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Badby, John (d. 1410), Lollard heretic  

Peter McNiven

Badby, John (d. 1410), Lollard heretic, was a craftsman (possibly a tailor or smith) of the diocese of Worcester, who achieved notoriety by his uninhibited denial of the doctrine of transubstantiation. Charged before his bishop, Thomas Peverell, on 2 January 1409, Badby insisted that the bread in the eucharist was not, and could not be, miraculously transformed into ...

Article

Cheyne, Sir John (c. 1390–1468), Lollard and rebel  

Linda Clark

Cheyne, Sir John (c. 1390–1468), Lollard and rebel, was the elder son of Roger Cheyne (1362–1414) of Drayton Beauchamp, Buckinghamshire, one of the leaders of the Lollard movement in the early fifteenth century. Roger may well have adopted his heretical leanings through the influence of the prominent Lollard knight and diplomat ...

Article

Cheyne, Sir John (d. 1414), diplomat, heretic, and speaker-elect of the House of Commons  

Nigel Saul

Cheyne, Sir John (d. 1414), diplomat, heretic, and speaker-elect of the House of Commons, of unknown parentage, was a scion of the family of Cheyne of Drayton Beauchamp, Buckinghamshire. Almost certainly a younger son, he was probably intended for a career in the church. ...

Article

Claydon, John (d. 1415), heretic  

Christina von Nolcken

Claydon, John (d. 1415), heretic, is first certainly recorded on 9 June 1386, when with five others he stood surety for John Northampton, formerly a controversial mayor of London, and for Northampton's associates John More and Richard Norbury. He may also have been the ...

Article

Fulkherd, Quentin [Quintin Folkhard] (fl. 1407–1410), alleged Lollard heretic  

John A. F. Thomson

Fulkherd, Quentin [Quintin Folkhard] (fl. 1407–1410), alleged Lollard heretic, is identified only in two English safe conducts from 1407, as 'Quintin Folkhard of Scotland', and in a batch of his letters dated 1410 and entitled Nova Scocie, which are preserved in a ...

Article

Latimer, Sir Thomas (1341–1401), soldier and alleged heretic  

Maureen Jurkowski

Latimer, Sir Thomas (1341–1401), soldier and alleged heretic, was the third son of Sir Warin Latimer of Braybrooke, Northamptonshire, and Katherine, daughter of John de la Warr, born between 10 and 17 September 1341. He is chiefly notable as the most conspicuous, if not the most fervent, member of a group of courtiers and soldiers disparaged by the chroniclers ...

Article

Neville, Sir William (c. 1341–1391), Lollard  

John A. F. Thomson

Neville, Sir William (c. 1341–1391), Lollard, was the fifth son of Ralph Neville, fourth Lord Neville (c. 1291–1367), of Raby, and his wife, Alice (c.1300–1374), daughter of Hugh, Lord Audley; he was the younger brother of John Neville, fifth Baron Neville...

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Oldcastle, John, Baron Cobham (d. 1417), soldier, heretic, and rebel  

John A. F. Thomson

Oldcastle, John, Baron Cobham (d. 1417), soldier, heretic, and rebel, came from a Herefordshire family that emerged in the fourteenth century.

Oldcastle's great-grandfather Peter is the earliest recorded member of his family, and his grandfather, another John, represented the shire in parliament in 1368 and 1372. His father, ...

Article

Payne, Peter [Peter Engliss] (d. 1455/6?), Wycliffite and Hussite heretic  

F. Šmahel

Payne, Peter [Peter Engliss] (d. 1455/6?), Wycliffite and Hussite heretic, was born at Hough on the Hill, near Grantham, Lincolnshire. According to Thomas Gascoigne (d. 1458), he was the son of a Frenchman and his English wife. He is referred to variously in the sources as ...

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Purvey, John (c. 1354–1414), Wycliffite heretic  

Anne Hudson

Purvey, John (c. 1354–1414), Wycliffite heretic, is usually identified with the John Purvey of Lathbury, Buckinghamshire, who was permitted to enter all priestly ranks on 13 March 1377 or 1378 (Lincoln reg. 12, fol. 161); he may have been a member of the ...

Article

Stephen [Bedeman], Laurence (d. in or before 1423), ecclesiastic and suspected heretic  

R. L. Poole

revised by Simon Forde

Stephen [Bedeman], Laurence (d. in or before 1423), ecclesiastic and suspected heretic, was a Cornishman. He is first recorded in 1372, as a scholar of Stapeldon Hall (later Exeter College), Oxford, where he became a fellow and ultimately rector, holding the latter office from 1379 until 16 April 1380. He had been awarded the degree of MA by 1378. On 20 September 1379 he obtained letters licensing him to proceed to all orders, but became only an acolyte the following day....

Article

Taylor, William (d. 1423), Lollard heretic  

John A. F. Thomson

Taylor, William (d. 1423), Lollard heretic, was born in Worcestershire, to unknown parents, and studied at Oxford. He was a master of arts by 1405–6, when he is recorded as principal of St Edmund Hall. He and his successor, Peter Payne, were probably responsible for making the hall a centre of Wycliffite teaching at ...

Article

Thorpe, William (fl. 1381–1407), Lollard preacher  

Anne Hudson

Thorpe, William (fl. 1381–1407), Lollard preacher, seems to have been a Yorkshireman. Documentary evidence concerning his life is scant, but in a letter of the north-country heretic Richard Wyche, written c.1402 but surviving only in a Bohemian copy, there is mentioned a sister '...

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White, William (d. 1428), priest and Lollard heretic  

Norman P. Tanner

White, William (d. 1428), priest and Lollard heretic, was of unknown origins. There is no indication of the date of his birth, and no clear evidence that he studied at a university. On 6 July 1422, described as a chaplain, he was brought before the convocation of ...

Article

Wyche, Richard (d. 1440), Lollard heretic  

John A. F. Thomson

Wyche, Richard (d. 1440), Lollard heretic, was probably from the diocese of Hereford. He was presumably educated at Oxford, and at his first trial, before Bishop Skirlawe of Durham (d. 1406), affirmed that he had been taught by men trained in law, although he also argued cogently on theological issues, including the eucharist. Nothing is known of his background before the trial, which probably took place in the winter of 1402–3. The ecclesiastical authorities clearly sought his submission rather than his condemnation, and tried to convince him by argument. Even after being sentenced to prison and degradation (a sentence which was evidently not carried out), he wrote an account of the trial to his friends. After a later recantation, between 1404 and 1406, ...