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Alleyne [Allyn], Thomas (c. 1488–1558), clergyman and benefactor, was probably a native of Sudbury, Staffordshire, where he later made provision for the commemoration of his parents. A suggestion that he originated in the diocese of Salisbury and studied at Oxford seems to be without foundation. His father's name was most probably ...

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Hugh Ashton (d. 1522) by unknown sculptor © Crown copyright. NMR

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Ashton, Hugh (d. 1522), Catholic ecclesiastic and university benefactor, apparently never himself had a formal university education, his main expertise lying in administration and estate management. He probably first encountered Lady Margaret Beaufort, countess of Richmond and Derby, in Lancashire, his native county, and rose to prominence through this association. On 7 January 1496 he was admitted to the rectory of ...

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Aylward, Margaret Louisa (1810–1889), philanthropist and Roman Catholic nun, was born on 23 November 1810 in Thomas Street, Waterford, the fifth child of William Aylward (d. 1840), merchant, and his wife, Ellen Mullowney, née Murphy (c.1781–c.1860). There were ten children born of the marriage, and a half-brother, from ...

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Balsham, Hugh of (d. 1286), bishop of Ely and benefactor, took his name from Balsham, Cambridgeshire, one of Ely Priory's manors. Nothing is known of his background, except that during the controversy aroused by his election as bishop it was alleged that he was of servile origins. He became a monk at ...

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Bateman [Norwich], William (c. 1298–1355), diplomat, founder of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and bishop of Norwich, was probably born in Norwich (from which he was sometimes named), the third son of William and Margery Bateman. His father was many times bailiff of the city, and in 1326–7 its member of ...

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Bell, William (1731–1816), Church of England clergyman and benefactor, was born in Greenwich, the son of William Bell. He was educated at Greenwich School, and admitted pensioner at Magdalene College, Cambridge, on 26 May 1749. He graduated BA, as eighth wrangler, in 1753, the year in which he was elected fellow of ...

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Bingham [Byngham], William (d. 1451), ecclesiastic and founder of Christ's College, Cambridge, may have been the William Byngham who was presented to the vicarages of Hutton, near Beverley, Yorkshire, and Alverstoke, Hampshire, by Henry IV in 1401–2. More probably, the future founder of ...

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James Blair (1655/66–1743) by Charles Bridges Muscarelle Museum of Art, College of William and Mary

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Blair, James (1655/6–1743), Church of England clergyman and founder of the College of William and Mary, was the son of Peter Blair (d. 1673), Church of Scotland minister of St Cuthbert's parish, Edinburgh, and his wife, Mary Hamilton (d. in or after 1696)...

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Sara Louisa Blomfield (1859–1939) by unknown photographer The Bahá'í Publishing Trust

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Blomfield [née Ryan], Sara Louisa [Sitárih Khánum] (1859–1939), Bahء‎i promoter and philanthropist, was born in Knockaneven, near Limerick, the daughter of Matthew John Ryan. She received a convent education in England. On 21 April 1887 she married Arthur William Blomfield (1829–1899)...

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Brown, Dame Edith Mary (1864–1956), medical missionary and founder of the North India School of Medicine for Christian Women, was born on 24 March 1864 at Bank Buildings, 10A Coats Lane, Whitehaven, Cumberland. One of six children, she was the second of three daughters born to ...

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Willielma Campbell, Viscountess Glenorchy (1741–1786) by Robert Scott, pubd 1804 © National Portrait Gallery, London

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Campbell [née Maxwell], Willielma, Viscountess Glenorchy (1741–1786), evangelical activist and benefactor, was the younger daughter of prosperous parents, William Maxwell (d. 1741), medical practitioner of Kirkcudbright, and his wife, Elizabeth Hairstanes (d. c.1806) of Craig. Willielma was born on 2 September 1741 after her father's death. The only other child of the marriage was her sister, ...

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Canynges, William (1402–1474), merchant and ecclesiastical benefactor, was one of the younger of seven children of John Canynges, clothier and merchant of Bristol, and his wife, Joan Wotton. He was born into a notably successful Bristol family. William Canynges (d. 1396) was a wealthy clothier who was five times mayor of ...

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Chaloner, Robert (1547/8–1621), Church of England clergyman and educational benefactor, was born in Goldsborough, near Knaresborough, West Riding of Yorkshire, the second son of Robert and Ann Chaloner of Llanfyllin (possibly Llanfyllin, Montgomeryshire). He was elected to a studentship at Christ Church, Oxford...

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Clarke, Alured (1696–1742), Church of England clergyman and benefactor, was the son of Alured Clarke (1658/9–1744), gentleman, of Godmanchester, Huntingdonshire, and his second wife, Ann (1667/8–1755), fourth daughter of Charles Trimnell (1630–1702) [see under Trimnell, Charles], rector of Abbots Ripton, in ...

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Philip Thomas Byard Clayton (1885–1972) by Howard Coster, 1937 © National Portrait Gallery, London

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Clayton, Philip Thomas Byard [Tubby] (1885–1972), Church of England clergyman and founder of the Toc H movement, was born on 12 December 1885 at Maryborough, Queensland, Australia, the third son and sixth and youngest child of Reginald Byard Buchanan Clayton, manager of a sugar plantation, and his wife, who was also his first cousin, ...