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Bodi [Bode], John (fl. 1357), Benedictine monk and scholastic writer, graduated doctor of divinity at Oxford University. His institutional affiliation is not known, but he might have been attached to Gloucester College, which was established for monks of his order. His personal circumstances are known only from an incident in which a friar was ordered by the university to make a public apology for having made insulting references to him in a lecture of 20 December 1357. The following January ...

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Byrhtferth of Ramsey (fl. c. 986–c. 1016), Benedictine monk and scholar, was the author of a substantial corpus of writing, in both Latin and Old English. Very little is known of his life beyond what can be gleaned from incidental references in his writings....

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Easton, Adam (c. 1330–1397), Benedictine monk, scholar, and ecclesiastic, was presumably a native of the village of Easton 6 miles north-west of Norwich. He became a monk of Norwich Cathedral priory, and there are some grounds for believing that the young novice found his religious community there 'a centre of lively theological controversy' (...

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Odington [name in religion Evesham], Walter (fl. c. 1280–1301), Benedictine monk and scholar, was also known as Walter Evesham and as Walter de Otyngton, monk of Evesham, and has in the past had his identity masked by sixteenth-century bibliographers, who attributed important treatises on music and science to separate writers bearing some variants of these names. Thus ...

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Oswald (fl. 1006–1042), Benedictine monk and scholar, was the nephew of St Oswald, archbishop of York. The earliest period of Oswald's life was spent as an oblate at Ramsey. According to the twelfth-century Liber benefactorum of Ramsey, he was one of the four schoolboys who, in the time of ...

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Paris, Matthew (c. 1200–1259), historian, Benedictine monk, and polymath, reveals very little about his own life and personal circumstances. This is disappointing as well as ironical, considering his compulsive concern to collect and record information relating to the events and affairs of his own time, and his acute inquisitiveness concerning times past. Even his parentage, nationality, and social origins remain uncertain....

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Matthew Paris (c. 1200–1259) manuscript drawing The British Library

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