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Abingdon, Robert of [Robert Rich] (d. 1243), ecclesiastic and supposed hagiographer, was the younger brother of Edmund of Abingdon and his assistant in the administration of the diocese and province of Canterbury. He was the second son of Reginald the Rich and Mabel of Abingdon...

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Acton, Ralph (supp. fl. after 1179), supposed preacher and compiler of sermons, is said to have composed various series on the Sunday gospels and epistles, and on the gospels and epistles for saints' days, which are listed by Bale, with incipits, from three manuscripts no longer extant. ...

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Adam [Adam the Welshman] (c. 1130–1181), theologian and bishop of St Asaph, has on the authority of Du Boulay's Historia universitatis Parisiensis (1665), and of Thomas Tanner's Bibliotheca Britannico-Hibernica (1748), been confused with a fictitious Adam Angligena and, even in the most recent histories of the ...

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Adam Anglicus (supp. fl. 14th cent.), supposed theologian, is described in a treatise on the immaculate conception of the Virgin by the fifteenth-century Dominican Vincentius Bandellus as one of the notable theologians of the past, a doctor of Paris who in a commentary on the ...

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Adam the Carthusian (supp. fl. 1340), supposed religious writer, appears to be the creation of John Bale (d. 1563), who gave a distinct and false identity to one of the names under which Adam of Dryburgh (d. 1212?) was known. Of the six works that ...

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Ailnoth [Ælnoth] (fl. c. 1085–c. 1122), Benedictine monk and hagiographer, was an Englishman, from Canterbury, who spent his ecclesiastical career in Denmark. He was perhaps prior of the community of St Cnut at Odense, which was founded in 1095 as a daughter house of the Benedictine abbey of ...

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Ailred [Ælred, Æthelred] of Rievaulx (1110–1167), religious writer and abbot of Rievaulx, was probably the youngest of the three sons of Eilaf, the last hereditary priest of the church of St Andrew at Hexham, grandson of Eilaf, treasurer of Durham, and great-grandson of the learned ...

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Aldred (fl. c. 970), provost of Chester-le-Street and glossator, is known through three manuscripts. He added an interlinear Old English gloss and a colophon to the Lindisfarne gospels of c.698 (BL, Cotton MS Nero D.iv), four collects in honour of St Cuthbert...

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Alesius [formerly Allane or Alan], Alexander (1500–1565), Lutheran theologian and reformer, was born at Edinburgh on 23 April 1500. He is sometimes referred to as Ales, Aless, or Alesse, but the matriculation roll of St Andrews University records his native family name as ...

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Alnwick, Martin (d. 1336), Franciscan friar, theologian, and philosopher, doubtless came from Northumberland. Possibly the Martinus occasionally recorded as participating in Oxford disputations in the last years of the thirteenth century, he was certainly at Oxford by 1300, when he was among the friars presented to the bishop of ...

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Alnwick, William (c. 1275–1333), Franciscan friar and theologian, and bishop of Giovinazzo, took his name from Alnwick in Northumberland. The course of his later career suggests that he was born about 1275. Having become a Franciscan friar, he probably studied theology at his order's studium at ...

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Anselm (d. 1148), abbot of Bury St Edmunds and hagiographer, was the nephew of Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury (c.1033–1109), being the son of the latter's only sister and her husband, Burgundius. Anselm had discouraged Burgundius from joining him at Canterbury, but his nephew, a Benedictine, had been a monk at ...

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Ashby, Alexander of (1148/1154–1208/1214), prior of Canons Ashby, poet, and religious writer, appears in records of the Augustinian priory at Canons Ashby, Northamptonshire, and elsewhere between 1181 and 1205. His work on preaching, the De artificioso modo praedicandi (with a set of exemplary sermons), has been edited by ...

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Ashwardby, John (fl. c. 1380–c. 1400), theological controversialist, was admitted vicar of St Mary's, Oxford, on 26 November 1384, and had left it by July 1395; he was chancellor's commissary by 27 November 1391, by when he was doctor of theology; since the living of ...

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Askham [Ascham], Anthony (c. 1517–1559), writer on astronomy and almanac maker, was born at Kirby Wiske, near Northallerton, Yorkshire, the third son of John Ascham (d. 1544) of Kirby Wiske, who was a yeoman farmer and steward to Lord Scrope of Bolton...

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Babion [Babyon], Peter (supp. fl. 1150), supposed religious writer, is the creation of the bibliographer John Bale (d. 1563). In his notebook, the Index Britanniae scriptorum, Bale conflated two entries in the Catalogus of Henry Kirkestede (d. in or after 1378)...

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Bacon [Bacun], Robert (d. 1248), theologian, was born in the 1170s or 1180s, into a family of which nothing is known except that he had a sister Mabel, resident within the Forest of Savernake, Wiltshire. Bacon was to achieve distinction as a theologian and preacher; it is therefore frustrating that so little can be established about his early education. However, in 1948 ...

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Baconthorpe [Baco], John (c. 1290–1345x52), Carmelite friar and theologian, was born at Baconsthorpe, near South Erpingham in Norfolk. According to his younger contemporary John Trisse, Baconthorpe was 'tiny' (minimus), though 'very great in his wisdom and learning' (Xiberta, 206). Probably at a young age, he entered the Carmelite convent at ...

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Balnea, Henry (supp. fl. early 15th cent.), supposed religious writer, was stated by Thomas Tanner (1674–1735) to be the author of the Speculum spiritualium, an anonymous early fifteenth-century devotional and mystical miscellany associated with the Bridgettines and Carthusians which survives in at least eleven manuscripts as well as in an early edition printed in ...

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Bampton, John (fl. 1317–1341), Carmelite friar and theologian, according to John Bale (quoting an untraced Leland reference) came from the west country. He may possibly be identified with the Carmelite of the same name who was ordained deacon at Winchester on 17 December 1317, and who was listed as from the ...