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Crewdson, Isaac (1780–1844), Quaker seceder, was the elder son of Thomas Crewdson and Cicely (née Dillworth) of Kendal, Westmorland. He was born there on 6 June 1780, and at fourteen settled at Ardwick, Manchester, where he became a successful textile manufacturer. On 27 July 1803 he married ...

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Dewsbury, William (c. 1621–1688), Quaker activist, was born and raised in Allerthorpe, in the East Riding of Yorkshire. Of his father and mother nothing is known, beyond the speculation by Smith that William's father died when he was eight years old. Dewsbury's upbringing, working life, and religious experiences are discussed in his ...

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Eccles, Solomon (1617?–1682), musician and Quaker missionary, was probably baptized on 14 September 1617 at Hatfield, Hertfordshire, the son of Solomon Eccles. His father was a musician, but little else is known of Eccles's early life. He appears to have lived at ...

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Evans [née Canual or Canval], Katharine (c. 1618–1692), Quaker missionary, declared to the Maltese inquisition in 1658 that she was the daughter of Anne and Roger ‘Canual’ and that she was then aged about forty; this was an Italian rendering of her maiden name, which may have been ...

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Howard, Luke (1621–1699), Quaker activist and writer, was born at Dover on 18 October 1621, the son of Robert Howard (c.1580–1625), a shoemaker, and his wife, Susanna. His mother married a butcher when Luke was eight, but when he came to decide on his future occupation 'something in my Conscience … stirred against Evil, and made me dislike a Butcher's Life and Trade' (...

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Howgill, Francis (1618?–1669), Quaker activist, was born probably in 1618, in the small village of Todthorne, near Grayrigg, Westmorland. His father was possibly a yeoman, though nothing else of his parentage is known. One near-contemporary record of Quaker preaching, though, does seem to indicate that ...

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Mead, William (c. 1627–1713), Quaker patron and merchant, lived in London, where he became a prosperous linen draper and merchant; he was also a member of the Company of Merchant Taylors. He served as captain of a trained band and was a Seeker in religion, joining the presbyterians and Independents among others before finally becoming a Quaker early in 1670. Later that year, on 14 August, he was present at a large and crowded meeting in ...