1-11 of 11 results  for:

  • composition x
  • Christianity x
  • established church x
Clear all

Article

Aston, Hugh (d. 1558), composer and choirmaster, is of obscure origins. He became one of the foremost church musicians of his generation, the peer of John Taverner, and yet biographers have sometimes confused him with namesakes. He is not Hugh Aston, canon of ...

Article

Chelle, William (fl. 1524–1559), Church of England clergyman and musician, was born probably in the diocese of Worcester; he may be the William Chell who, a secular, was ordained acolyte on 21 May 1513 and subdeacon on 7 March 1516. Now a priest, he supplicated for the degree of BMus at ...

Article

Cowper [Cooper], Robert (c. 1465–1539/40), composer, was apparently brought up in Sussex, but of his parentage and musical training nothing is known. From early 1493 until October 1496 he served as a lay clerk in the choir of King's College, Cambridge, and he was admitted by the university to the degree of bachelor of music on 13 June 1494. During 1501–2 he was licensed to proceed as doctor of music on the grounds that five years of study and five years of practical experience so qualified him, and he was eventually admitted during 1506–7. Described as 'of ...

Article

Johnson, Robert (d. after 1549), priest and composer, was born in Duns, Berwickshire. According to an annotation in the partbooks that Thomas Wode, vicar of St Andrews, copied (c.1562–92), Johnson fled to England after being ‘deletit’, that is, delated, or summoned before an ecclesiastical court, on charges of heresy. During the reign of ...

Article

Ludford, Nicholas (c. 1490–1557), composer, whose early musical training is unknown, may have originated from London. In 1495 the composer John Ludforde, perhaps his father, joined the fraternity of St Nicholas, the London Guild of Parish Clerks; Nicholas Ludford himself joined in 1521. The composer occupied the majority of his adult working life employed at the royal collegiate chapel of ...

Article

Philip ap Rhys [Philipp Ryse] (fl. 1547–1559), organist and composer, was apparently of Welsh descent, although all available biographical information refers to London. According to the churchwardens' accounts of St Mary-at-Hill, near Billingsgate in the city of London, 'Philipp Ryse, organ player' received wages of ...

Article

Pygott, Richard (d. 1549), composer and church musician, is of unknown parentage and background. He spent more than thirty years in two of the foremost choral foundations of early Tudor England, first as master of Cardinal Wolsey's household chapel choir and later as a gentleman of ...

Article

Redford, John (c. 1500–1547), composer, is of unknown parentage and date of birth. Since many of his musical and literary associates, as well as his brother Henry, lived well into the later sixteenth century, however, it may be conjectured that he was born about 1500. He was one of the earliest English composers of organ music, and also a writer of plays and poems. In 1534 he signed, as one of the six vicars-choral of ...

Article

Sheppard, John (d. 1559?), composer, is of unknown parentage, family, education, and upbringing. At Michaelmas 1543 he was informator choristarum at Magdalen College, Oxford, in succession to Thomas Preston, and he remained in office there until some time between Michaelmas (29 September) and Christmas 1547. Although master of the choristers, he was not also organist; nor was he a fellow of the college, nor did he kidnap or imprison choirboys as some modern accounts have held. The college accounts for 1546–7 show a payment of ...

Article

Taverner, John (c. 1490–1545), composer, is of unknown parentage. He was probably a native of Lincolnshire. In 1525/6 2s. 4d. sufficed to hire a man to escort him from Boston to visit his 'country', indicating family settlement in south Lincolnshire within one or two days' ride of ...

Article

Wilder, Philip van (d. 1554), musician, was born probably in the Low Countries at the close of the fifteenth century. During the second quarter of the sixteenth century he oversaw secular music-making at the English court; in particular his position brought him close to ...