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Ferranti, Basil Reginald Vincent Ziani de (1930–1988), industrialist and politician, was born on 2 July 1930 in Alderley Edge, Cheshire, the younger son and youngest of the five children of Sir (Gerard) Vincent Sebastian de Ferranti (1893–1980) [see under Ferranti, Sebastian Ziani de (1864-1930)...

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Holker, John (1719–1786), Jacobite soldier and industrialist, was born on 14 October 1719 at Stretford, near Manchester, the son of John Holker, probably a blacksmith, and Alice, daughter of John Morris. His father died early; his mother was still alive in 1760. He was a partner with ...

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Isaacs, Godfrey Charles (1866–1925), industrialist, was born in 1866, the fourth son and seventh of nine children of Joseph Michael Isaacs (1832–1908), a London fruit and ship broker, and his wife, Sarah (1835–1922), daughter of Daniel Davis. Godfrey Isaacs was of a Jewish family which had overcome considerable prejudice to make its mark in public life. His uncle, ...

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Martin, Sir Thomas Acquin (1850–1906), engineer and industrialist, born at Four Oaks, Sutton Coldfield, near Birmingham, on 6 March 1850, was the son of Patrick William Martin, leather manufacturer, of Birmingham, and his wife, Mary Anne, née Bridges. After education at the Birmingham Oratory School, Edgbaston...

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Edwin Noel Auguste Plowden, Baron Plowden (1907–2001) by Walter Bird, 1966 © National Portrait Gallery, London

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Plowden, Edwin Noel Auguste, Baron Plowden (1907–2001), industrialist and public servant, was born on 6 January 1907 at the Mansion House, Strachur, Argyll, the second of three sons and second of four children of Roger Herbert Plowden (1853–1921), banker and landed proprietor, and his second wife, ...

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Women in trade and industry in York (act. c. 1300–c. 1500), were enfranchised in some numbers as citizens in their own right, but there is no evidence that they were allowed any political voice. Equally, although the freedom of York was by the later middle ages a prerequisite for persons to set up shop and employ labour, it did not constitute a significant means of access to careers in commerce for women. Some women were enfranchised by right of patrimony—perhaps a reflection of their social status—others as petty retailers such as hucksters, chapwomen, and upholders. A handful occupied more significant niches, for example ...

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Women traders and artisans in London (act. c. 1200–c. 1500), formed a significant group within the city's workforce at every social level. City custom allowed them considerable economic opportunities. No more than men are they commonly recorded before about 1250, but thereafter wills and the records alike of city government and of ...