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Abadam, Alice (1856–1940), suffrage activist and women’s right’s campaigner, was born in St John’s Wood, London, on 2 January 1856 (census returns 1891, 1939 Register). Her birth was not registered and she was not baptised. She was the youngest of seven children (four daughters and two sons) of ...

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J. H. Round

revised by Emma Mason

Abetot, Urse d' (c. 1040–1108), administrator, derived his name from St Jean d'Abbetot, near Tancarville (Seine Inférieure) where he was probably born. He appears in Domesday Book as a tenant-in-chief in the counties of Hereford, Gloucester, Warwick, and Worcester, and as a subtenant in ...

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Abingdon [Abyndon], Richard (d. in or before 1322), administrator, was probably a native of Abingdon in Berkshire, and possibly a relation both of Stephen Abingdon, who became butler of the royal household under Edward II, and of the Stephen Abingdon who was a ...

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Ælfgar, earl of Mercia (d. 1062?), magnate, was the son of Leofric, earl of Mercia, and Godgifu (Godiva). He married, perhaps in the late 1020s, Ælfgifu, probably a kinswoman of Cnut's first wife, Ælfgifu of Northampton. Her known lands lay in the east midlands and ...

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See Ælfhere

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Ann Williams

Ælfhere (d. 983), magnate, was the son of Ealhhelm, ealdorman of central Mercia (what is now Worcestershire and Gloucestershire) from 940 to 951. Ælfhere and his brothers are greeted as kinsmen by successive kings, though the degree of relationship is unknown. They were particularly close to ...

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See Ælfhere

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Ann Williams

Ælfric (d. 1016), magnate, must be distinguished from his contemporary Ælfric Cild [see under Ælfhere (d. 983)], who was ealdorman of Mercia from 983 to 985. In 982 he succeeded Ealdorman Æthelmær (977–82) in a command which included Hampshire (AS chart....

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Æthelstan [Ethelstan, Æthelstan Half-King] (fl. 932–956), magnate, was the second of four sons of Ealdorman Æthelfrith, who ruled the southern and eastern territories of Mercia. Æthelfrith was descended from the West Saxon royal family and held extensive estates in Somerset and Devon. His wife, ...

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Æthelweard [Ethelwerd] (d. 998?), chronicler and magnate, was ealdorman of south-western England. He styled himself 'Patricius Consul Fabius Quaestor', a latinization of 'Æthel-/ealdorman/Fabius/-weard'. He was the father of Æthelmær, grandfather of one Æthelweard and grandfather-in-law of another: all also ealdormen, and two of the same south-western ealdormanry as ...

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Æthelwine [Ethelwine, Æthelwine Dei Amicus] (d. 992), magnate and founder of Ramsey Abbey, Huntingdonshire, was the fourth and youngest son of Æthelstan, known as the Half-King (932–956), and his wife, Ælfwyn (d. 986). He was a few years older than the atheling ...

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Aigle, Richer de l' (c. 1095–1176), baron, the eldest son of Gilbert de l'Aigle and Juliana, daughter of Geoffroi, count of Mortagne, was a member of a family with a tradition of service to the Norman dukes. His great-grandfather, Engenulf, had been killed at ...

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Peter d' Aigueblanche (d. 1268) tomb effigy by permission of the Dean and Chapter of Hereford Cathedral

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Aigueblanche, Peter d' [Peter de Aqua Blanca] (d. 1268), bishop of Hereford and royal councillor, was descended from the family of Briançon, holders of the lordship of Aigueblanche (Savoie) in the Tarentaise or valley of the upper Isère, dependants of the counts of Savoy...

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Aiken, Francis Thomas [Frank] (1898–1983), Irish revolutionary and politician, was born on 13 February 1898 at Carrickbracken, Camlough, co. Armagh, into a well-to-do farming family. He was the son of a James Aiken and his wife, Mary McGeeney. As well as being a farmer, his father was also a builder, responsible for many churches in ...

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Airmyn [Ayreminne], Richard (c. 1290–1340), administrator, came of a family that derived its name from the village of Airmyn on the River Aire in Yorkshire. Richard seems to have been a son of Adam and Matilda Airmyn and a younger brother of William Airmyn (d. 1336)...

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Airmyn [Ayreminne], William (d. 1336), administrator and bishop of Norwich, was the son of Adam and Matilda Airmyn, and probably came from the hamlet of Airmyn, near Selby, in Yorkshire, one of a large group of men from that region to obtain prominence in government service. First recorded as an attorney in ...

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Aiscough [Ayscough], William (c. 1395–1450), administrator and bishop of Salisbury, was the son of Robert Aiscough, of Potgrange, near Masham, Yorkshire, and brother of Robert, who became dean of the Chapel Royal. Ordained in 1415, he was master of arts by 1423 and doctor of theology by 1432, both probably of ...

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K. S. B. Keats-Rohan

Alan Rufus (d. 1093), magnate, was the second of at least seven legitimate sons of Count Eudo, regent of Brittany from 1040 to 1047, and Orguen, or Agnes, his Angevin wife. Alan was called Rufus (‘the Red’) to distinguish him from a younger brother, ...

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See Stewart family