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See Bond, Martin

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Conant, Sir Nathaniel (1745–1822), bookseller and police magistrate, was born on 10 April 1745, the sixth of eight sons of John Conant, rector of Hastingleigh and vicar of Elmstead, Kent, and his wife, Mary, daughter of the Revd William Wake. Four of his older brothers died in childhood or early adolescence. The ...

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Dighton, William (1717–1769), excise officer and murder victim, was born in 1717, though further details of his family and early life are unknown. His first post was in Gloucester in 1741; thereafter he worked in Evesham, Worcestershire, and Woodstock, Oxfordshire. By 1758 Dighton...

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Fitzwilliam, Sir William (1460?–1534), merchant tailor and sheriff of London, may have been a younger son of John and Ellen Fitzwilliam of Milton and Greens Norton in Northamptonshire. He began his career in London and was a servant to Sir John, husband of ...

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Hayes, John Henry [Jack] (1887–1941), police officer, trade unionist, and politician, was born on 14 October 1887 at 11 Mitre Fold, Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, one of seven children of John William Hayes, policeman, and his wife, Sarah (née Inchley). His father rose to the rank of chief inspector, and ...

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Payne, William (1717/18–1782), carpenter and constable, was probably born in London; details of his parents and background are unknown. He is now best remembered for his activities from the late 1750s in policing London streets and as an agitator against the capital's Roman Catholic community, but he worked first as a carpenter. He was apprenticed to a master in ...

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Shaw, Christian (b. c. 1685, d. in or after 1737), witch accuser and thread manufacturer, was the daughter of the laird of Bargarran, Renfrewshire, whose first name is unrecorded. According to a contemporary account (A True Narrative), when she was eleven years old she began to experience alarming symptoms, not only suffering mysterious fits, during which her body became as stiff as a board, her belly swelled, and her eyes rolled back into her head, but also vomiting balls of hair, pins, and hot embers. She had hallucinations too. The devil himself reportedly appeared before her and to the amazement of all beholders she engaged in complicated theological arguments with him, citing biblical texts with surprising accuracy. She also had lengthy discussions with a series of invisible tormentors whom she described as witches. They nipped and bit her, she said, pointing to the marks they had left. Questioned as to their identity, she named various local men and women, and this was to have catastrophic consequences....