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Angwin, Sir (Arthur) Stanley (1883–1959), electrical engineer, was born in Penzance on 11 December 1883, the son of the Revd George William Angwin, a nonconformist minister, and his wife, Lucinda Cambellock. A change of circuit brought the family nearer London, and Angwin went to school in ...

Article

H. M. Stephens

revised by James Falkner

Baker, Sir William Erskine (1808–1881), army officer and engineer, was the fourth son of Captain Joseph Baker RN, and was born on 29 November 1808 at Leith. He was educated at Ludlow and at Addiscombe College (1825–6), and after attending an extended engineering course while a cadet he went out to ...

Article

Brown, Sir Samuel (1776–1852), civil engineer and naval officer, was born in London, the eldest son of William Brown of Borland, Galloway, and his wife, a daughter of the Revd Robert Hogg, of Roxburgh. Brown entered the navy as an able seaman in June 1795, serving with distinction during the Napoleonic wars from that year. He was commissioned in 1800 and, as lieutenant on the ...

Article

Brownhill, Rowland William (1834–1895), engineer and local politician, was born in Tipton, Staffordshire, the second of seven sons in a family of ten; his parents, William Brownhill (b. 1789), iron founder, and his wife, Elizabeth, were nonconformists. Brownhill's education and early training are obscure, but he married on 30 October 1860 and with his wife, ...

Article

G. C. Boase

revised by Christopher F. Lindsey

Brunton, William (1777–1851), engineer, was the eldest of three sons of Robert Brunton, a watch- and clockmaker at Dalkeith, Edinburghshire, Scotland, where he was born on 26 May 1777. He studied mechanics in his father's shop and engineering under his grandfather, who was a local colliery viewer. In 1790 he commenced work in the fitting shops of the ...

Article

Castle, Richard (d. 1751), architect and engineer, may have adopted his surname, which also appears as Castles, Cassel, and Cassels, to indicate a connection with Kassel in Germany. According to the biography in Anthologia Hibernica for October 1793, which is the principal source of information about him, he was born in ...

Article

Caus, Salomon de (c. 1576–1626), engineer and architect, was born in the pays de Caux (whence derived the family name) in Normandy, probably in Dieppe. He was a relative (possibly an uncle) of Isaac de Caus (1589/90–1648). In all probability Salomon's parents were Huguenots who took refuge in ...

Article

Field, Joshua (1786–1863), engineer, was born at Hackney, Middlesex, the son of John Field, a corn and seed merchant in the City of London. His father afterwards became master of the Worshipful Company of Merchant Taylors. In 1794 Field was sent to a boarding-school at ...

Article

Fleming, Sir Arthur Percy Morris (1881–1960), electrical engineer, was born on 16 January 1881 in Newport, Isle of Wight, the youngest of the three sons of Frank Fleming and his wife, Fanny Morris, a farming family of that locality. On completion of his education at the ...

Article

Garnett, Arthur William (1829–1861), army officer and engineer, was born on 1 June 1829, the younger son of William Garnett (1793–1873) and his first wife, Ellen (d. 1829), daughter of Solomon Treasure. He was educated at Addiscombe College from 1844 to 1846, was commissioned second-lieutenant on 12 June 1846, and went to ...

Article

Handyside, William (1793–1850), engineer, was born on 25 July 1793, in Edinburgh, the eldest child of Hugh Handyside, ironmonger, and Margaret Baird. At the age of fifteen he became a pupil of a Mr White, a local architect, but did not complete his training. In 1810 his uncle, ...

Image

Dame Caroline Harriet Haslett (1895–1957) by Sir Gerald Kelly, c. 1949 © reserved; by courtesy of the Royal Society of Arts / National Portrait Gallery, London

Article

Haslett, Dame Caroline Harriet (1895–1957), electrical engineer and electricity industry administrator, was born at Worth, Sussex, on 17 August 1895, the second of the five children of Robert Haslett (b. c.1864, d. after 1957), a railway signal fitter and a pioneer of the co-operative movement, and his wife, ...

Image

John Hopkinson (1849–1898) by unknown photographer © National Portrait Gallery, London

Article

T. H. Beare

revised by S. Hong

Hopkinson, John (1849–1898), electrical engineer, was born on 27 July 1849 in Manchester, the eldest of the five children of John Hopkinson, mechanical engineer, and his wife, Alice, daughter of John Dewhurst of Skipton. Sir Alfred Hopkinson, lawyer, was his younger brother. He was educated under ...

Article

Kirkaldy, David (1820–1897), engineer, was born on 4 April 1820 at Mayfield, near Dundee, the second among three children of William Kirkaldy (1786–1858), merchant and shipper, and his wife, Susannah (1796–1824), daughter of George Davidson of Dunoon and his wife, Margaret. His parents were both Scottish....

Article

Labelye, Charles (bap. 1705, d. 1762), engineer and mathematician, was born in Vevey, Switzerland, and baptized on 12 August 1705, the son of François Dangeau La Bélye and his wife, Elisabeth, née Grammont. The baptismal entry of a subsequent child in 1709 described the father as '...

Article

Lovell, Thomas (d. in or after 1615), engineer and soldier, was probably from a family that farmed lands in Huntingdonshire and Norfolk (though he should not be confused with the prominent Norfolk gentleman Sir Thomas Lovell). In 1596 he recalled that he had served for thirty years in the wars of foreign countries, so he may have first fought for the Huguenots in the French wars of religion. In 1572 the ...

Article

Low, William (1814–1886), civil engineer, was born on 11 December 1814 at Rothesay, Bute, Scotland, the eldest son of John Low, a leather currier, and Mary McKinzie, a labourer's daughter. In 1815 the family moved to Glasgow where William was raised. He was apprenticed to ...

Article

Mallet, Robert (1810–1881), civil engineer and scientist, was born at Ryder's Row in Dublin on 3 June 1810, the son of John and Thomasina Mallet. His father came from Devon in 1780 to join his uncle's brass and copper founding business. Mallet received his early education at ...