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Abel, John (1578/9–1675), master carpenter, was probably born and lived at Sarnesfield, Herefordshire. A Catholic recusant, he was brought before a church court in 1618 for contracting a secret marriage with his wife, Johanna. She was still alive in 1640, when she appeared in a list of recusants with her husband. Few other facts are known about ...

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Adam, George (fl. 1826–1828), journeyman carpenter and trade unionist, is a figure about whose personal life nothing is known. He became one of the leaders of a group of radical artisan trade unionists in London who campaigned for political reform, workers' education, and legislation in the interests of labour over strikes, wages, machinery, and free trade. The chief episode which brought them together was the agitation led by ...

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Atkinson, Thomas (bap. 1729, d. 1798), architect and mason, was baptized on 22 June 1729 at Holy Trinity Church, King's Court, York, the son of Thomas Atkinson (d. 1765), a mason, and his wife, Jane Marshall. He worked with his father on ...

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Baldwin, Thomas (c. 1750–1820), architect and property developer, of unknown parentage, was mainly active in Bath, although not born there. He married Elizabeth, daughter of John Chapman, alderman of the city, on 15 September 1779, at St James's Church. They had at least one daughter and one son. He began his career as clerk to the Palladian local architect ...

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Barnsley family (per. 1885–1987), architects, designers, and craftspeople, came to prominence with (Arthur) Ernest Barnsley (1863–1926), architect and designer, and Sidney Howard Barnsley (1865–1926), architect and furniture maker. Ernest Barnsley was born on 17 February 1863, the sixth child of ...

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Brown, Richard (1736–1816), stonemason and manufacturer of decorative stone, was born in Derby and baptized at the collegiate church of All Saints on 25 July 1736, son of Richard Browne [Richard [i] Brown] (1700–1756), mason, and his second wife, Ann, née...

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See Brown, Richard

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W. E. A. Axon

Reviser Sarah Couper

Castillo, John (1792–1845), stonemason, poet, and preacher, was born at Rathfarnham, near Dublin. When he was two or three years old his parents, who were Roman Catholics, emigrated to England, and on the voyage were shipwrecked off the Isle of Man. They settled in the hamlet of ...

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Cure family (per. c. 1540–c. 1620), masons and sculptors, worked in London. William Cure the elder (1514/15–1579) was born in Holland and was brought over to England in 1541 or 1542 to work on Nonsuch Palace for Henry VIII. He became an English citizen in 1552, married an Englishwoman, ...

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Ernest William Gimson (1864–1919) by unknown photographer, c. 1900–10 Cheltenham Art Gallery and Museum

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Gimson, Ernest William (1864–1919), craftsman and architect, was born in Leicester on 21 December 1864, the fourth child and second son in the family of three sons and four daughters of Josiah Gimson (1818–1883), iron-founder, engineer, and industrial entrepreneur, who established the Vulcan works...

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Griggs, John (1551/2–1598), carpenter, was the son of Simon Griggs, citizen and butcher of London, and his wife, Elizabeth, who lived in Pudding Lane in the parish of St Margaret, New Fish Street. Simon Griggs died in 1570, leaving the lease on his house to his wife and the rest of his goods to his wife and children. On 1 November 1573 ...

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Grumbold, Robert (bap. 1639, d. 1720), mason and architect, was baptized in June 1639 at Raunds, Northamptonshire, the son of Edward and Mary Grumbold, and was a member of a family of masons originating at the quarry villages of Raunds and Weldon which was active in the ...

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Harrison, Stephen (fl. 1604–1605), joiner and architect, was living at the sign of the Snayle, Lime Street, London, in 1604. In that year he published a slim folio volume of his designs for the seven Arches of Triumph erected for James I's passage through ...

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Herland, Hugh (d. 1406?), master carpenter, was the presumed son of William Herland (d. 1375), master carpenter to Edward III. William first appears c.1332 as a sawyer of moulds at St Stephen's Chapel, Westminster, where William Hurley was master carpenter. He was also employed at the ...

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Holt, Thomas (1577/8–1624), carpenter, was born in Yorkshire. He was one of the group of northern craftsmen, including the Halifax masons John Akroyd and John Bentley, who were invited to Oxford by Sir Henry Savile, warden of Merton College, at a time when the university was in dispute with the city building crafts, and who undertook some of the most prestigious projects of the first two decades of the seventeenth century. Despite the assumption that he came from ...

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Hurley, William (d. 1354), master carpenter, is first recorded c.1315 in the exchequer plea rolls, among a list of London craftsmen acting as 'sureties' on behalf of imprisoned masons employed at the king's manor of Eltham, Kent. Although no works can be associated with ...

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James, John (c. 1672–1746), architect, surveyor, and carpenter, was the eldest son of the Revd John James (c.1645–1733). It is clear from his memorial tablet in St Mary's Church, Eversley, Hampshire, that his parents were not Thomas and Elinor James, as was once thought. ...

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Jelfe, Andrews (c. 1690–1759), masonry contractor and architect, was one of at least two sons of William Jelfe (c.1660–1721), a carpenter, of South Weald, Essex, and his wife, Mary, née Andrews (c.1668–1748). On 2 August 1704 he was apprenticed to ...

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Jerman, Edward (c. 1605–1668), carpenter and architect, was the eldest of the three sons of Anthony Jerman (d. 1650), master of the Carpenters' Company in 1633–4, and his wife, Mary Bennett. He belonged to at least the third generation of a family prominent as carpenters in the ...