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Abbo of Fleury [St Abbo of Fleury] (945x50–1004), abbot of St Benoît-sur-Loire, was a French monk influential, by both his presence in England and his writings, in the monastic revival of the late tenth century. He was born in the region of Orléans...

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Adam [Adam of Caithness] (d. 1222), abbot of Melrose and bishop of Caithness, is variously described as having been a foundling and as having originated in Cumberland. He was elected bishop on 5 August 1213 when he was abbot of Melrose, the third bishop to be appointed to ...

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Adomnán [St Adomnán] (627/8?–704), abbot of Iona and writer, who became known to history as the ninth abbot of Iona and the outstanding Irish churchman of his day, was born of the royal line of Cenél Conaill, a dynasty which formed part of the over-kingdom of the northern ...

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Æbbe [St Æbbe, Ebba] (d. 683?), abbess of Coldingham, was the daughter of Acha, queen of Northumbria, and uterine sister of kings Oswald and Oswiu. According to late and unverifiable traditions preserved mainly in a life ascribed to the twelfth-century hagiographer Reginald of Durham...

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Ælfflæd [St Ælfflæd, Elfleda] (654–714), abbess of Strensall–Whitby, was the daughter of Oswiu, king of Northumbria (d. 670), and his wife, Eanflæd. She was dedicated to religion when scarcely a year old, in fulfilment of a vow made by her father before his victory at the battle of the ...

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Ælfric of Eynsham [Ælfric Grammaticus, Ælfric the Homilist] (c. 950–c. 1010), Benedictine abbot of Eynsham and scholar, is of unknown origins, though his language suggests he came from Wessex. He was educated under Æthelwold in the monastic school at Winchester, and after becoming a monk and priest was sent about 987 to the abbey of ...

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Ælfric (II) (supp. fl. 1070), supposed abbot of St Albans, appears among the mid-eleventh-century abbots of St Albans in the Gesta abbatum as begun c.1250 by Matthew Paris, who apparently used an 'ancient roll' of Bartholomew the clerk, servant of the twelfth-century ...

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William Hunt

revised by Marios Costambeys

Ælfweard (d. 1044), abbot of Evesham and bishop of London, is said by the chronicle of Evesham to have been a relative of Cnut, presumably through Cnut's first, English, wife, Ælfgifu of Northampton. He was a monk of Ramsey and was made abbot of ...

Article

William Hunt

revised by Marios Costambeys

Ælfwig (d. 1066), abbot of New Minster, Winchester, is reliably evident only in the Liber vitae of New Minster (later Hyde Abbey). This work gives the probable year of his appointment as 1063, and the information that he was killed in the battle of ...

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Aethelwig (d. 1077/8), abbot of Evesham and administrator, was the son of an otherwise little-known thegn named Ordwig. Claims made in Thomas of Marlborough's History of the Abbey of Evesham, that he was a man 'of great nobility of family' (Sayers and ...

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Æthelwold [St Æthelwold, Ethelwold] (904x9–984), abbot of Abingdon and bishop of Winchester, was a leading figure in the tenth-century church reform movement. He was born in Winchester to noble parents during the reign of Edward the Elder, probably between 904 and 909.

As a youth ...

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Ailred [Ælred, Æthelred] of Rievaulx (1110–1167), religious writer and abbot of Rievaulx, was probably the youngest of the three sons of Eilaf, the last hereditary priest of the church of St Andrew at Hexham, grandson of Eilaf, treasurer of Durham, and great-grandson of the learned ...

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Albinus (d. 732), abbot of St Peter's and St Paul's, Canterbury, was an informant of Bede. What is known of him is derived almost entirely from Bede's Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum. Albinus was a pupil of Archbishop Theodore and his coadjutor Hadrian, abbot of ...

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Alcuin [Albinus, Flaccus] (c. 740–804), abbot of St Martin's, Tours, and royal adviser, was a major figure in the revival of learning and letters under the Frankish king and emperor, Charlemagne (r. 768–814).

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Alcuin (c. 740–804) medallion drawing © reserved

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Aldhelm [St Aldhelm] (d. 709/10), abbot of Malmesbury, bishop of Sherborne, and scholar, was a prolific Latin author whose idiosyncratic style of composition in the media of prose and verse, both metrical and rhythmical, was profoundly influential both in England and on the continent up to the Norman conquest. His life is moderately well documented: ...

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Aldhelm [St Aldhelm] (d. 70910) drawing The British Library

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Aldred (fl. c. 970), provost of Chester-le-Street and glossator, is known through three manuscripts. He added an interlinear Old English gloss and a colophon to the Lindisfarne gospels of c.698 (BL, Cotton MS Nero D.iv), four collects in honour of St Cuthbert...

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Alexandre, Pierre [pseud. Simon Alexius] (c. 1498–1563), prior of Arras and theologian, was born in Arras where he entered the Carmelite priory. He studied theology at Paris, gaining his doctorate there on 11 December 1534. This suggests he was born about 1498. Having become Carmelite prior at ...

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Allanson, Peter [name in religion Athanasius] (1804–1876), historian and abbot of Glastonbury, was born on 11 June 1804 in Castle Street, Holborn, London, the second son of William Walter Allanson and his wife, Mary Ann Barber, from Lambeth. The family was Roman Catholic and ...