He reported within a month, finding ' nothing which could not be met by compensation or slight modification of detail '. 1930 also saw the publication of Sir John Magill's Last Journey , set in Ulster as was the dénouement of his ingenious Fatal Venture (1939). Following

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of north-eastern Ireland. Two of them were to succeed Diarmait when he was killed in 565 by a Cruithnian prince, Áed Dub. According to some annals, this took place in Ráith Becc in Mag Line , the kingdom situated in the valley of the Antrim Water on the east side of Lough Neagh. Later accounts suggest that his body was buried at Connor, Antrim , but the head at Clonmacnoise. The annalists' picture of Diarmait mac Cerbaill seriously underestimates his significance. The reference to the last feast of Tara has been interpreted as the final celebration

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Flaithbertach attacked a viking camp at Lough Neagh and destroyed their fleet. When Flaithbertach was slain in 949 the death was a blow to Domnall and for some years he is not mentioned in the chronicles. In 954, he led an army into Brega in a challenge to the high-king Congalach mac Máele Mithig. The next year, 955, Domnall conducted the first of his interesting naval manoeuvres when he removed his ships from Lough Neagh , and had them transported first across Airgialla to Lough Erne , and then to Connacht , to Lough Oughter , in order to devastate Bréifne

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Doloranda Hannah Pember

October 1927, at her eighth attempt, she became the first Englishwoman to swim the channel (from France to England in 15 hr 15 min.). In 1928 she became the first person ever to swim the Straits of Gibraltar (in 12 hr 50 min.). Between 1927 and 1932 she also swam the Wash , Lough Neagh , from Portstewart in Ulster to Moville in the Irish Free State , Loch Ryan , the Firth of Forth , around the Isle of Man ( 100 miles ) in stages, the Hellespont (from Europe to Asia Minor ), the Sea of Marmora , Wellington harbour , Galway Bay , and from Cape

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reign as king of Dál nAraidi. His victory in 828 did not prevent serious developments in the 830s: one of the principal churches of the province, Connor , was sacked in 832; a crannog at Lough Bricrenn ( Loughbrickland, Down ) in the kingdom of Uí Echach Cobo was taken in 833; and viking pressure in the north-east came to a head with the establishment of a camp on Lough Neagh in 839, from which ' they plundered the peoples and churches of the north of Ireland ' ( Ann. Ulster , s.a. 839 ). They remained there until early in 841, but in that year new camps were

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ruling dynasty was exceedingly dangerous. The establishment of the fortified ' ship-ports ', longphuirt , at Dublin and Lind Duachaill in 841 had shifted the main sphere of viking attacks from the north to the midlands. The vikings had temporary wintering camps, as on Lough Neagh in 839 or Lough Erne in 924–5; but Dublin became the principal permanent base of the vikings in Ireland , comparable with Kiev on the Dnieper , while Lind Duachaill in Louth was occupied until 927. The situation of the two early longphuirt of Dublin and Lind Duachaill —astride

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attacked a viking fleet at Carlingford Lough and began the first of a series of campaigns against the vikings that would continue to the end of his career. Among the viking casualties was an Albdan , son of Guthfrith; Muirchertach was to be killed by his brother Blacaire seventeen years later. A viking army led by Torulb sailed into Lough Neagh in 930 and plundered the countryside for several years; in 932 Muirchertach defeated that host, and killed Torulb , in a battle fought where the River Main flows into the lough. Muirchertach had ambitions beyond

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Tyrone , and Maguire maintained a war of attrition against the English while they perfected their military machine, sought alliance from elsewhere in Ireland and especially from Munster , and awaited Spanish aid. They defended Ulster along a line from the River Erne to Lough Neagh , O'Donnell maintaining the defence of the western side. From Tyrconnell there were two passages into Connaught , one over the Erne by Ballyshannon , the other by Enniskillen between the lakes. O'Donnell held Ballyshannon , the ' key of the province ' of Ulster (

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Colley Wellesley , father of the future duke of Wellington and then professor of music at Trinity College , urged O'Hara to respond to the Italian performers. O'Hara revised his slight mock pastoral Midas , which had been privately performed for William Brownlow MP at Lough Neagh , near Lurgan, co. Armagh , in April 1760. The Irish playwright John O'Keeffe recalled that, as a young boy, he was present at O'Hara's house in King Street, Stephen's Green , one morning when the three gentlemen, O'Hara , Lord Mornington , and Brownlow were settling the

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1793 and Viscount O'Neill in 1795. During his viceregal tour of the north of Ireland in 1787 the lord lieutenant, the duke of Rutland , visited him at Shane's Castle , and like other guests expressed admiration for the residence and its magnificent setting on the shore of Lough Neagh. To indulge his wife's enthusiasm for the acting of Sarah Siddons , O'Neill built a private theatre there, and persuaded the celebrated actress to give a performance in it; Siddons wrote of her enchantment on the occasion in her memoirs. Although sympathetic to the cause of