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Cumin [Comyn], John (d. 1212), archbishop of Dublin and royal servant, may have come from a minor Somerset family. Certainly it is in connection with this county that his name first appears in the official records: in 1158 and 1159 John Cumin was pardoned debts in ...

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Geoffrey (1151?–1212), archbishop of York, was the illegitimate son of Henry II. He was probably named after his paternal grandfather, Geoffrey of Anjou (d. 1151).

Geoffrey's date of birth is suggested by indirect evidence. ...

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Geoffrey (1151?–1212) seal Chapter of Durham Cathedral

Article

Scheves, William (b. in or before 1440, d. 1497), courtier and archbishop of St Andrews, may have been the son of John Scheves, clerk register and official of St Andrews during the reign of James II. Probably born shortly before 1440, he was a determinant in the faculty of arts at the ...

Article

Stewart, Alexander (c. 1493–1513), administrator and archbishop-designate of St Andrews, was the illegitimate son of James IV, king of Scots (1473–1513), and Marion Boyd. His mother, with whom James IV had a liaison between 1492 and 1494, was the daughter of Archibald Boyd...

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Stewart, James, duke of Ross (1476–1504), archbishop-designate of St Andrews, was the second son of James III, king of Scots, and his wife, Margaret of Denmark. Born early in 1476, James was immediately created marquess of Ormond, and along with his elder brother, the future ...

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Wolsey, Thomas (1470/71–1530), royal minister, archbishop of York, and cardinal, was the son of Robert Wulcy or Wolsey of Ipswich (d. 1496) and his wife, Joan Daundy (d. 1509). Wolsey's father ran a tavern in the parish of St Mary at the Elms, Ipswich...

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Thomas Wolsey (1470/7171–1530) by unknown artist, late 16th cent. [original, c.1520] © National Portrait Gallery, London