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Anderson, Christopher ( 1782–1852 ) Anderson, Christopher ( 1782–1852 ), theological writer and Baptist preacher , was born at West Bow, Grassmarket, Edinburgh , on 19 February 1782, and was the youngest son of William Anderson (1744–1804) , an ironmonger. Christopher was educated at Lasswade day school near Edinburgh. He worked initially in his father's trade and later in an insurance office, but because of his interest in Christian missions and his desire to become a foreign missionary, he relinquished his secular work, and studied for the ministry. His

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rock as a spiritual lodestone of immense proportions. Landscapes of Norfolk (where he and his wife, June Keeley , and daughter, Melanie , born in 1970, lived from 1981 to 1992), the deer forest of Glenartney , in Perthshire , and a painting of Edinburgh Castle from the Grassmarket , grim in substance and tone, marked his growing concern with the layerings of associations in landscapes historic, fictional, pictorial. Finally, having moved to London in 1992 he embarked on a series of paintings of the Thames , two of which ( The Thames at Low Tide and Thames

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Intended for the practice of the law ' ( Murray , 21 ), Baillie was studying in the Netherlands when news reached him of his father's arrest on charges of high treason arising from the Rye House plot. He returned home to Scotland and witnessed Robert's execution in the Grassmarket of Edinburgh on 24 December 1684. The Jerviswood estates were subsequently confiscated and Baillie fled to the Netherlands , where he joined a band of stalwart Presbyterian exiles, including his father's friend Sir Patrick Hume , whose daughter Grisell (1665–1746) [ see

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alleged role in the escape from the Tolbooth of the son of a Grassmarket stabler convicted of murder. Brodie's reputation also suffered with stories of his keeping, Macheath-style, two mistresses, Jean Watt and Anne Grant of Cant's Close, Edinburgh , with whom he had several illegitimate children. In August 1786 Brodie embarked on a series of burglaries, assisted by members of a criminal gang composed of acquaintances made during his frequent visits to the cockpits behind the Grassmarket. Among his targets were the bankers of the Royal Exchange , from

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Burke lost everything including, perhaps surprisingly, some books. His brother Constantine at that time also lived in Edinburgh , employed as a scavenger by the Edinburgh police establishment. Next Burke and Nelly McDougal were to be found at Brown's Close , off the Grassmarket , when their relationship had become rowdy, due, it was said, to drink and to Burke's constant infidelity. They went temporarily to the harvest at Penicuik where they met William Hare. A friendship developed, and Burke and McDougal went to lodge with Hare and his wife

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Margaret hid her pregnancy and it is unclear whether her child was stillborn or not. Contesting her innocence to the very end Margaret Dickson was none the less found guilty, under the act of 1690, for concealment of pregnancy. She was sentenced in 1728 to be hanged in the Grassmarket , near Edinburgh Castle. Chambers quotes from an unnamed broadside, printed within days of her execution, which gives minute detail of the proceedings. According to this account Margaret was hanged for the usual length of time, and the public executioner ' did his usual office

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was, by his own beliefs, a pious and principled young man, whose notoriety was considerably increased by rumours of his sufferings at the hands of his gaolers. On 10 October 1681 he was hanged at the ' Gallow-lee, betwixt Edinburgh and Leith ', rather than at the ' cross and grassmarket ', in order that as small a crowd as possible would be influenced by his demeanour and dying testament ( Wodrow , 3.287 ). His head and hands were cut off and placed on spikes at the Pleasance port of the town, which act served only to grant his last wish, that ' Mr Guthrie's

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Perthshire , the ninth son of John Gib , laird of Castletown in that parish, and his wife, Helen Bogie. He was educated at the University of Edinburgh where he studied medicine and excelled at mathematics. While at university he witnessed a public execution at the town's Grassmarket , leading to a conversion experience confirmed by his reading of Luther's commentary on Galatians which brought assurance of the love of God. He then decided to abandon his medical studies and to devote himself to the Christian ministry. Early in 1732 Gib attended the commission

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thoughts turned increasingly in a religious direction. Shortly before the fleet sailed, he decided to sell his command and quit the sea. As he became associated with an Edinburgh circle which included the clergymen Walter Buchanan , David Black , and John Erskine and the Grassmarket ironmonger John Campbell , Haldane's impulse towards evangelical religion gained momentum. Following the 1796 general assembly he made a short but significant tour of Perthshire and central Scotland with Charles Simeon (1759–1836) , vicar of Holy Trinity Church, Cambridge

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on the everyday offences of house-breaking, shop-breaking, thieving, resetting (receiving stolen goods), and fraud. McLevy developed a gift for connecting with the inhabitants of the Old Town ‘conglomerates’, which included the overcrowded wynds and closes of the Cowgate , Grassmarket , and West Port. There he built up an intricate network of informers, acquiring especial knowledge of the common lodging houses regarded by contemporaries as hotbeds of criminality. Pawnbrokers and second-hand goods dealers, known in Edinburgh as brokers, constituted another

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the commissioners ruled the extract from the register to be inadmissible evidence. The next day, 10 January, the court found Mitchell guilty of a capital crime on his own confession, and declared that the promise of life was not proven. He was executed on 18 January 1678 in the Grassmarket in Edinburgh. He left behind his wife, who was suffering from fever and had just given birth to a child. Their son, also called James , graduated from Edinburgh University in 1698 and later became a Church of Scotland minister. Mitchell's trial did considerable damage to

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Nasmyth, Alexander ( 1758–1840 ) Alexander Nasmyth ( 1758–1840 ) by Andrew Geddes , c. 1820–25 in the collection of the Royal Scottish Academy Nasmyth, Alexander ( 1758–1840 ), artist and engineer , was born on 9 September 1758 at his father's house at Anderson's Land in the Grassmarket, Edinburgh , the second of two children of Michael Naesmyth (1719–1803) , an architect and builder, and his wife, Lillias Anderson, known as Mary , widow of Robert Naesmyth. Alexander's great-grandfather, grandfather, and father, all named Michael Naesmyth , worked for the

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eighth day of her sickness ' ( Howie , 494 ). In November 1685 Nisbet was captured at Fenwick, Ayrshire. His companions were shot in the ensuing scuffle, but for the sake of the reward Nisbet was spared, and imprisoned in the Tolbooth at Edinburgh. He was executed at the Grassmarket on 4 December 1685, ' in the fifty-eighth year of his age ' ( Howie , 505 ). Nisbet wrote a brief 'Relation' of his trial before the privy council (at which he denounced the king as a papist), which is reproduced in Robert Wodrow's History of the Sufferings of the Church

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1684. Paton was found guilty of open rebellion and high treason covering the years 1666 to 1684, though most of the emphasis at his trial was placed on his taking part in the battle of Bothwell Bridge. His goods were pronounced forfeit and he was condemned to be hanged at the Grassmarket in Edinburgh on 23 April. However, on 17 April, in response to his petition, an action which he appears to have later regretted, the privy council postponed his execution until 30 April, when he was further reprieved and granted ' a roume by himself that he may more conveniently

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W. A. Shaw

revised by H. C. G. Matthew

opposition to the union between the Anti-Burgher and the Burgher synods led him to resign his professorship and to his withdrawal from the General Associate Synod in 1820. He then became pastor to a body of sympathizers, who seceded with him, in a vacant chapel adjacent to the Grassmarket under Castle Hill. A new church was built in Infirmary Street , which his preaching soon filled, and he and his congregation joined with the Constitutional Presbytery of Seceders to which Dr Thomas McCrie belonged, and thus formed a new connexion styled the Associate Synod

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Tolbooth to be increased on 8 September. There were thus only fifteen unarmed guards on duty on the evening of 7 September. At about 9 p.m. a crowd began to gather in the Portsburgh , west of the Grassmarket. Apparently well organized and about 4000 strong, the crowd entered the city through the West Port which they immediately secured. They crossed the Grassmarket to the Cowgate where they secured both the Cowgate and Netherbow ports, cutting the city off from the regular troops at Holyrood. The crowd then made its way up the High Street and overpowered

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1765. The school had been founded by James VI and I's jeweller, George Heriot , for the education of the orphaned children of tradesmen. The building had been erected between 1628 and the end of the seventeenth century in a Scots Renaissance style on a plateau of land above the Grassmarket , which lay to the south of the castle ramparts. The nine-year-old boy, after a quite long, uphill trek from his home, must initially have felt overwhelmed by the sheer presence of this immense, four-square building, still one of the most impressive in Edinburgh. While pursuing

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Murray G. H. Pittock

Brown , 12 ). Following his mother's death, about January 1701 Ramsay went to be apprenticed (as his brother Robert had been in 1695) to a wigmaker in Edinburgh , receiving back his indentures in either 1707 or 1709, after which he opened his own business (by tradition in the Grassmarket , though no firm evidence for this appears to exist). Ramsay was admitted a burgess of Edinburgh on 19 July 1710. In 1711 he moved to a shop trading under the sign of the Mercury; this was possibly in the north parish, where he was living in 1712–13. By 1714 he had moved to

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suffered much more than John did ' ( Boswell for the Defence , 300 ). Once it became clear that his efforts to save Reid had failed Boswell turned his attention to the possibility of rehabilitation after hanging, a scheme that he hoped to implement at Reid's execution at the Grassmarket , on 21 September 1774. In the end attempts to resuscitate Reid came to nothing, as the body was left to hang for nearly an hour before being taken to Muiravonside for burial. Though only a relatively brief episode in the journal, Reid's trial offers insight into Boswell

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contract dispute at Taymouth , of 1811, and the Calton Hill plans in 1813, and was the arbiter between John Paterson and the Eglinton trustees in 1821 in a dispute concerning the construction costs of Eglinton Castle. In 1823 he proposed a new street through Edinburgh's Grassmarket and Cowgate , terminating at the Pleasance. Yet, apart from the county buildings, Perth (1812–14), there appear to have followed some lean years until ' His Majesty's Architect in Scotland ' was appointed to design Wick town hall in 1821. In 1824 Reid became ' Sole Master