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See Abberbury family

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Æthelberht [St Æthelberht, Ethelbert] (779/80–794), king of the East Angles, was the son of King Æthelred of the East Angles and was executed in 794 by order of King Offa of Mercia, as a result of which he came to be regarded as a royal martyr. His cult, which probably started life as a focus for resistance to ...

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Æthelberht (779/8080–794) coin © Copyright The British Museum

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Æthelthryth [St Æthelthryth, Etheldreda, Audrey] (d. 679), queen in Northumbria, consort of King Ecgfrith, and abbess of Ely, was the daughter of Anna, king of the East Angles (d. 654?). Her immediate kindred was dominated by women in religion, later venerated as saints, including three sisters, ...

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Æthelwine [Ethelwine, Æthelwine Dei Amicus] (d. 992), magnate and founder of Ramsey Abbey, Huntingdonshire, was the fourth and youngest son of Æthelstan, known as the Half-King (932–956), and his wife, Ælfwyn (d. 986). He was a few years older than the atheling ...

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Aigueblanche, Peter d' [Peter de Aqua Blanca] (d. 1268), bishop of Hereford and royal councillor, was descended from the family of Briançon, holders of the lordship of Aigueblanche (Savoie) in the Tarentaise or valley of the upper Isère, dependants of the counts of Savoy...

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Peter d' Aigueblanche (d. 1268) tomb effigy by permission of the Dean and Chapter of Hereford Cathedral

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Alcuin [Albinus, Flaccus] (c. 740–804), abbot of St Martin's, Tours, and royal adviser, was a major figure in the revival of learning and letters under the Frankish king and emperor, Charlemagne (r. 768–814).

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Alcuin (c. 740–804) medallion drawing © reserved

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Alfred [Ælfred] (848/9–899), king of the West Saxons and of the Anglo-Saxons, was born at Wantage. He was the youngest of at least six children of King Æthelwulf of Wessex (d. 858) and of Osburh, daughter of Oslac, the king's butler (said to be descended from the family that founded the kingdom of the ...

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Alfred (848/99–899) silver penny, 871–99 © Copyright The British Museum

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Avranches, Hugh d', first earl of Chester (d. 1101), magnate and founder of Chester Abbey, was the son of Richard Goz, vicomte d'Avranches and seigneur de St Sever, and an unknown mother formerly identified on the basis of unsatisfactory evidence as Emma, supposedly a half-sister of ...

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Ayscough, Francis (1701–1763), courtier and Church of England clergyman, was born in Surrey on 19 December 1701 and baptized on 25 December in St Olave's, Southwark, the second son of Gabriel Ayscough (bap. 1668) and his wife, Mary. He was educated at ...

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Balthild [St Balthild, Balthilda] (d. c. 680), queen of the Franks, consort of Clovis II of Neustria, was a Saxon, almost certainly born in England, probably in the early or mid-630s. She became a Frankish queen and founded the convent of Chelles, to which she retired during the last years of her life. There she was revered as a saint soon after her death. Her life, written before 690–91 by someone at ...

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Barking, Richard of (d. 1246), abbot of Westminster and royal counsellor, was presumably a native of Barking in Essex. His mother, Lucy, was commemorated by an obit celebration at Westminster, and can probably be identified as Lucy, widow of Richard of Barking, who gave the abbey land at ...

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Barnewall, Robert, styled twelfth Baron Trimleston (c. 1704–1779), landowner and Roman Catholic activist, was the eldest son of John Barnewall, styled eleventh Baron Trimleston (1672–1746), and his wife, Mary, or Margaret (d. 1771), daughter and heir of Sir John Barnewall. Descended from an Anglo-Norman family whose estates in the counties of ...

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Henry Beaufort (1375?–1447) stone effigy © English Heritage. NMR

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Beaufort, Henry [called the Cardinal of England] (1375?–1447), bishop of Winchester and cardinal, was the second of four illegitimate children of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster (1340–1399), and Katherine Swynford (1350?–1403), daughter of the Hainaulter Sir Payn Roelt, who was governess to the duke's children [...

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Benedict [Benedict of Peterborough] (c. 1135–1193), abbot of Peterborough and royal councillor, is first recorded at the event that shaped his life, as an eyewitness to the murder of Thomas Becket in his cathedral church at Canterbury on 29 December 1170. A monk of ...

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Bertie [née Willoughby; other married name Brandon], Katherine, duchess of Suffolk (1519–1580), noblewoman and protestant patron, was the daughter of William Willoughby, eleventh Baron Willoughby de Eresby, a baron whose holdings ran to some thirty manors in Lincolnshire (and almost as many in ...