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Abingdon, Henry (d. 1437), ecclesiastic and college head, probably came from Abingdon in Berkshire. He was first elected a fellow of Merton in 1390 and spent most of his later career either there or fulfilling his residential duties as a canon of Wells...

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Argentine, John (c. 1443–1508), physician and college head, was the most eminent of the first generation of Italian-trained doctors to return to a medical and academic career in England. He was born at Bottisham in Cambridgeshire, into a well-connected family; he entered Eton College...

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Badew, Richard (d. 1361), university principal and founder of University Hall, Cambridge, was born, towards the close of the thirteenth century, into an established knightly family which took its name from Great Baddow, near Chelmsford, Essex, where it had estates dispersed among several neighbouring villages. According to ...

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Baily, Thomas (c. 1527–1591), Roman Catholic priest and college head, was born in Yorkshire. On 3 June 1543, in his sixteenth year, he entered Clare College, Cambridge, as a scholar. He graduated BA in 1546. Wardale's Clare College says that the master and fellows of ...

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Barton [Berton], William (d. after 1382), theologian and university principal, originated in the diocese of Canterbury, and must have read the arts course at Oxford in the early 1350s. First recorded in 1356 as a fellow of Merton College, he vacated his fellowship in 1361, although he acted as a feoffee for the college as late as 1380. He was bachelor of theology by 1376 and doctor by 1380. He was admitted rector of ...

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Bloxham, John [Geffrei] (c. 1340–1387), theologian and college head, evidently came from Bloxham, Oxfordshire. He was elected fellow of Merton in 1361, and spent his whole life thereafter at the college, as bursar in 1365–7, and as warden from 16 October 1375 until his death. He studied theology as a fellow, and having completed all the requirements for the doctorate by October 1375 qualified as an inceptor in theology; but, presumably omitting to perform his necessary lectures as a regent master, he did not graduate as a doctor. He benefited from the ecclesiastical patronage of his college, becoming vicar of ...

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Boece [Boethius], Hector (c. 1465–1536), historian and college head, was born in Dundee into the Boyis or Bois family of Panbride in Angus (Forfarshire): Boethius is a Latinized version of the original name and Boece a retranslation. His father was probably Alexander Boyis (...

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Cawston [Causton], Michael (d. 1396), theologian and university principal, came from Norwich diocese (the village of Cawston is north-east of Norwich). His date of birth is unknown, but by 1354 he was a master of arts and in 1361 took his doctorate in theology at ...

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Chaundler, Thomas (c. 1417–1490), university principal and humanist scholar, was born at Wells, in St Cuthbert's parish, the son probably of William Chaundler and possibly the brother of Geoffrey and John, clerks of Somerset parishes. John Chaundler, bishop of Salisbury (1417–26), may have been a kinsman, and the ...

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Chubbes [Jubbis], William (c. 1444–1505/6), college head, came from Whitby in Yorkshire. Chubbes had a conventional career in arts and theology. He was ‘questionist’ (a student about to graduate BA) at Cambridge in 1465, BA and fellow of Pembroke College by 17 September 1466, and was ordained to that title on 14 March 1467. After graduating MA in 1468–9 he served ...

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Doget [Doket], John (d. 1501), humanist scholar and college head, was the nephew of Cardinal Thomas Bourchier, archbishop of Canterbury (d. 1486), to whom Doget must have owed much of the considerable church patronage later bestowed on him. He was born in ...

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Dokett [Doket], Andrew (c. 1410–1484), college head, was of uncertain origins, but there are indications from a pedigree of 1595, said in 1869 to be in the College of Arms, London, that he came of the Dukets of Grayrigg Hall, near Kendal, Westmorland...

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Hacomblen [Hacomplaynt], Robert (1455/6–1528), college head and composer, is of unknown parentage. The record of his admission in 1469, as a king's scholar, to Eton College, where he spent three years, provides all that is known of his origins: he was thirteen years old and from the parish of ...

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Hornby [Horneby], Henry (c. 1457–1518), college head, was the son of George and Emma Hornby, probably of West Deeping, Lincolnshire, where a George Hornby was keeper of horses to Lady Margaret Beaufort and Thomas, Lord Stanley in 1483. Henry graduated BA at Cambridge...

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W. A. J. Archbold

revised by Andrew A. Chibi

Hygdon, John (d. 1532), college head, was the brother of Brian Hygdon. After attending Westminster School, he was elected a fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, about 1495, and by 1498 he had proceeded MA. He was subsequently lecturer in sophistry, senior dean of arts, and second bursar. His own and ...

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Keyes [Keys], Roger (d. 1477), college head, was admitted to All Souls College, Oxford, as a legist in 1438 from Exeter diocese, and proceeded to the degree of BCnL. As warden from 1443 to 1445, in succession to the founding warden, Richard Andrewes...

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Lindores, Lawrence (d. 1437), natural philosopher and university principal, is first recorded as a Scottish student in Paris, taking his MA in 1393 under the nominalist Aegidius Jutfaes. Parisian records are wanting for the ten years before this, and nothing records his precise date or place of birth. As a master he presented pupils in arts up to 1401 at least; at the same time he was also studying in theology, in which he was a ...

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Millington, William (d. 1466), college head, was probably born at Pocklington, Yorkshire. His family background and early education are unknown, but there is a strong presumption that he received his training in arts at Cambridge. After he had acquired the degree of MA, he went on to study theology and had attained the degree of DTh by 1441. ...

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Nobys, Peter (b. c. 1480, d. in or after 1525), college head, son of John and Rose Nobys of Norwich diocese, is first recorded at Cambridge, graduating as BA on 27 January 1501. In 1503 he was admitted as a junior fellow at ...

Image

John Rainolds (1549–1607) by unknown artist by permission of the President and Scholars, Corpus Christi College, Oxford