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Archdale, Helen Elizabeth [Betty] (1907–2000), feminist, cricketer, and educationist, was born at 59 Oxford Terrace, Bayswater, London, on 21 August 1907, the only daughter of the Scottish feminist and journalist Helen Alexander Archdale, née Russel (1876–1949), and her husband, ...

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Bracey [née Phillips], Joan (1656?–1685?), highwaywoman, was the daughter of John Phillips, a wealthy farmer in Northamptonshire. The principal source of evidence relating to Joan is Alexander Smith's A Complete History of the Lives and Robberies of the most Notorious Highwaymen...

Article

Cave [married name Altof], Bertha (1881–1951), campaigner for opening the legal profession to women, was born at Park Lodge, Sundridge, Kent, on 14 November 1881, the daughter and elder of two children of James Thomas Cave (b. 1845), a domestic servant and later butler to ...

Article

Clay, Marcy [alias Jenny Fox] (d. 1665), highwaywoman and thief, is said to have been born in Dorset, the daughter of travelling pedlars. The anonymous pamphlet The High-Way Woman is the only extant biography of Marcy and no other evidence has yet come to light to corroborate its claims. It describes how, at the age of fifteen, ...

Article

Ferrers [married name Fanshawe], Catherine (1634–1660), alleged highwaywoman, was born on 4 May 1634, reputedly (although there is no evidence for this) at Markyate Cell in the parish of Caddington, near Dunstable, Hertfordshire, the only surviving daughter of Knighton Ferrers (bap...

Article

Voss, Jane [alias Jane Roberts] (d. 1684), highwaywoman and thief, reputedly was born in St Giles-in-the-Fields in London. The German Princess Revived, or, The London Jilt (1684), the only contemporary full-length biography of Jenny, as she was known, appears to be a highly sensationalized and romanticized account of her life and no evidence has emerged to support its claims for her early life before she reached ...