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Bennett, Timothy (1676/7–1756), cordwainer and public access campaigner, is of obscure origins; details of his birth, family, and upbringing are unknown. On 19 July 1716, at All Hallows, London Wall, he married Katherine Magitt (1673/4–1749), of Kingston upon Thames, Surrey; the parish register—which also gives his wife's name as ...

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Brasher, Christopher William [Chris] (1928–2003), athlete, journalist, and businessman, was born on 21 August 1928 in Georgetown, British Guiana, the son of William Kenneth Brasher, a Colonial Office engineer, and his wife, Katie Howe Brasher. His family moved to Jerusalem and then, when ...

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Clark, William Stephens (1839–1925), shoe manufacturer and retailer, was born on 22 February 1839 at Street in Somerset, the third of fourteen children of James C. Clark (1811–1906), rug and shoe manufacturer of Street, and Eleanor, née Stephens (1812–1879), of Bridport. He was educated at ...

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Edward, Thomas (1814–1886), naturalist and shoemaker, was born on 25 December 1814 at Gosport, Hampshire, one of several children of John Edward, Fife militiaman and weaver, and Margaret Mitchell of Aberdeen. His early years were spent at Kettle, Fife, and at Aberdeen. From childhood he was passionately fond of animals, bringing home so many ‘beasties’ that he was frequently flogged and confined to the house. Utterly unmanageable, by the age of six he had been expelled from three schools because of his zoological pursuits and truancy. Abandoning school, he found employment at ...

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Odger, George (1813–1877), shoemaker and trade unionist, was born in Roborough, south Devon, the son of John Odger, a Cornish miner. After attending the village school, he became a shoemaker at an early age, tramping about the country before settling in London, where he became active in the ...

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O'Neill, John (1778–1858), shoemaker and writer, was born in Waterford city, Ireland, on 8 January 1778, the second son of Thomas O'Neill (d. c.1810), a poor shoemaker, and his wife, Jane, née English (1756/7–c.1828). John O'Neill finished his formal schooling at the age of nine and was largely self-educated. He worked as a shoemaker in ...