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Addenbrooke, John (bap. 1681, d. 1719), physician and benefactor, was born at Kingswinford in Staffordshire, and baptized on 13 June 1681 at the parish church in West Bromwich, the only son of Samuel Addenbrooke, vicar of West Bromwich, and Matilda Porry of Wolverhampton...

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Aldis, Charles James Berridge (1808–1872), physician and public health reformer, and the eldest son of Sir Charles Aldis (1776–1863), surgeon, was born in London on 16 January 1808. He was educated at St Paul's School and matriculated from Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1828; he graduated BA (1831), MB (1832), and MA (1834). ...

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Sir Henry Charles Burdett (1847–1920) by Bassano, 1897 © National Portrait Gallery, London

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Burdett, Sir Henry Charles (1847–1920), philanthropist and hospital reformer, was born on 18 March 1847 at Broughton, Northamptonshire, the son of Halford Robert Burdett (1813–1864), a clergyman in the parish of Gilmorton, Leicestershire, and his wife, Alsina, née Brailsford, from Lincolnshire. The Burdett...

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Chetham, Humphrey (bap. 1580, d. 1653), financier and philanthropist, the sixth child of Henry Chetham (c.1540–1603) of Crumpsall Hall, near Manchester, and his wife, Jane (c.1542–1616), the daughter of Robert Wroe of Heaton, was born at Crumpsall Hall, and baptized at ...

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Cox, William Sands (1802–1875), surgeon and a founder of Queen's College, Birmingham, was the eldest son of Edward Townsend Cox (1769–1863), a well-known Birmingham surgeon. After being educated locally at the King Edward VI Grammar School, he was articled to his father and began to study medicine at ...

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Greenhill, William Alexander (1814–1894), physician and sanitary reformer, was born at Stationers' Hall, London, on 1 January 1814, the youngest of the three sons of George Greenhill (1766–1850), secretary to the Stationers' Company, and his wife, Sarah Ann. The Greenhill family had a long-standing association with the ...

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Guy, Thomas (1644/5?–1724), philanthropist and founder of Guy's Hospital, the eldest of three children of Thomas Guy (d. 1652×4), lighterman, coalmonger, and carpenter, and his wife, Anne Vaughton of Tamworth, Staffordshire, was born in London in Pritchard's Alley, Fair Street, Horsleydown, Southwark...

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Harrison, Benjamin (1771–1856), hospital administrator and philanthropist, was born on 29 July 1771 at West Ham, Essex, the fourth son of Benjamin Harrison (1734–1797), treasurer of Guy's Hospital. His formal education is obscure, but he was well prepared for his life's work by living from the age of fourteen with his father in the treasurer's house at ...

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George Heriot (1563–1624) by David Scougall (after Paul van Somer) courtesy of George Heriot Trust, Edinburgh

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Heriot, George (1563–1624), jeweller and philanthropist, was born in Edinburgh on 15 June 1563, the eldest son of George Heriot (1539/40–1610), goldsmith and MP, of Edinburgh and his first wife, Elizabeth Balderstone. Heriot was apprenticed to his father's trade, and on 14 January 1586 he was contracted to marry ...

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Lane, Sir William Arbuthnot, first baronet (1856–1943), surgeon and health campaigner, was born at Fort George, near Inverness in Scotland, on 4 July 1856, the eldest child of Benjamin Lane (b. 1827), surgeon to the 80th regiment of foot, and his wife, ...

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Bartholomew Mosse (1712–1759) by unknown artist, c. 1745 Rotunda Hospital, Dublin; photograph National Portrait Gallery, London

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Mosse, Bartholomew (1712–1759), man-midwife and philanthropist, was born in Wexford, Ireland, one of seven children of the Revd Thomas Mosse (1662?–1731), rector of Maryborough, and his wife, Martha, daughter of the Revd Andrew Nisbet, rector of Timogue. Mosse was apprenticed at approximately age seventeen to ...

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Henry Moule (1801–1880) by unknown engraver courtesy of the Dorset County Museum

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Moule, Henry (1801–1880), Church of England clergyman and inventor of the dry earth closet, was born at Melksham, Wiltshire, on 27 January 1801, the sixth son of George Moule (1768–1830), solicitor and banker, and his wife, Sarah Hayward (1764–1835). He was educated at ...

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Read, Grantly Dick- (1890–1959), obstetrician and promoter of natural childbirth, was born at Beccles, Suffolk, on 26 January 1890, the son of Robert John Read (1851–1920), a flour miller of Norwich, and his wife, Frances (Fanny) Maria Sayer (1855–1942), of the White House, Thurlton, Norfolk...

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Salmon, Frederick (1796–1868), rectal surgeon and founder of St Mark's Hospital, London, was born on 11 April 1796 in Bath, the son of Henry Salmon (1754/5–1827), attorney, and his wife, Denne (1762/3–1853). Salmon was the sixth of nine children, of whom three boys and four girls survived into adulthood. His brothers ...

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Smith, (William) Frederick Danvers, second Viscount Hambleden (1868–1928), newsagent and hospital reformer, was born at Filey, Yorkshire, on 12 August 1868, the only surviving son and youngest of the six children of William Henry Smith (1825–1891), newsagent and politician, and his wife, Emily Leach, ...

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C. L. Falkiner

revised by Patrick Wallis

Steevens, Richard (1653–1710), physician and benefactor, and Grizell Steevens (1653–1747), his sister, born in Wiltshire, were the twin children of John Steevens (d. 1682), an English royalist clergyman, and his wife, Constance. The family left Wiltshire for Ireland some time after 1654, and ...