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Ælfric of Eynsham [Ælfric Grammaticus, Ælfric the Homilist] (c. 950–c. 1010), Benedictine abbot of Eynsham and scholar, is of unknown origins, though his language suggests he came from Wessex. He was educated under Æthelwold in the monastic school at Winchester, and after becoming a monk and priest was sent about 987 to the abbey of ...

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Aldhelm [St Aldhelm] (d. 70910) drawing The British Library

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Aldhelm [St Aldhelm] (d. 709/10), abbot of Malmesbury, bishop of Sherborne, and scholar, was a prolific Latin author whose idiosyncratic style of composition in the media of prose and verse, both metrical and rhythmical, was profoundly influential both in England and on the continent up to the Norman conquest. His life is moderately well documented: ...

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Alfonsi, Petrus (fl. 1106–1126), scholar and translator of scientific works, was born in northern Spain, to Jewish parents. He was baptized a Christian on 29 June 1106 in Huesca, Aragon, with the names of the apostle on whose feast day the baptism took place and of his godfather, ...

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Ammonius, Andreas [Andrea della Rena] (bap. 1476, d. 1517), humanist scholar and poet, was the son of Elisabetta Vanni and her husband, Francesco della Rena (dell' Arena). Of a family long established as silk weavers at Lucca, he was baptized in the cathedral there on 13 October 1476. In preparation for an ecclesiastical career, he studied with ...

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Bartholomaeus Anglicus (b. before 1203, d. 1272) illuminated initial © The Bodleian Library, University of Oxford

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Bartholomaeus Anglicus (b. before 1203, d. 1272), Franciscan friar and encyclopaedist, is of unknown parentage, and there is no information about his early years. His association with the Suffolk Glanvilles, reported by John Leland, who identifies Bartholomaeus as Bartholomew de Glanville, depends upon a late fourteenth-century colophon in Cambridge, Peterhouse, MS 67. ...

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Basingstoke, John of [John Basing] (d. 1252), scholar and ecclesiastic, takes his name from the town of Basingstoke in Hampshire. Two contemporary sources speak of him: the chronicler Matthew Paris, and Robert Grosseteste, bishop of Lincoln (d. 1253). Basingstoke was closely associated with ...

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Benedict Biscop [St Benedict Biscop] (c. 628–689), abbot of Wearmouth and scholar, was born about 628 of a noble Northumbrian family, named in the life of Bishop Wilfrid by Stephen of Ripon (Eddius Stephanus) as Baducing. Bede provides the chief narrative for his life in the ...

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Bodi [Bode], John (fl. 1357), Benedictine monk and scholastic writer, graduated doctor of divinity at Oxford University. His institutional affiliation is not known, but he might have been attached to Gloucester College, which was established for monks of his order. His personal circumstances are known only from an incident in which a friar was ordered by the university to make a public apology for having made insulting references to him in a lecture of 20 December 1357. The following January ...

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Bradshaw, Henry (d. 1513), scholar and hagiographer, was a Benedictine monk of the abbey of St Werburgh, Chester. He was probably professed in the mid-1490s since he was ordained subdeacon in 1499 and deacon and priest the following year. Although there is no evidence to corroborate ...

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Bullock, Henry (d. 1526), humanist scholar, entered the University of Cambridge about the year 1500. His family background is unknown. Fuller believed that he was 'most probably' born in Berkshire, 'where his ancient name appears in a worshipful estate' (...

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Byrhtferth of Ramsey (fl. c. 986–c. 1016), Benedictine monk and scholar, was the author of a substantial corpus of writing, in both Latin and Old English. Very little is known of his life beyond what can be gleaned from incidental references in his writings....

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See Siôn Cent [John Kent]

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Chaundler, Thomas (c. 1417–1490), university principal and humanist scholar, was born at Wells, in St Cuthbert's parish, the son probably of William Chaundler and possibly the brother of Geoffrey and John, clerks of Somerset parishes. John Chaundler, bishop of Salisbury (1417–26), may have been a kinsman, and the ...

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Cheriton, Odo of (1180s–1246), author and scholar, was born in Kent in the 1180s, into a wealthy Anglo-Norman family originally settled at Cheriton near Folkestone by a founding Odo, recorded as being kin to the then archbishop of Canterbury. His father, William of Cheriton...

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See Meath, saints of

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Cornwall, Peter of (1139/40–1221), scholar and prior of Holy Trinity, Aldgate, was born on his father's estates in or near Launceston, Cornwall, the son of Jordan of Trecarrel (d. c.1180), sometime praepositus (or provost) of Launceston. In his Liber revelationum, book 1, chapter 6, he gives some account of his father's character, and he relates stories concerning his grandfather ...

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Dícuil (fl. c. 795–825), scholar and teacher, of Irish descent, went to the continent some time between 795 and 814 as one of an international constellation of Anglo-Saxon, Visigothic, Italian, and Irish scholars attracted to the court of Charlemagne (r. 768–814). The palatine scholars provided impetus and direction to the Carolingian reform of education and learning....

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Doget [Doket], John (d. 1501), humanist scholar and college head, was the nephew of Cardinal Thomas Bourchier, archbishop of Canterbury (d. 1486), to whom Doget must have owed much of the considerable church patronage later bestowed on him. He was born in ...