You are looking at  1-20 of 25 articles  for:

  • Education and scholarship x
  • Hebraist or Semitic scholar x
Clear All

Article

Abendana, Isaac (d. 1699), Hebraist and book collector, was born in Spain and was taken at an early age to Hamburg, Germany. By 1660 he had completed rabbinical studies and by his own account sought the 'wisdom of medicine' (Katz, The Abendana brothers, 36...

Article

Abramsky, Yehezkel (1886–1976), rabbinic scholar and Orthodox Jewish leader, was born on or about 7 February 1886 in Dashkovtsy, near Most and Grodno, Lithuania, the third child and eldest son of Mordecai Zalman Abramsky, a local timber merchant, and his wife, Freydel Goldin...

Article

Aguilar, Grace (1816–1847), writer on Jewish history and religion and novelist, was born on 2 June 1816 in Hackney, Middlesex, the eldest of the three children of Emanuel Aguilar (1787–1845), merchant, and his wife, Sarah (d. 1854), daughter of Jacob Dias Fernandez...

Article

Benisch, Abraham (1811–1878), Hebraist and newspaper editor, was born to Jewish parents at Drossau, a small town 8 miles south-west of Klattau in Bohemia. About 1836 he studied surgery at Prague University where, with other Jewish students, he formed an organization for re-establishing Jewish independence in ...

Article

Benmohel, Nathan Lazarus (1803–1869), Hebrew and German scholar, was born in Hamburg, Germany, son of Rabbi Elieza Lazi (1741–1841), presiding judge, or dayan, of Posen, and the united congregations of Altona, Hamburg, and Wandsbeck. His mother was the daughter of Rabbi Todros Munk...

Article

Deutsch, Emanuel Oscar Menahem (1829–1873), Semitic scholar and orientalist, was born of Jewish parents in Neisse in Prussian Silesia on 28 October 1829, and at the age of six entered the local Gymnasium. Two years later he was sent to study with his uncle, ...

Article

Ferdinand, Philip (1556–1599), Hebrew and Arabic scholar, was born of Jewish parentage in Poland in 1556. In his youth he studied the Talmud in the traditional Jewish manner and, judging from his elegant Latin, his command of Greek, and his fine handwriting, also received a humanist education. After about 1580 he was in ...

Article

Glück, Louis [pseud. Louis Glück Rosenthal] (1804–1874), artist and Hebrew scholar, was born in Posen in Prussia. His father, Pielte Elimelech Glück (d. c.1840), a furrier, was a prominent (hakham) member of the Jewish community. Nothing is known of ...

Article

Gollancz, Sir Hermann (1852–1930), rabbi and Semitic scholar, was born at Bremen on 30 November 1852, the eldest son of Rabbi Samuel Marcus Gollancz, minister of the Hambro Synagogue, then in Leadenhall Street, London, and his wife, Johanna Koppell. He had three sisters and three brothers, his youngest brother being ...

Article

Gordon Goodwin

Reviser Gerald Law

Hershon, Paul Isaac (1817–1888), Hebrew scholar, was born of Jewish parents in Galicia but converted to Christianity at an early age. As a protestant missionary he became an active member of the London Society for Promoting Christianity among the Jews in England and the ...

Article

Kalisch, Marcus Moritz (1825–1885), Hebraist and biblical commentator, was born of Jewish parents at Treptow, Pomerania, on 16 May 1825. He was educated in Berlin, first at the Gymnasium of the Grauer Kloster, then at the University of Berlin, where he studied classical philology and Semitic languages, and finally at the rabbinical seminary. In 1848 he gained doctorates at the universities of ...

Article

Levi, David (1742–1801), writer on Judaism, was born in London to poor immigrant parents who could not afford to educate him. With the distant help of his grandfather in Poland he learned Hebrew while working as a shoemaker, later as a hatter, and still later as a printer. He read voraciously in Jewish literature from ancient times to the present, as well as in Christian writings about Judaism and about the ...

Article

Loewe, Raphael James (1919–2011), Hebrew scholar, translator, and poet, was born on 16 April 1919 in Calcutta, India, the elder of two surviving sons of Herbert Martin James Loewe (1882–1940), Hebrew scholar, and his wife, Ethel Victoria, née Hyamson (1887–1946). His younger brother, ...

Article

Löwy, Albert [formerly Abraham] (1816–1908), Hebrew scholar, born on 8 December 1816 at Aussee in Moravia, was the eldest son of thirteen children (seven sons and six daughters) of Leopold Löwy and his wife, Katty. Löwy was called after Rabbi Abraham Leipnik...

Article

Thompson Cooper

Reviser Philip Carter

Lyons, Israel, the elder (d. 1770), Hebrew scholar and teacher, was born into a Polish Jewish family. He settled at Cambridge where he resided for nearly forty years, earning his livelihood by keeping a silversmith's shop, and giving instruction in the Hebrew language to members of the university. The ...

Image

Moses Margoliouth (1815–1881) by John William Cook, pubd 1850 [with the marble head of Empress Theodora, discovered among the ruins of Carthage] © National Portrait Gallery, London

Article

Margoliouth, Moses (1815–1881), Hebrew scholar and convert from Judaism, was born in Suwałki, Poland, son of a prosperous local merchant named Gershon Margoliouth (d. c.1852), apparently originally surnamed Epstein or Epszteyn. In 1834 Moses Margoliouth married Chaja Goldberg (1818–1870), daughter of writer and historian ...

Article

Marks, David Woolf (1811–1909), rabbi and Hebrew scholar, was born in London on 22 November 1811, the eldest son of Woolf Marks, merchant, and his wife, Mary. His early education was at the Jews' Free School in Bell Lane, Spitalfields, and when just thirteen years old he was placed in charge of the management of the school for three months during the absence of the master through illness. He then spent five years as a pupil teacher at ...

Article

S. R. Driver

Reviser Sinéad Agnew

Neubauer, Adolf (1832–1907), Hebrew scholar, was born at Bitsche, Kottesó, Trentsen, in northern Hungary, on 7 March 1832, the son of Jacob Neubauer, a Jewish merchant and Talmudic scholar, and his wife, Amalie, née Langfelder. Intended by his father to become a rabbi, ...

Article

Raphael, Marco (fl. 1529–1534), Hebraist, was a Jewish convert to Christianity from Venice, where he was rewarded by the council of ten for inventing an improved brand of invisible ink. In 1529 he was recruited to the cause of Henry VIII's divorce by another Venetian, ...