1-14 of 14 Results  for:

  • Law and crime x
  • forger or fraudster x
  • Church of England x
Clear all

Article

Annesley, Richard, sixth earl of Anglesey (bap. 1693, d. 1761), kidnapper and bigamist, was baptized on 26 November 1693 at St Peter's Cathedral, Exeter, Devon, the third son of Dr Richard Annesley (1654/5–1701), dean of Exeter, from c.1700 third Baron Altham, and his wife, ...

Article

Steven C. Bullock

Bell, Thomas (b. 1713), fraudster, was born on 18 February 1713 in Boston, Massachusetts, the first of three recorded children of Thomas Bell (d. 1729), sea captain and shipwright, and his wife, Johanna Adams. The younger Thomas, who became known as Tom Bell...

Image

Elizabeth Chudleigh (c. 1720–1788) by Thomas Gainsborough Christie's Images Ltd. (2004)

Article

Chudleigh, Elizabeth [married namesElizabeth Hervey, countess of Bristol; Elizabeth Pierrepont, duchess of Kingston upon Hull] (c. 1720–1788), courtier and bigamist, was born probably at the family estate of Ashton, Devon. She was the younger daughter and youngest child of Colonel Thomas Chudleigh (...

Image

William Dodd (1729–1777) by John Russell, 1769 © National Portrait Gallery, London

Article

Dodd, William [nicknamed the Macaroni Parson] (1729–1777), Church of England clergyman and forger, was born in Bourne, Lincolnshire, the eldest of the six children of the Revd William Dodd (1703?–1757), vicar of Bourne. He was probably born on 29 May 1729 (...

Article

Sidney Lee

revised by M. J. Mercer

Gahagan, Usher (d. 1749), classical scholar and coiner, came from a family in co. Westmeath, Ireland, but nothing more is known about his background or early life. He attended Trinity College, Dublin, with the intention of entering the law but his conversion to Catholicism while a student prevented him from being called to the bar. He left without taking a degree and was disowned by his parents. He married a wealthy heiress, whom he treated cruelly, and they soon separated. His conduct alienated his remaining friends, and with mounting debts he moved to ...

Image

George Hudson [the Railway King] (1800–1871) by Sir Francis Grant, 1846 York City Art Gallery

Article

Hudson, George [called the Railway King] (1800–1871), railway promoter and fraudster, was born in March 1800 at Howsham, about 12 miles north-east of York, the fifth son of a farmer who died in 1806. He went to local schools and in 1815 was apprenticed to ...

Article

Ivie, Edward (d. 1698), informer and coiner, was the youngest son of Thomas Ivie of Wincanton, Somerset, where his father and elder brother served as parish officers. His uncle was the puritan activist and civic reformer John Ivie of Salisbury, who made his view of ...

Article

Lincoln, Ignatius Timotheus Trebitsch [formerly Ignácz Trebitsch; name in religion Chao Kung] (1879–1943), political adventurer, was born in Paks, Hungary, on 4 April 1879, the second son of Nathan Trebitsch (d. 1899), a merchant, and his wife, Julia, née Freund (...

Article

Paul, Sir John Dean, second baronet (1802–1868), banker and fraudster, was born on 27 October 1802, at 218 Strand, Westminster (adjacent to his father's bank), the eldest of three sons (there were four daughters) of Sir John Dean Paul, first baronet (1775–1852), and his wife, ...

Article

Spencer [married name Dowling or Dawlin], Barbara (c. 1697–1721), coiner, was born of 'mean parents' in the parish of St Giles Cripplegate, in London (Lives, 1.46). One of the more obscure figures in the criminal annals of the eighteenth century, very little is known of her early life. ...

Article

Young, Robert (c. 1656–1700), forger and false witness, had his criminal career to 1692, mainly as a clerical impostor, traced in unique detail through a dozen aliases by his intended victim Thomas Sprat, bishop of Rochester. Yet even Sprat could not certainly establish his origin. ...