1-20 of 67 results  for:

  • Catholic archbishop x
Clear all

Article

Alen, John (1476–1534), archbishop of Dublin, is of unknown parentage. He received his undergraduate training at Gonville Hall, Cambridge, between 1491 and 1495, although there is an unverified tradition that he studied at the University of Oxford before migrating to Cambridge. After receiving his BA in 1494–5, he obtained a fellowship from ...

Article

Arundel [Fitzalan], Thomas (1353–1414), administrator and archbishop of Canterbury, was the third son of Richard (II) Fitzalan, third earl of Arundel and eighth earl of Surrey (c. 1313–1376), and his wife, Eleanor (d. 1372), the daughter of Henry, earl of Lancaster, and widow of ...

Article

Bainbridge, Christopher (1462/3–1514), ambassador, archbishop of York, and cardinal, was born at Hilton, near Appleby, Westmorland, the eldest of six children of Reginald Bainbridge and Isobel Langton; he owed much in his education and early advancement to his maternal uncle Thomas Langton, bishop of ...

Article

Beaton [Betoun], David (1494?–1546), cardinal and archbishop of St Andrews, was a younger son of John Beaton (d. 1532), of Balfour, Fife, and Elizabeth Monypenny (d. 1541), daughter of the laird of Pitmilly, Fife.

Beaton entered St Andrews University in 1508, transferred to that of ...

Article

Beaton, James (c. 1473–1539), administrator and archbishop of St Andrews, was the sixth son of John Beaton of Balfour in the parish of Markinch, and Marjory, daughter of Sir David Boswell of Balmouto in the parish of Kinghorn. For one who was later to hold the highest offices in church and state and to exercise immense power, it is noteworthy that he was not connected by blood to any of the noble houses of ...

Article

Beaton, James (1524–1603), diplomat and archbishop of Glasgow, born in the spring or early summer of 1524, was the son of James Beaton, laird of Balfarg (Fife), and his wife, Helen Melville. He belonged to the third generation of the Beaton hegemony in the church: lesser prelates apart, ...

Article

Becket, Thomas [St Thomas of Canterbury, Thomas of London] (1120?–1170), archbishop of Canterbury, was a London merchant's son who rose to be royal chancellor then archbishop, only to be murdered in his cathedral church. His posthumous reputation as a saint and martyr, with enduring thaumaturgical powers, was considerable throughout western Christendom, and in ...

Image

Thomas Becket (1120?–1170) manuscript illumination The British Library

Article

Blackadder [Blacader], Robert (c. 1445–1508), administrator and archbishop of Glasgow, may have been born in Berwickshire; he was the brother of Sir Patrick Blackadder of Tulliallan, Fife. He determined as BA at the University of St Andrews in 1462, was admitted to the faculty of arts at the ...

Article

Booth [Bothe], Laurence (c. 1420–1480), bishop of Durham and archbishop of York, was the illegitimate and probably youngest son of John Booth of Barton in Eccles, Lancashire (d. 1422). His mother is unknown. He was educated at Pembroke College, Cambridge, from which he took degrees in both civil and canon law by 1448. In 1442 he received papal dispensation as a son of unmarried parents for promotion to holy orders, and was duly ordained priest in 1446. By then he had already been presented to the rectory of ...

Article

Bourchier, Thomas (c. 1411–1486), cardinal and archbishop of Canterbury, was probably the second son of William Bourchier, count of Eu (c. 1374–1420), and Anne of Woodstock, daughter and heir of Thomas of Woodstock, duke of Gloucester, and granddaughter of Edward III. His mother's second marriage, to ...

Article

Chichele, Henry (c. 1362–1443), administrator and archbishop of Canterbury, was born about 1362, a date deducible from his statement in 1442 that he was then aged eighty or thereabouts. He was the third son of Thomas Chichele, burgess and perhaps draper of Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire...

Article

Colton, John (d. 1404), archbishop of Armagh and justiciar of Ireland, was born at Terrington, Norfolk. Chaplain by 1343 to William Bateman, bishop of Norwich, Colton became doctor of canon law at Cambridge c.1348. In June 1349 he was made first warden of ...

Article

Coutances, Walter de (d. 1207), administrator and archbishop of Rouen, was a native of Cornwall, son of Reinfrid and Gonilla, and brother of the royal servant Roger fitz Reinfrid, who probably introduced him into the king's household. His family probably originated in Normandy...

Article

Cranley, Thomas (c. 1337–1417), archbishop of Dublin and administrator, probably came from Cranleigh in Surrey. He was a student at Oxford and proceeded to the degree of doctor in divinity, his name first appearing in 1366, as a fellow of Merton College. He was ordained by ...

Image

Thomas Cranley (c. 1337–1417) memorial brass, c. 1417 © courtesy of the warden and scholars of New College, Oxford / The Bridgeman Art Library

Article

Deane, Henry (c. 1440–1503), administrator and archbishop of Canterbury, is first recorded in 1457 as a canon of Llanthony by Gloucester and a young student there. That he later pursued his studies at Oxford is indicated both by his reference in a letter, years afterwards, to that university as his 'most gracious mother' (...

Article

Dunbar, Gavin (c. 1490–1547), administrator and archbishop of Glasgow, was the third son of Sir John Dunbar of Mochrum, Wigtownshire, and his second wife, Janet Stewart, daughter of Alexander Stewart, third Lord Garlies. His date of birth is unknown, but his progression in the church suggests that he was born about 1490. His early years are shrouded in obscurity. It has been suggested that he was educated at ...

Article

Fitzsimons, Walter (d. 1511), archbishop of Dublin and lord deputy of Ireland, was born into a prominent family of the English of Dublin, being the son of Robert Fitzsimons and Janet Cusack. He first appears as precentor of St Patrick's Cathedral in 1471, and was acting as vicar-general of the diocese in May 1472. In 1476, he was the chapter's proctor in ...

Article

Forman, Andrew (c. 1465–1521), diplomat and archbishop of St Andrews, was probably the son of Nicholas Forman of Hatton, Berwickshire, and his wife, Janet Blackadder. He had at least two brothers. A determinant at St Andrews University in 1481, he graduated there two years later, when he was probably about eighteen; he does not appear to have proceeded MA. In the late 1480s he was employed by ...