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Buckingham, Thomas (d. 1349), schoolman, probably came from Buckinghamshire. He is first recorded in 1324 as a fellow of Merton College, Oxford, a college which emphasized theology, and where he completed his studies for a master's degree c.1330, after which he began work on a doctorate. By 1338 he was commenting on the ...

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Burley, Adam (d. 1327/8), schoolman, was of unknown origins, though he may have been related to his older contemporary, the schoolman Walter Burley (d. 1345)—both, for instance, occupied positions vacated by James Berkeley, bishop of Exeter, and were granted these benefices by papal provision on the same day. ...

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Étampes, Theobald d' (c. 1060–c. 1125), teacher and theologian, took his name from Étampes in the Île-de-France, where he was born. He spent his youth at Caen, in the abbey of St Étienne, where he would have known Lanfranc (d. 1089)...

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John the Canon [Juan Marbres] (fl. 15th cent.), schoolman, is a historical riddle. His citations of positions held by Francesco da Marchia, Thomas the Englishman, Gerard Odon, and Pierre Aureole, and especially his close doctrinal attachment to John Duns Scotus, have enticed many historians, particularly ...

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Renham, Henry de (fl. c. 1290), schoolman, is known only for having transcribed and glossed the corpus vetustius of Aristotle's works on natural philosophy, in a volume presented to Rochester Cathedral priory by Prior John de Renham, who died in 1294. It is possible that both ...

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Tournai, Simon de (c. 1130?–1201?), schoolman and theologian, undoubtedly took his name from Tournai in what is now Belgium. However, although Matthew Paris styles him 'a Frenchman by birth named Simon, taking his cognomen from Tournai' (Paris, Chron., 2.476...

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Vinsauf, Geoffrey of [called Galfridus Anglicus] (fl. 1208–1213), poet and teacher of grammar and rhetoric, also called Anglicus, is best-known as the author of the Poetria nova ('The new poetics'), the single most successful textbook on rhetorical composition written during the middle ages. It is not known what his name means. What little is known about his life comes chiefly from the ...

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Wakefield, John of (fl. 1294/5), schoolman and medical writer, was presumably a Yorkshireman, but is recorded with certainty only at Oxford. He may have been the John de Wakerfeld who with other northern clerks was involved in a brawl with clerks from the Welsh marches on 29 April 1285. But he can be identified with greater conviction as the ...

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Wilton, Thomas (fl. 1288–1322), schoolman, was a notable commentator on Aristotle at Oxford and Paris. First recorded as a fellow of Merton College, Oxford, in 1288/9, he was still there in 1300/01. During this time he was promoted to master of arts and served as dean from 1297 to 1299. In the meantime he was ordained subdeacon in 1296 and deacon in 1297, both to the title of a fellowship, while in 1303 he was presented by his college to the rectory of ...