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Backhouse, Sir Edmund Trelawny, second baronet (1873–1944), Sinologist and fraudster, eldest of the four surviving sons of Jonathan Edmund Backhouse, first baronet (1849–1918), a banker, and Florence (1845–1902), youngest daughter of Sir John Salusbury Salusbury-Trelawny, was born on 20 October 1873 at The Rookery, Middleton Tyas, Yorkshire...

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Chorley, John Rutter (1806–1867), scholar of Spanish literature and poet, was born on 31 July 1806 at Blackley Hurst, near Billinge, Lancashire, the third of the four children of John Chorley (1771–1816), iron worker and lock maker, and his wife, Jane, née Wilkinson (1779–1851)...

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W. P. Courtney

revised by Philip Carter

Fox, Charles (1740?–1809), poet and orientalist, is of uncertain parentage and upbringing. It is most likely that he was the son of Joseph Fox, a Quaker grocer from Falmouth, though it is elsewhere suggested that he was the child of a John Fox...

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Gurney, Anna (1795–1857), Old English scholar, was born on 31 December 1795, the youngest child of Richard Gurney (1742–1811), partner in Gurney's Bank, of Keswick, near Norwich, Norfolk, and his second wife, Rachel (d. 1825), second daughter of Osgood Hanbury of Holfield Grange, Essex...

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Helmont, Franciscus Mercurius van, baron of Helmont and Merode in the nobility of the Holy Roman empire (1614–1698), physician and cabbalist, was born on 20 October 1614 at a house in the rue de Louvain, Vilvorde, near Brussels, the only surviving son of ...

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Howitt [née Botham], Mary (1799–1888), writer and translator, was born on 12 March 1799 at Coleford, Gloucestershire, the second child of Samuel Botham (1758–1823), a land surveyor, and Anne Wood (1764–1848). She and her elder sister, Anna, were brought up in Uttoxeter, Staffordshire...

Article

F. H. Groome

revised by Philip Carter

Hoyland, John (1750–1831), writer on Gypsy culture, is variously designated as 'of Sheffield, Yorkshire', and as 'formerly of York', although details of his parentage and upbringing are unknown, aside from his being a Quaker. It was, however, in the counties of ...

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Kilham [née Spurr], Hannah (1774–1832), missionary and student of African languages, born at Sheffield on 12 August 1774, was the seventh child of Peter and Hannah Spurr. Her father, a cutler by trade, was a strict Anglican, but her mother let her attend ...

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Ellen Marriage (1865–1946) by Lizzie Caswall Smith by kind permission of John Marriage

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Marriage [married name Garrett], Ellen (1865–1946), translator, was born on 23 August 1865 at Laboratory Yard, Stratford, Essex, the eldest of the four children of James Haworth Marriage (1839–1913), confectionery manufacturer, and his wife, Mary, née Brookfield (1835–1899). She spent her early life in ...

Article

Thompson Cooper

revised by Sarah Annes Brown

Massey, William (1691–1764?), writer and translator, born in January 1691 of Quaker parents, learned Latin, Greek, and French at a private grammar school kept by William Thompson at Nottingham, and afterwards took lessons in Hebrew from a clerk of the parish of St Gregory, Norwich...

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Meidel, Christopher (b. c. 1659, d. in or before 1715), Quaker minister and translator, was born probably in Skien, Norway, one of three or more children of Gert Meidel (c.1606–1696), a shipowner of Langesund, and his wife, Elen, whose surname was probably ...

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Moore, Sir Norman, first baronet (1847–1922), physician and Irish scholar, was born at Higher Broughton, Manchester, on 8 January 1847, the only child of Robert Ross Rowan Moore (1811–1864), barrister and political economist, of Kilmainham, Dublin, and his wife, Rebecca (1819–1905), daughter of ...

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Nodal, John Howard (1831–1909), journalist and dialectologist, was born on 19 September 1831 in Downing Street, Ardwick, Manchester, the son of Aaron Nodal (1798–1855), a Quaker grocer and town councillor. He was a member of the Society of Friends and was educated at ...

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Purver, Anthony (1702–1777), biblical translator and Quaker preacher, was the son of a farmer at Hurstbourne Tarrant, Hampshire. He was a promising pupil at the village school. While apprenticed to a shoemaker, he read Rusticus ad academicos by the Quaker Samuel Fisher. Fisher's...

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Russell, Thomas O'Neill [Tomás Ó Néill Ruiséal; pseud. Reginald Tierney] (1828–1908), a founder of the Gaelic League, was born in May 1828 at Lissanode, Moate, co. Westmeath, the youngest of the four sons and five daughters of Joseph Russell (1762–1837), a member of the ...

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Sewel, Willem (1653–1720), translator, lexicographer, and historian of Quakerism, was born in the Netherlands on 19 April 1653 at Angeliers Gracht, Amsterdam, probably the only child of Jakob Willemszoon Zewel (d. 1658/9), a surgeon, and his wife, Judith (c.1631–1664), daughter of ...

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Willem Sewel (1653–1720) by Jacob de Later, 1705 (after Gerrit Rademaker) Rijksprentenkabinet, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

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Jeremiah Holmes Wiffen (1792–1836) by William Brockedon, 1830 © National Portrait Gallery, London

Article

Alexander Gordon

revised by Charles Plouviez

Wiffen, Jeremiah Holmes (1792–1836), poet and translator, was born on 30 December 1792 at Woburn, Bedfordshire, the eldest of the six children of John Wiffen (1761–1802) and Elizabeth, née Pattison (1761–1841). Both parents came from Quaker families; his father was a poetry-loving ironmonger and his mother had been a dressmaker on the ...