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Bulger, James Patrick (1990–1993), murder victim, was born in Liverpool on 16 March 1990, the first child of Ralph S. Bulger (b. 1964) and his wife, Denise Matthews (b. 1965). A younger brother was born after his death, and his parents separated in 1994. The family lived in ...

Article

Chester, Charles (c. 1554–1604), informer and wit, probably born in Bristol, was one of ten children of Dominic Chester (d. 1575), merchant and MP, and his wife, Mary (d. 1572), the daughter of Roger Barlow, merchant and explorer, and his wife, ...

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Robert Feilding (1650/5151–1712) by Jan van der Vaart, c.1678-79 (after Sir Peter Lely) © National Portrait Gallery, London

Article

Feilding, Robert (1650/51–1712), rake and bigamist, was born at Solihull, Warwickshire, the son of George Feilding, landowner, a kinsman of the earl of Denbigh. Nothing is known about his mother. He was admitted to the Middle Temple in 1673, but upon inheriting £600...

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Hugh of Lincoln [St Hugh of Lincoln, Little St Hugh] (c. 1246–1255), supposed victim of crucifixion, was the son of Beatrice of Lincoln. He is known as Little St Hugh to distinguish him from St Hugh, bishop of Lincoln (1140?–1200). His death, in all probability accidental, and most likely on 27 August 1255, was the catalyst for the accusation of ritual murder aimed at the Jewish community of ...

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P. A. Landon

revised by Mark Pottle

Mathew, Theobald (1866–1939), lawyer and wit, was born in London on 5 December 1866, the elder son of the judge Sir James Charles Mathew (1830–1908) and his wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Edwin Biron, vicar of Lympne, Kent. The family hailed from Tipperary and ...

Article

Tuck, Friar (fl. 15th cent.), legendary outlaw, may have originated in a real individual, but his mythic qualities as a member of Robin Hood's band are his own, and have become indelibly established in the popular mind. In the developed stories he enters the band, like other recruits, by a personal encounter with Robin Hood in which a contest of wits and physical prowess brings each to respect the other. Once in the greenwood, he dispenses joviality and brings a sly wisdom to the outlaws' councils. His clericity, ordinarily not much in evidence, gives him a status that strengthens rather than disturbs the structure of the band....