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Bowrey, Thomas (d. 1713), merchant and compiler of the first Malay–English dictionary, is of obscure origins. It may be that he was the son of one Thomas Bowrey of Wapping, Middlesex, mariner, and he was certainly kin to some of the Wapping Bowreys...

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Edmund Castell (bap. 1606, d. 1686) by William Faithorne the elder, pubd 1669 © National Portrait Gallery, London

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Castell, Edmund (bap. 1606, d. 1686), orientalist and lexicographer, was baptized on 4 January 1606 at East Hatley, Cambridgeshire, the second son of Robert Castell, a man of property and education, and his wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Edmund Alleyn of Hatfield Peverel, Essex...

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Evans, Daniel Silvan (1818–1903), Welsh scholar and lexicographer, born at Fron Wilym Uchaf, Llannarth, Cardiganshire, on 11 January 1818, was the son of Silvanus Evans, a farmer, and his wife, Sarah. He attended a nearby school for two months at a house called ...

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G. B. Dibblee

revised by Elizabeth Goldring

Lee [Lea], Cromwell (d. 1601), compiler of an Italian dictionary, was younger son of Sir Anthony Lee (or Lea) of Burston and of Quarendon, Buckinghamshire, and his wife, the daughter of Sir Thomas Wyatt. He was the brother of Sir Henry Lee. Cromwell...

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O'Connell, Peter [Peadar Ó Conaill] (1754/5–1826), Irish scholar and lexicographer, was born at Carne, now Money Point, about 5 miles east of Kilrush in co. Clare, in an Irish-speaking district. Nothing is known of his parents (he had a brother, Patrick) or his early education. A 'tall, gaunt, swarthy man, large-limbed and black-haired, dark-eyed, and strongly built' (...

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Palsgrave, John (d. 1554), teacher and scholar of languages, was born in London. The identity of his parents is unknown, though Palsgrave was evidently close to his mother, his provision for her being mentioned in the state papers in 1529. He is first recorded at the end of 1503 as a student at ...

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Redhouse, Sir James William (1811–1892), lexicographer of Turkish, born, possibly in Surrey, on 30 December 1811, was the eldest son of James Redhouse and his wife, Elizabeth Saunders. Left fatherless at five, he entered Christ's Hospital, London, in 1819 but was expelled in 1826, after a truancy of six days. Within ...

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Reynolds, (Eva Mary) Barbara (1914–2015), Italian scholar, lexicographer, and translator, was born on 13 June 1914 at 53 Egerton Road, Bristol, the only child of Alfred Charles Reynolds (1884–1969), composer, and later musical director of the Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith...

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Sewel, Willem (1653–1720), translator, lexicographer, and historian of Quakerism, was born in the Netherlands on 19 April 1653 at Angeliers Gracht, Amsterdam, probably the only child of Jakob Willemszoon Zewel (d. 1658/9), a surgeon, and his wife, Judith (c.1631–1664), daughter of ...

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Willem Sewel (1653–1720) by Jacob de Later, 1705 (after Gerrit Rademaker) Rijksprentenkabinet, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

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Shaw, William (1749–1831), Gaelic grammarian and lexicographer, was born on 3 February 1749 at Clachaig on the island of Arran. He received his early education in Ayr and, from about 1768, at the University of Glasgow, where he was awarded the degree of MA, apparently in 1772, though one source gives 1777 as the date of his graduation. While a student he taught at a grammar school in ...

Article

G. C. Boase

revised by John D. Haigh

Spiers, Alexander (1807–1869), lexicographer, was born at Gosport in Hampshire. He studied in England, at Leipzig, and in Paris, and graduated doctor of philosophy at Leipzig. On the advice of the poet Andrieux (d. 1833), he settled in Paris as a professor of English, and found employment at the ...

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Wiliems [Williams], Thomas (b. 1545/6?, d. in or before 1623?), Welsh lexicographer, was the son of Wiliam ap Tomos ap Gronwy, and Catherine, the illegitimate daughter of Meredydd ab Ifan, founder of the Wynn family of Gwydir and great-grandfather of its historian, Sir John Wynn...