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Alnwick, Martin (d. 1336), Franciscan friar, theologian, and philosopher, doubtless came from Northumberland. Possibly the Martinus occasionally recorded as participating in Oxford disputations in the last years of the thirteenth century, he was certainly at Oxford by 1300, when he was among the friars presented to the bishop of ...

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Barton [Berton], William (d. after 1382), theologian and university principal, originated in the diocese of Canterbury, and must have read the arts course at Oxford in the early 1350s. First recorded in 1356 as a fellow of Merton College, he vacated his fellowship in 1361, although he acted as a feoffee for the college as late as 1380. He was bachelor of theology by 1376 and doctor by 1380. He was admitted rector of ...

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Bate, John (d. 1430), logician and theologian, was, according to Leland, born west of the Severn (perhaps in the Welsh marches), but educated at the Carmelite convent in York. As a Carmelite friar he was a member of the London convent when he was ordained deacon by ...

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Bede [St Bede, Bæda, known as the Venerable Bede] (673/4–735), monk, historian, and theologian, in his Historia ecclesiastica (731) outlines his own life. Born in northern Northumbria, his relations put him in the monastery of Wearmouth at the age of seven. He transferred to the nearby sister house of ...

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Betson, Thomas (d. 1516), librarian, religious author, and compiler, is first recorded at Cambridge University, where he had studied civil law for two and a half years, canon law for two years, and practised for four years, when he was granted a grace in 1466–7 to proceed to the degree of BCnL. He was rector of ...

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Billingham [Bullingham], Richard (fl. c. 1344–c. 1361), logician and theologian, was associated with Merton College, Oxford, as a fellow from c.1344 until c.1361. He held many offices at the college, was sub-warden for several years and is said to have presented to the college library tables on logic and philosophy that he had probably compiled himself; this material does not appear to have survived. He obtained from the university the degrees of MA and BTh. In March 1349, following the election of ...

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Bloxham, John [Geffrei] (c. 1340–1387), theologian and college head, evidently came from Bloxham, Oxfordshire. He was elected fellow of Merton in 1361, and spent his whole life thereafter at the college, as bursar in 1365–7, and as warden from 16 October 1375 until his death. He studied theology as a fellow, and having completed all the requirements for the doctorate by October 1375 qualified as an inceptor in theology; but, presumably omitting to perform his necessary lectures as a regent master, he did not graduate as a doctor. He benefited from the ecclesiastical patronage of his college, becoming vicar of ...

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Bradshaw, Henry (d. 1513), scholar and hagiographer, was a Benedictine monk of the abbey of St Werburgh, Chester. He was probably professed in the mid-1490s since he was ordained subdeacon in 1499 and deacon and priest the following year. Although there is no evidence to corroborate ...

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Brinkley, Richard (fl. 1355–1375), Franciscan friar, theologian, and philosopher, was for a long time mistakenly referred to as Walter Brinkley. Nothing is known of his early life, except that he joined his order in Oxford. Brinkley's philosophical and theological ideas circulated at the ...

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Capgrave, John (1393–1464), prior of Bishop's Lynn, theologian, and historian, was born on 21 April 1393. Nothing is known of his family, unless an older John Capgrave, who took the degree of doctor of theology at Oxford in 1390, and was also an Augustinian friar, was his uncle. Some early biographers, notably ...

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Cawston [Causton], Michael (d. 1396), theologian and university principal, came from Norwich diocese (the village of Cawston is north-east of Norwich). His date of birth is unknown, but by 1354 he was a master of arts and in 1361 took his doctorate in theology at ...

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Chatton [Catton], Walter (d. 1343/4), Franciscan friar, philosopher, and theologian, probably derived his name from Catton in Northumberland, a few miles south-west of Hexham. He entered the Franciscan order as a ‘boy’, that is, under the age of fourteen, and since he was ordained subdeacon in 1307 by ...

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Cranston, David (c. 1480–1512), philosopher and theologian, was born in Scotland, probably in the diocese of Glasgow. Nothing is known of his parentage or of his education before he matriculated at the University of Paris in 1495. His bursa at the Collège de Montaigu...

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Durham, William of (d. 1249), theologian and university benefactor, may have been born at Sedgefield, co. Durham. Nothing otherwise is known of his origins or early life, until he is recorded as a regent master in theology at Paris, at a date between 1220 and 1223. To ...

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Étampes, Theobald d' (c. 1060–c. 1125), teacher and theologian, took his name from Étampes in the Île-de-France, where he was born. He spent his youth at Caen, in the abbey of St Étienne, where he would have known Lanfranc (d. 1089)...

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Faversham, Simon of (d. 1306), philosopher and theologian, was presumably born at Faversham in Kent, either in the 1240s or, less likely, in the 1260s. He appears to have trained as a theologian at Oxford, though this is not established with certainty. The Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, Vienna, MS 2302, fol. 23...

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Flete, John (c. 1398–1466), prior and historian of Westminster Abbey, said his first mass in 1422–3, two years after entering the monastery, and was probably about twenty-four, the canonical age for ordination to the priesthood, at the time. The name may be a toponym adopted on entry into the monastery, or his family name; if the latter, membership of one of the ...

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Gascoigne [Gascoygne], Thomas (1404–1458), theologian and university administrator, was the only son of Richard Gascoigne (d. 1422) and Beatrix, his wife. He was born on 5 January 1404 at Hunslet, near Leeds, where his father owned the manor. He had two sisters of whom the elder, ...

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Kilvington [Kylmington], Richard (c. 1305–1361), philosopher and theologian, was the son of a priest from the diocese of York, and was probably born in Kilvington in Yorkshire. He studied and taught at Oxford and must have matriculated no later than 1319. MA by 26 September 1331, when he was included in a list of ...

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Lavenham [Lavyngham], Richard (fl. 1399–c. 1403), prior of the Carmelite convent, London, philosopher, and theologian, presumably came from the town of Lavenham, in Suffolk—John Leland and other early biographers report that he came from that region. He entered his order at ...