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Abel, John (1578/9–1675), master carpenter, was probably born and lived at Sarnesfield, Herefordshire. A Catholic recusant, he was brought before a church court in 1618 for contracting a secret marriage with his wife, Johanna. She was still alive in 1640, when she appeared in a list of recusants with her husband. Few other facts are known about ...

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Adam, George (fl. 1826–1828), journeyman carpenter and trade unionist, is a figure about whose personal life nothing is known. He became one of the leaders of a group of radical artisan trade unionists in London who campaigned for political reform, workers' education, and legislation in the interests of labour over strikes, wages, machinery, and free trade. The chief episode which brought them together was the agitation led by ...

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Griggs, John (1551/2–1598), carpenter, was the son of Simon Griggs, citizen and butcher of London, and his wife, Elizabeth, who lived in Pudding Lane in the parish of St Margaret, New Fish Street. Simon Griggs died in 1570, leaving the lease on his house to his wife and the rest of his goods to his wife and children. On 1 November 1573 ...

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Herland, Hugh (d. 1406?), master carpenter, was the presumed son of William Herland (d. 1375), master carpenter to Edward III. William first appears c.1332 as a sawyer of moulds at St Stephen's Chapel, Westminster, where William Hurley was master carpenter. He was also employed at the ...

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Holt, Thomas (1577/8–1624), carpenter, was born in Yorkshire. He was one of the group of northern craftsmen, including the Halifax masons John Akroyd and John Bentley, who were invited to Oxford by Sir Henry Savile, warden of Merton College, at a time when the university was in dispute with the city building crafts, and who undertook some of the most prestigious projects of the first two decades of the seventeenth century. Despite the assumption that he came from ...

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Hurley, William (d. 1354), master carpenter, is first recorded c.1315 in the exchequer plea rolls, among a list of London craftsmen acting as 'sureties' on behalf of imprisoned masons employed at the king's manor of Eltham, Kent. Although no works can be associated with ...

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James, John (c. 1672–1746), architect, surveyor, and carpenter, was the eldest son of the Revd John James (c.1645–1733). It is clear from his memorial tablet in St Mary's Church, Eversley, Hampshire, that his parents were not Thomas and Elinor James, as was once thought. ...

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Jerman, Edward (c. 1605–1668), carpenter and architect, was the eldest of the three sons of Anthony Jerman (d. 1650), master of the Carpenters' Company in 1633–4, and his wife, Mary Bennett. He belonged to at least the third generation of a family prominent as carpenters in the ...

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Owen, Nicholas [St Nicholas Owen, called Little John, Little Michael] (d. 1606), carpenter and Jesuit lay brother, was born in Oxford, probably in St Peter le Bailey. On 2 February he was apprenticed for eight years to William Conway, an Oxford joiner. He sometimes used the aliases ...

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Pardon, Walter William (1914–1996), carpenter and folk-singer, was born on 4 March 1914 at Hall Lane, Knapton, Norfolk, the only child of Thomas Pardon (1877–1957), farmworker, and his wife, Emily, née Gee (1874–1953). He was educated at the local elementary school. After an apprenticeship, begun at the age of fourteen, in the neighbouring village of ...

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Payne, William (1717/18–1782), carpenter and constable, was probably born in London; details of his parents and background are unknown. He is now best remembered for his activities from the late 1750s in policing London streets and as an agitator against the capital's Roman Catholic community, but he worked first as a carpenter. He was apprenticed to a master in ...

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Phillips, John (1708/9–1775), carpenter and builder, was one of at least two sons of Matthew Phillips of East Hagbourne, Berkshire, and his wife, Elizabeth. His grandfather, another Matthew Phillips, was a builder, and his uncle, Thomas Phillips (c. 1689–1736), son of ...

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Smith [later Smith Grant] family (per. 1824–1975), distillers and farmers, owned at Glenlivet one of the best-known and most respected malt whisky distilleries in the north-east of Scotland. The earliest records of the family, originally known in English-language documents as Gow (from the Gaelic ...

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Smith, Robert (1722–1777), carpenter and architect, was born at Lugton, a hamlet 8 miles south-west of Edinburgh, on 14 January 1722, the son of John Smith, a baxter (or baker), and Martha, née Lawrie. His parents were poor tenants of the wealthy and powerful ...

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Steer, Bartholomew (bap. 1568, d. 1597?), carpenter and rebel, was baptized on 25 July 1568 at Hampton Poyle, Oxfordshire, the son of John Steer (d. 1616) and his wife, Mary (d. 1579). Little is known of Steer's life before his plotting as ringleader of the abortive ...

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Timbrell, Benjamin (c. 1683–1754), carpenter and builder, was one of the most noted master builders working in London in the first half of the eighteenth century. He may have been the son of Benjamin and Elizabeth Timbrell, who were living in Westminster in the mid-1680s, but his date and place of birth have not been traced. On 21 December 1707, when he was about twenty-four years old and living in the parish of ...