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Adams, James (1737–1802), Jesuit and philologist, was born on 3 November 1737 to William Adams and Anne or Sarah Spencer; he refers to Bury St Edmunds as his 'native town' (Euphonologia Linguae Anglicanae, 1794, 7). He was educated at the Jesuit college in ...

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Anwykyll, John (d. 1487), schoolmaster and grammarian, owned a surname, spelt in several ways, which is probably a variant of the place name Aldwincle in Northamptonshire. Anwykyll is first recorded as a student of grammar at Cambridge University in 1473–4, where he gained permission to graduate as a master of grammar in 1474–5. He next appears at Michaelmas 1483 as master of ...

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Bathe, William (1564–1614), Jesuit and linguistic scholar, was born on Easter Sunday, 2 April 1564, the eldest son of John Bathe (or Bath, d. 1586), of Drumcondra on the outskirts of Dublin, and his wife, Eleanor (d. c.1575), daughter of Jenico Preston, ...

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Richard Irvine Best (1872–1959) by John Butler Yeats, 1906 Courtesy of the National Gallery of Ireland

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Best, Richard Irvine (1872–1959), philologist and bibliographer, was born at 3 Bishop Street, Derry, on 17 January 1872, the son of Henry Best (who was of English descent), an excise officer, and his wife, Margaret Jane Irvine. He was educated at Foyle College...

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Blount, Thomas (1618–1679), antiquary and lexicographer, was born at Bordesley Park, Worcestershire, the eldest of the three sons and five daughters of Miles Blount (c.1585–1663), gentleman, and his wife, Anne (d. 1669), daughter of William Bustard of Adderbury. Both his parents were from strongly Catholic families and his adherence to the religion was to affect his life profoundly. It is not known where he was first educated, but he did not attend a university, and his choice of a legal training—he entered the ...

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Bonaparte, Louis Lucien (1813–1891), philologist, was born at Thorngrove, a house in the parish of Grimley, Worcestershire, on 4 January 1813, the sixth child of Lucien Bonaparte, prince of Canino (1775–1840), who was the second surviving brother of the emperor Napoléon I, and his second wife, ...

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Bullokar, John (bap. 1574, d. 1627), physician and lexicographer, was born in St Andrew's parish, Chichester, Sussex, and was baptized there on 8 November 1574, the third of four known children of William Bullokar (c. 1531–1609) and his wife, Elizabeth, née Diggons (...

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Bullokar, William (c. 1531–1609), spelling reformer and grammarian, belonged to a landed family from west Sussex, and in three surviving legal documents is styled gentleman. His parents were William Bullokar and Elizabeth Bowyer, of Broadwater, Sussex. William the younger may have been born at ...

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Bythner, Victorinus (c. 1605–c. 1670), grammarian and university teacher, was born at Głębowicach in the Sandomierz district of south-eastern Poland, one of several sons of Bartholomäus Bythner (1559/60–1629), a Catholic theologian of Calvinistic beliefs and the author of several influential works highly regarded by European Catholics and protestants alike. The ...

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Clemens Scottus [Clemens Scotus] (fl. c. 814–826), grammarian, was an Irish teacher at the court of Louis the Pious (r. 814–40). Born presumably in Ireland in the second half of the eighth century, he joined the band of Scotti peregrini, Irish migrants to ...

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Cokayne [alias Browne], Thomas [pseud. T. C.] (1587–1638), lexicographer, was born on 21 January 1587 at Mapleton, near Ashbourne, Derbyshire, the son of Sir Edward Cokayne of Ashbourne (d. 1606), sheriff of the county, and his wife, Jane (d...

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Conches, William de (c. 1085–c. 1154), grammarian and commentator on classical texts, derived from Conches in south-east Normandy. The most important source for his life is the Metalogicon of John of Salisbury, who studied under William between 1138 and 1141. John says that ...

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Cornwall [Bryan], John (d. 1349), schoolmaster and grammarian, described himself in his will as 'John Bryan of Cornwall [Cornubia]', making it likely that he originated in that county. He occurs as an inhabitant of Oxford in 1341 and as master of a grammar school there between 1344 and 1349, his school lying between ...

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Dafydd Ddu o Hiraddug (d. in or before 1371), grammarian and poet, was presumably a native of the township of Hiraddug in the parish of Cwm, which was part of the commote of Rhuddlan in the hundred of Tegeingl in north-east Wales. He may have been the boy '...

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Dillon, Emile Joseph [pseud. E. B. Lanin] (1854–1933), journalist and philologist, was born in Dublin on 21 March 1854, the second son of Michael Dillon, a foundry and hardware merchant, and his wife, Mary Byrne. In accord with his father's wishes, Dillon...

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Emile Joseph Dillon (1854–1933) by Sir William Orpen National Gallery of Ireland

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Edern Dafod Aur (fl. 13th–15th cent.), grammarian, is of very uncertain identity. Edern is a not uncommon personal name; the incorrect Edeyrn first appears in 1621. Dosbarth Edern Dafod Aur, a brief discussion attributed to him of the letters of the alphabet and of word-formations, is found in some five manuscripts dating from ...

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Einion Offeiriad (d. 1353?), grammarian, is the supposed author of the earliest extant Welsh bardic treatise (‘grammar’). Neither the personal name nor the epithet (which means ‘the Priest’) is uncommon and not all notices of an Einion Offeiriad need refer to the same person, though the concurrence of dates and of localities, together with the literary associations revealed in them, make it inherently probable that most actually do so. ...

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Farnaby, Thomas (1574/5–1647), schoolteacher and grammarian, was the son of a London carpenter, also named Thomas, and his wife, Dorothy Foxcroft; he was probably the Thomas Fernabye baptized at St Michael Bassishaw, London, on 21 September 1575. According to Wood, he was a relative of the composer ...