1-20 of 27 results  for:

  • Presbyterian x
  • religious controversialist x
Clear all

Article

Burne, Nicol (fl. 1574–1598), Roman Catholic controversialist, was probably born in the late 1550s. Little is known of his family or early education, except that he was (he said) brought up as a Calvinist and that his brother George (d. 1596) lived at ...

Article

Elwall, Edward (bap. 1676, d. 1744), Seventh Day Baptist and religious controversialist, was baptized on 9 November 1676 at Ettingshall in the parish of Sedgley, Staffordshire, the son of Thomas Elwall, yeoman and ironmonger, and his wife, Elizabeth Gibbins. He claimed his family had been settled in the neighbourhood of ...

Image

Caleb Fleming (1698–1779) by Mason Chamberlin, 1772 by permission of Dr Williams's Library

Article

Fleming, Caleb (1698–1779), dissenting minister and religious controversialist, was born at Nottingham on 4 November 1698 and baptized at High Pavement Presbyterian Chapel on 10 November, the son of James Fleming, a respectable hosier, and Mary Buxton, a member of the Buxton family of ...

Article

Fry, John (c. 1609–1656/7), religious controversialist, was the eldest son of William Fry (d. in or before 1631), landowner, of Iwerne Minster, Dorset, and his wife, Millicent, daughter of Robert Swaine of nearby Tarrant Gunville. His age was given in heralds' visitations of 1623 as fourteen, although the date of his admission to the ...

Article

Goldie, John (1717–1809), religious controversialist, was born at Craigmill, Galston, in Ayrshire, where his forebears had been millers on Cessnock Water for nearly 400 years. He had little schooling, but after his mother had taught him to read he soon learnt writing, and displayed early mechanical aptitude; at the age of fourteen he constructed a miniature mill, which could grind a boll of pease in a day. Although he served no apprenticeship he decided to become a cabinet maker and set himself up in nearby ...

Article

Goudy, Alexander Porter (1809–1858), minister of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland and religious controversialist, was the son of Andrew Goudy, Presbyterian minister of Ballywalter, co. Down, from 1802 to 1818, and Matilda, daughter of the Revd James Porter of Greyabbey (who was executed in 1798 for supposed complicity with the ...

Article

Alexander Gordon

revised by Marilyn L. Brooks

Gough, Strickland (d. 1752), religious controversialist, was born at Bristol, the son of Strickland Gough (d. 1718?), Presbyterian minister, and his wife, Elizabeth Comeper. His father served as assistant minister to the Lewin's Mead congregation in Bristol from 1699 until his dismissal, in 1708. He assisted ...

Article

Hog, James (d. 1736?), Church of Scotland minister and religious controversialist, was the son of Thomas Hog (1625–1680/81), minister of Larbert, Stirlingshire, and Marjory Murray of Philiphaugh (d. in or before 1693). Distinguished as a pious and thoughtful youth, with a particular gift for languages, philosophy, and theology, he graduated MA from ...

Article

Jameson, William (fl. 1689–1720), university teacher and religious controversialist, was born blind; nothing is known of his parents or background. He may have been William Gemisoune, a student at Glasgow University in 1676, and he may also have been a theology bursar there in 1691. ...

Image

Alexander Leighton (c. 1570–1649) by Wenceslaus Hollar, c. 1641 © National Portrait Gallery, London

Article

Leighton, Alexander (c. 1570–1649), religious controversialist, was probably born at Guildy, Monikie, near Dundee, the son of Duncan Leighton or Lichtoun; his mother is unknown. He was related to the Leightons of Usan and Ulyshaven, near Montrose, who held many important local offices. In 1587 he graduated MA at ...

Article

Logan, George (1678–1755), Church of Scotland minister and religious controversialist, was probably born in Glasgow, the son of George (or James) Logan, a merchant and burgess in the city, and his wife, Elizabeth, daughter of John Cunningham, minister of Old Cumnock. The family is thought to have originated in ...

Article

Marshall, Andrew (1779–1854), United Secession minister and religious controversialist, was born at Westerhill in the parish of Cadder, Lanarkshire, on 22 November 1779. He was educated locally before attending classes at Glasgow University. He also went to the Secession Divinity Hall at Selkirk...

Article

Mastertown, Charles (1679–1750), minister of the Presbyterian General Synod of Ulster and religious controversialist, was born in Scotland, probably near Linlithgow, on 23 March 1679, and was educated at Edinburgh University, whence he graduated MA on 28 June 1697. He was licensed to preach by the ...

Article

Maxwell, James (b. 1581?, d. in or after 1635), scholar and theological controversialist, is said to have been the sole son of William Maxwell of Little Airds. He frequently expressed pride in being the grandson of William Maxwell of Kirkconnel (fl. 1540–1567), who had served ...

Article

McBride, John (c. 1650–1718), minister of the Presbyterian General Synod of Ulster and religious controversialist, may have been the son of John McBryd, merchant, admitted a freeman of Belfast in 1644. He clearly came from Scottish stock but was almost certainly born in the north of ...

Article

Meldrum, George (1634?–1709), Church of Scotland minister and religious controversialist, was the fourth son of Andrew Meldrum, dyer and baillie of the city of Aberdeen. He studied divinity at Marischal College, Aberdeen, and in 1651 graduated MA. His prodigious intellect and undoubted ability as a teacher were quickly recognized, and in 1653 he was appointed as one of the regents, or bursars, of the college. He sat upon the ecclesiastical committee, which investigated irregularities in the administration of the parish of ...

Article

M'Gavin, William [pseud. a Protestant] (1773–1832), religious controversialist, was born on 25 August 1773 at Darnlaw, in the parish of Auchinleck, Ayrshire, the third son of James M'Gavin (1730–1789), a farmer, and his wife, Mary McMillan (d. 1814). He received little formal schooling, and moved with his family to ...

Article

Paul, John (1777–1848), Reformed Presbyterian church minister and religious controversialist, was born in January 1777 at Tobernaveen, near Antrim, where his father, John Paul, was a farmer. Having determined to become a minister of the Reformed Presbyterian body, to which his parents belonged, he entered the ...