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Horace Gundry Alexander (1889–1989) by Morland Braithwaite private collection

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Alexander, Horace Gundry (1889–1989), Quaker envoy and mediator, was born on 18 April 1889 at Croydon, Surrey, the youngest of four sons of Joseph Gundry Alexander (1848–1918), a Quaker barrister and advocate of international arbitration, and of Josephine Crosfield Alexander. He was educated at ...

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Andrew [St Andrew] (fl. 1st cent.), apostle and patron saint of Scotland, was a fisherman from Capernaum in Galilee.

In the synoptic gospels Andrew is merely mentioned as one of the twelve disciples of Jesus, but in the gospel of St John he appears as a follower of ...

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Appulby, Simon [Symon the Anker of London Wall] (d. 1537), religious recluse and author, was the last anchorite to be attached to the church of All Hallows, London Wall. An ordained priest, Simon made his anchoritic profession at the nearby priory of the ...

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Attlee [née Millar], Violet Helen, Countess Attlee (1895–1965), charity fund-raiser and prime minister’s wife, was born at Heathdown, East Heath Road, Hampstead, on 20 November 1895, the youngest of eleven children of Henry Edward Millar (1856–1912), a commission merchant in import/export trade, and his wife, ...

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Balthere [St Balthere, Baldred, Balther] (d. 756), hermit, is often confused with an earlier saint of the same name. The later and better-known Balthere was described by his near contemporary Alcuin, in his poem on the bishops, kings, and saints of York. The so-called ...

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Bannatyne, Richard (d. 1605), secretary to John Knox, may have originated in western Scotland, for his brother James was a merchant in Ayr around the time of Richard's death. There is no evidence to support suggestions that he belonged to the same family as his contemporary ...

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Bartholomew of Farne [St Bartholomew of Farne] (d. 1193), hermit, stands second in reputation only to Godric of Finchale among the hermits of northern England in the twelfth century. Just as Godric's fame depends on the life written by Reginald, a monk of ...

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See Baxter, Richard

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Beadon, Frederick (1777–1879), Church of England clergyman and centenarian, third son of the Revd Edward Beadon, rector of North Stoneham, Hampshire, was born in London on 6 December 1777. He was educated at Charterhouse School and at Trinity College, Oxford. He took orders in 1801, and was shortly afterwards presented by his uncle, ...

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Billfrith [St Billfrith] (d. 750x800?), anchorite, is mentioned in the Old English colophon which the scribe Aldred added to the Lindisfarne gospels (BL, Cotton MS Nero D.iv) at some time between 950 and about 970, when they were at Chester-le-Street. After naming ...

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Catherine Bramwell- Booth (1883–1987) by Snowdon, 1979 Snowdon / Camera Press, London; collection National Portrait Gallery, London

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Booth, Catherine Bramwell- (1883–1987), Salvation Army officer, was born on 20 July 1883 at Hadley Wood, Middlesex, the eldest in the family of two sons and five daughters of (William) Bramwell Booth (1856–1929), Salvation Army general, and his wife, Florence Eleanor Booth, née...

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Borstale, Thomas (supp. fl. 1290), supposed Augustinian hermit, is said by Bale to have come from Norfolk and to have studied in England, and taught theology at the University of Paris c.1290. Bale adds that Borstale died at the Augustinian convent in ...

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Breakwell, Thomas (1872–1902), the first English Bahaءi convert, was born at Ellen Street, Woking, Surrey, on 31 May 1872, the youngest of the five children of Edward Breakwell, blacksmith, and his wife, Elizabeth, née Knight. He received his elementary education at the local school, and subsequently emigrated with his family to the ...

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Brigit [St Brigit, Brigid] (439/452–524/526), patron saint of Kildare, is the only native Irish saint to enjoy a widespread cult in all the Celtic countries. About the events of her life little can be said, since the earliest sources come from more than a century after her supposed death, on 1 February in either 524 or 526, and were in any case interested in miracle stories rather than biographical detail. Her early cult is, however, among the most influential and the most interesting of any saint in ...

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Margaret H. B. Sanderson

Campbell, Alison (d. 1608), minister's wife, was the daughter of an Ayrshire laird, James Campbell of Stevenston (fl. 1542–1581). Soon after the Reformation (1560) she married, at some date after August 1560, William Kirkpatrick (d. 1577), former monk of Kilwinning Abbey, Ayrshire...

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Caradog (1060x75–1124), hermit and monk, was the son of noble parents from Brycheiniog (Brecon). The principal source for his life is an account in Capgrave's Nova legenda Angliae which probably derives from a life, now lost, written by Gerald of Wales...

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Cardale, John Bate (1802–1877), first apostle of the Catholic Apostolic church, was born at 28 Lamb's Conduit Street, Holborn, London, on 7 November 1802, the eldest of five children. His father, William Cardale, a solicitor and Worcestershire landowner, was born on 17 July 1777 and died at ...

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Carpenter, Christina (fl. 1329–1332), religious recluse, was the unmarried daughter of William, a carpenter who lived in the tiny Surrey village of Shere in the second and third decades of the fourteenth century. Of humble birth, Christina was seemingly destined for an unremarkable and historically invisible life. However, in the summer of 1329 she took the serious step of applying to the bishop of ...