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Anwykyll, John (d. 1487), schoolmaster and grammarian, owned a surname, spelt in several ways, which is probably a variant of the place name Aldwincle in Northamptonshire. Anwykyll is first recorded as a student of grammar at Cambridge University in 1473–4, where he gained permission to graduate as a master of grammar in 1474–5. He next appears at Michaelmas 1483 as master of ...

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Bullokar, William (c. 1531–1609), spelling reformer and grammarian, belonged to a landed family from west Sussex, and in three surviving legal documents is styled gentleman. His parents were William Bullokar and Elizabeth Bowyer, of Broadwater, Sussex. William the younger may have been born at ...

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Bythner, Victorinus (c. 1605–c. 1670), grammarian and university teacher, was born at Głębowicach in the Sandomierz district of south-eastern Poland, one of several sons of Bartholomäus Bythner (1559/60–1629), a Catholic theologian of Calvinistic beliefs and the author of several influential works highly regarded by European Catholics and protestants alike. The ...

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Clemens Scottus [Clemens Scotus] (fl. c. 814–826), grammarian, was an Irish teacher at the court of Louis the Pious (r. 814–40). Born presumably in Ireland in the second half of the eighth century, he joined the band of Scotti peregrini, Irish migrants to ...

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Conches, William de (c. 1085–c. 1154), grammarian and commentator on classical texts, derived from Conches in south-east Normandy. The most important source for his life is the Metalogicon of John of Salisbury, who studied under William between 1138 and 1141. John says that ...

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Cornwall [Bryan], John (d. 1349), schoolmaster and grammarian, described himself in his will as 'John Bryan of Cornwall [Cornubia]', making it likely that he originated in that county. He occurs as an inhabitant of Oxford in 1341 and as master of a grammar school there between 1344 and 1349, his school lying between ...

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Dafydd Ddu o Hiraddug (d. in or before 1371), grammarian and poet, was presumably a native of the township of Hiraddug in the parish of Cwm, which was part of the commote of Rhuddlan in the hundred of Tegeingl in north-east Wales. He may have been the boy '...

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Edern Dafod Aur (fl. 13th–15th cent.), grammarian, is of very uncertain identity. Edern is a not uncommon personal name; the incorrect Edeyrn first appears in 1621. Dosbarth Edern Dafod Aur, a brief discussion attributed to him of the letters of the alphabet and of word-formations, is found in some five manuscripts dating from ...

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Einion Offeiriad (d. 1353?), grammarian, is the supposed author of the earliest extant Welsh bardic treatise (‘grammar’). Neither the personal name nor the epithet (which means ‘the Priest’) is uncommon and not all notices of an Einion Offeiriad need refer to the same person, though the concurrence of dates and of localities, together with the literary associations revealed in them, make it inherently probable that most actually do so. ...

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Farnaby, Thomas (1574/5–1647), schoolteacher and grammarian, was the son of a London carpenter, also named Thomas, and his wife, Dorothy Foxcroft; he was probably the Thomas Fernabye baptized at St Michael Bassishaw, London, on 21 September 1575. According to Wood, he was a relative of the composer ...

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Garland, John of (b. c. 1195, d. in or after 1258), grammarian, lexicographer, and poet, was born in England, in a place he calls by its Latin name Gingia, perhaps Ginge in the Wantage hundred in Berkshire.

Garland studied at Oxford University under one ...

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Haliday [O'Hara], William [pseud. Edmond O'Connell] (1788–1812), grammarian of Irish, was born in Dublin, the son of William Haliday, or Halliday, an apothecary; he was the elder brother of Charles Haliday. He was trained as a solicitor, and learned Irish from three Munstermen who lived in ...

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Hanneya [Hanney], Thomas (fl. 1313), grammarian, wrote a treatise, De quatuor partibus grammaticae ('On the four parts of grammar'), generally known as the Memoriale juniorum. This work, which discusses all four parts of Latin grammar in 160 pages, is extant in complete form in six medieval manuscripts, and incompletely or fragmentarily in three. A note at the end of the table of contents states that ...

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Hawkins, John (c. 1587–c. 1641), grammarian and translator, belonged to the old Catholic family of Hawkins from Nash Court, Boughton under Blean, Kent. He was the son of Sir Thomas Hawkins (1548/9–1617), landowner, and his wife, Ann, née Pettyt (1551/2–1616). Two of his elder brothers, ...

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Holt, John (d. 1504), schoolmaster and grammarian, was the son of William Holt (or Smyth), sometime mayor and tradesman of Chichester, Sussex, and, apparently, his first wife, Joan. His schooling may have taken place in Chichester, but he is first recorded being admitted as a probationary fellow of ...

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Horman, William (1457–1535), schoolmaster and grammarian, came from the parish of St Thomas, Salisbury, Wiltshire, and was admitted as a scholar of Winchester College in 1468. He was promoted to be a scholar of New College, Oxford, in 1475 and a fellow two years later, graduating BA in 1480 and MA about three years later. In 1484 he was ordained subdeacon at ...

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Kendal [Kendale], Richard (d. 1431?), grammarian, is recorded in the catalogue of the library of Syon Monastery, Isleworth, Middlesex (now Cambridge, Corpus Christi College, MS 141), as the author of a grammatical work which had apparently been lost from the library by 1526. In his index of British writers the sixteenth-century bibliographer ...

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Leylond [Leyland, Leland], John (d. 1428), grammarian, was perhaps a native of Leyland, Lancashire. He has been called ‘the elder’ to distinguish him from his namesake, probably a relative, the antiquary John Leland, who said of him, in words that may echo the grammarian's own publicity as well as substantial reputation: '...

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Lily, William (1468?–1522/3), grammarian and schoolmaster, was born at Odiham in Hampshire. Nothing is known of his parents, and the estimate of the date of his birth is based on his age at death, recorded as fifty-four on his memorial tablet in the old ...

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Ó Maolmhuaidh, Froinsias [Francis O'Molloy or Molloy] (c. 1606–1677?), theologian and grammarian, was born in the diocese of Meath, most probably in the traditional O'Molloy territory of Fercall, in the King's county portion of that diocese. His precise position within the O'Molloy kin group is not known. In old age he recorded stories he had heard from eyewitnesses in his youth of a great Christmas banquet for 960 people, lasting twelve days, held by ...